-dom

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English -dom, from Old English -dōm (-dom: state, condition, power, dominion, authority, property, right, office, quality, suffix), from Proto-Germanic *-dōmaz (-dom). Cognate with Scots -dom (-dom), North Frisian -dom (-dom), West Frisian -dom (-dom), Dutch -dom (-dom), Low German -dom (-dom), German -tum (-dom), Swedish -dom (-dom), Norwegian -dom (-dom), Icelandic -dómur (-dom), Norwegian Bokmål -dømme, Norwegian Nynorsk -døme. Same as Old English dōm (doom, judgment, sentence, condemnation, ordeal, judicial sentence, decree, ordinance, law, custom; justice, equity; direction, ruling, governing, command; might, power, dominion, supremacy, majesty, glory, magnificence, splendor, reputation, honor, praise, dignity, authority; state, condition). More at doom.

Suffix[edit]

-dom

  1. Forming nouns denoting the condition or state of the suffixed word.
    boredom, freedom, martyrdom, stardom
    • 1995, Isabel Fonseca, Bury Me Standing, Vintage 2007, p. 74:
      there always seemed to be one outrageous beauty: an angel who would have been forced into indentured topmodeldom had she been found on a Paris bus; or a wavy-lipped, chisel-chinned, almond-eyed boy-warrior out of the Iliad, as beautiful as humans come.
  2. Forming nouns denoting the domain or jurisdiction of the suffixed word.
    Christendom, fiefdom, kingdom, Saxondom
  3. Forming nouns denoting the fandom of the suffixed word.
    furrydom, gothdom, Potterdom, stfdom
  4. Forming nouns — usually nonce words — denoting the set of all examples of the suffixed word.
    catdom, dogdom
    • 2011, Caitlin Moran, The Times, 19 Mar 2011:
      It is only the English language that has let the cabbage down – giving it, quite frankly, the ugliest name in all of veg-dom.


Derived terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch -dom, from Old Dutch -duom, from Proto-Germanic *dōmaz. Cognate with English -dom, German -tum.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-dom m

  1. belonging to a domain or territory (e.g. groothertogdom (grandduchy); this sense is no longer productive)
  2. quality or condition of the adjective stem (e.g. eigendom less productive than suffixes like -heid)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ J. de Vries & F. de Tollenaere, "Etymologisch Woordenboek", Uitgeverij Het Spectrum, Utrecht, 1986 (14de druk)

Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse -dómr

Suffix[edit]

-dom

  1. Suffix used to form nouns out of adjectives, meaning the quality, property or condition of the adjective.

Derived terms[edit]


Low German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German -dom, from Old Saxon -dōm, from Proto-Germanic *dōmaz. Cognate with English -dom, Dutch -dom, German -tum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-dom

  1. belonging to a domain or territory (e.g. Hartogdom (duchy); this sense is no longer productive)
  2. quality or condition of the adjective stem (e.g. Riekdom less productive than suffixes like -heit)

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English -dōm from dōm "state, condition, authority, jurisdiction".

Suffix[edit]

-dom

  1. Belonging to a domain or jurisdiction.
  2. Condition or quality.

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old Saxon -dōm from dōm "state, condition, authority, jurisdiction".

Suffix[edit]

-dom

  1. (belonging to a) domain or jurisdiction
  2. condition or quality

Swedish[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-dom

  1. -hood, -ledge, -ness; making a noun (representing a state) from an adjective or noun, e.g. rik (rich) → rikedom (wealth, fortune); ung (young) → ungdom (youth); barn (child) → barndom (childhood)

Usage notes[edit]

  • These nouns don't double the m in definite or plural forms, e.g. rikedomen, ungdomar. This is the same for the noun dom (judgement, verdict).

See also[edit]