साधु

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Sanskrit[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with Old Armenian աջ ().

Adjective[edit]

साधु (sādhú)

  1. straight, right
  2. leading straight to a goal, hitting the mark, unerring (as an arrow or thunderbolt)
  3. straightened, not entangled (as threads)
  4. well-disposed, kind, willing, obedient
  5. successful, effective, efficient (as a hymn or prayer)
  6. ready, prepared (as soma)
  7. peaceful, secure
  8. powerful, excellent, good for (locative) or towards (locative, genitive, dative, accusative, with प्रति (prati), अनु (anu), अभि (abhi), परि (pari), or compound)
  9. fit, proper, right
  10. good, virtuous, honourable, righteous
  11. well-born, noble, of honourable or respectable descent
  12. correct, pure
  13. classical (as language)

Declension[edit]

Adverb[edit]

साधु (sādhú)

  1. straight, aright, regularly
  2. well, rightly, skilfully, properly, agreeably
    sādhú √vṛt (+ locative) — to behave well towards
    sādhú √kṛ — to set eight
    sādhú √ās — to be well or at ease
  3. well, greatly, in a high degree
  4. assuredly, indeed

Interjection[edit]

साधु (sādhú)

  1. good! well done! bravo!
  2. well, enough of, away with (+instrumental)!
  3. well come on! (+imperative or 1. pr.)

Noun[edit]

साधु (sādhúm

  1. a good or virtuous or honest man
  2. a holy man, saint, sage, seer; a sadhu
  3. (Jainism) a जिन (jina) or deified saint
  4. a jeweller
  5. a merchant, money-lender, usurer
  6. (grammar) a derivative or inflected noun
  7. a saintly woman
  8. a kind of root (= मेदा (medā))

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

साधु (sādhún

  1. the good or right or honest, a good etc. thing or act
    साध्व् अस्ति (sādhv asti) (+dative) — it is well with
    sādhu-√man (+ accusative) — to consider a thing good, approve
  2. gentleness, kindness, benevolence

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • Sir Monier Monier-Williams, A Sanskrit-English dictionary etymologically and philologically arranged with special reference to cognate Indo-European languages, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1898, page 1201