विमान

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Hindi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Sanskrit विमान (vimāna)

Noun[edit]

विमान (vimānm (Urdu spelling ومان)

  1. airplane, aircraft, airliner, jet
    वह विमान से छतरी के सहारे उतर गया।
    He got down from the airplane with the help of a parachute.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Marathi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Sanskrit विमान (vimāna)

Noun[edit]

विमान (vimān?

  1. airplane

References[edit]


Sanskrit[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the root vi-√man

Adjective[edit]

विमान (ví-māna)

  1. devoid of honour, disgraced (BhP.)
Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

विमान (ví-mānam

  1. disrespect, dishonour
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Adjective[edit]

विमान (ví-māna)

  1. measuring out, traversing (RV., AV., MBh.)
Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

विमान (ví-mānan, m

  1. a car or chariot of the gods, any mythical self-moving aerial car (sometimes serving as a seat or throne, sometimes self-moving and carrying its occupant through the air; other descriptions make the vimāna more like a house or palace, and one kind is said to be 7 stories high; that of रावण (rāvaṇa) was called पुष्पक (puṣpaka); the नौविमान (nau-vi-māna) [Ragh. XVO, 68] is thought to resemble a ship) (MBh., (Kāv. etc.)
Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

विमान (vímānam

  1. airplane, aircraft
  2. any car or vehicle (especially a bier) (Rājat. VII, 446)
  3. the palace of an emperor or supreme monarch (especially one with 7 stories) (MBh., Kāv. etc.)
  4. a temple or shrine of a particular form (VarBṛS.)
  5. a kind of tower (?) (R. V, 52, 8)
  6. grove (Jātakam.)
  7. ship, boat (L.)
  8. horse (L.)
Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

विमान (ví-mānan

  1. measure (RV.)
  2. extension (RV.)
  3. (medicine) the science of (right) measure or proportion (e.g. of the right relation between the humours of the body, of medicines and remedies etc.) (Car.)
Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • Sir Monier Monier-Williams, A Sanskrit-English dictionary etymologically and philologically arranged with special reference to cognate Indo-European languages, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1898, pages 0951, 0979, 0980