Allan

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Translingual[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Allan

  1. A botanical plant name author abbreviation for botanist Harry Howard Barton Allan (1882-1957).

External links[edit]


English[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Allan

  1. A male given name, a less common spelling of Alan.
    • 1866 William 'Wilkie' Collins: Armadale. Kissinger Publishing 2004. ISBN 1417911972 page 288:
      "If I had been a man," she said, "I should so like to have been called Allan!" - - -
      "Call me by my name, if you really like it," he whispered persuasively. "Call me 'Allan', for once - just to try."
  2. A surname derived from the given name, more often spelled Allen.
  3. A town in Saskatchewan, Canada

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Allan in the 19th century.

Proper noun[edit]

Allan

  1. A male given name.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Popular in Denmark in the 1960s and the 1970s.

References[edit]

  • [1] Danskernes Navne, based on CPR data: 23 452 males with the given name Allan have been registered in Denmark between about 1890 (=the population alive in 1967) and January 2005, with the frequency peak in the 1960s. Accessed on 19 June 2011.

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Allan in the 20th century.

Proper noun[edit]

Allan

  1. A male given name.

Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Allan at the end of the 19th century.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈɑlːɑn]
  • Hyphenation: Al‧lan

Proper noun[edit]

Allan

  1. A male given name.
    • 2006 Allan Mutka, Rippipuku, Tammi, ISBN 951-31-3487-3, page 96:
      ―Päivää, mä olen Altsu, tai toi Allan on se oikea nimi.
      ―Sehän on mukava miehen nimi, vähän harvinaisempikin, rouva säteili.
      Meinasin sanoa että joo, mustalaismannet suosivat, mutta jätin kuitenkin sanomatta.

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Allan in the 19th centruy.

Proper noun[edit]

Allan

  1. A male given name.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Popular in Sweden from the 1910s to the 1930s.