वृष

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Sanskrit[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably later form of वृषन् (vṛṣan).

Noun[edit]

वृष (vṛṣam

  1. man, male, husband
  2. the male of any animal
  3. bull (in older language only)
  4. the zodiacal sign Taurus
  5. a strong or potent man (one of the four classes into which men are divided in erotic works.)
  6. the chief of a class or anything the most excellent or preeminent or best of its kind
    vṛṣo 'ṅgulinām — the chief among fingers, the thumb
    vṛṣo gavām or simply vṛṣaḥ — the bull among cows, the principal die in a game at dice; often at the end of a compound, e.g.
    kapivṛṣāḥ — the chief monkeys
  7. Justice or Virtue personified as a bull or as Shiva's bull
  8. just or virtuous act, virtue, moral merit
  9. name of Shiva
  10. semen virile
  11. water
  12. mouse, rat (compare वृश (vṛ́śa) and वृषदंश (vṛṣa-daṃśa))
  13. enemy
  14. a particular form of a temple
  15. a piece of ground suitable for the foundation of a house
  16. name of Viṣṇu-kṛṣṇa
  17. name of Indra
  18. name of the Sun
  19. name of Kāma-deva
  20. name of the regent of the Karaṇa Catuṣ-pada
  21. name of Indra in the 11th manvantara
  22. name of a साध्य (sādhya)
  23. name of one of स्कन्द (skanda)'s attendants
  24. name of an asura (= वृषभ (vṛṣabha))
  25. name of two sons of Krishna
  26. name of कर्ण (karṇa)
  27. name of a son of वृषसेन (vṛṣa-sena) and grandson of कर्ण (karṇa)
  28. name of a Yādava and son of Madhu
  29. name of a son of Sṛñjaya
  30. name of an ancient king
  31. name of one of the 10 horses of the Moon
  32. name of various plants (Gendarussa Vulgaris or Adhatoda; Boerhavia Procumbens or Variegata; a species of bulbous plant growing on the हिमवत् (himavat) etc.)

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

वृष (vṛṣan

  1. a woman's apartment
  2. myrobalan
  3. a peacock's plumage or tail

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • Sir Monier Monier-Williams, A Sanskrit-English dictionary etymologically and philologically arranged with special reference to cognate Indo-European languages, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1898, page 1011