Amazon

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See also: amazon

English[edit]

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Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English, from Latin, from Ancient Greek Ἀμαζών (Amazṓn).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Amazon (plural Amazons)

  1. (Greek mythology) A member of a mythical race of female warriors inhabiting the Black Sea area.
  2. A female warrior.
  3. A tall, strong, or athletic woman.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Spanish, Río Amazonas. It is common belief that the Spanish explorer Francisco de Orellana fought a battle against a tribe of Tapuya natives, in which the women fought alongside the men, and that he derived the name from the Amazons in Greek mythology.

Proper noun[edit]

the Amazon

  1. A river of South America that flows through Brazil for about 4000 miles to the South Atlantic.
  2. A region including much of this river; specifically, the region of the Amazon Rainforest, or of the Amazon River Basin.
  3. Used attributively in compounds.
    the Amazon River; the Amazon Rainforest; the Amazon Basin
    Amazon milk frog
Translations[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

Amazon (plural Amazons)

  1. Any of the large parrots from the genus Amazona.

Etymology 3[edit]

Chosen by Jeff Bezos in 1994 as a word beginning with 'A' which had existing connotations (see meanings listed in etymologies 1 & 2) of being exotic, different, and (as the Amazon River) the largest of its kind in the world.[1]

Proper noun[edit]

Amazon

  1. Amazon.com Inc, a very large internet retailer

Verb[edit]

Amazon (third-person singular simple present Amazons, present participle Amazoning, simple past and past participle Amazoned)

  1. (transitive) To overwhelm or obliterate, in the context of an Internet start-up vastly outperforming its brick-and-mortar competition.
    • 1998, George Anders, "Discomfort Zone: Some Big Companies Long to Embrace Web But Settle for Flirtation — They Fear Online Marketing Could Cause Sales Staffs And Distributors to Rebel — A Risk of Getting ‘Amazoned’", The Wall Street Journal, 1998-11-04, p. A1. [1]
      Those who hesitate risk being "amazoned," forfeiting business to an Internet newcomer, in the way that bookstore chains have lost ground to Amazon.com Inc., the online bookseller.
    • 1999, Andrew Wileman, "Smart cookies: Get set to Amazon", Management Today. Aug 1999, p. 79 [2]
      Venture capitalists' desks are thick with business plans promising ‘we're going to Amazon the insurance/travel/property business...’
    • 1999, Tim Smith, InternetWeek (786), "Getting Customers Totally Integrated – Cisco CIO Pete Solvik", 1999-10-25, p. 98 [3]
      Take the example of MetalSite.com, which is owned by steel companies. The steel companies aren't getting "Amazoned" by a start-up but, rather, they are doing the "Amazoning" within their own industry.
    • 1999, "Amazon Expands", InternetWeek (789), 1999-11-15, p. 11 [4]
      Amazon.com may soon be "amazoning" a few more industries.
    • 2000, Bob Tedeschi, "E-Commerce Report: Web and catalog businesses are crossing into storefront territory, creating parallel avenues of retailing", The New York Times, 2000-11-20, p. C12 [5]
      Gone are the days when they agonized about being "Amazoned", or blind-sided by a dot-com ....
    • 2001, Saul Hansell, "Web Sales of Airline Tickets Are Making Hefty Advances", The New York Times, 2001-07-04, p. A1 [6]
      In other industries, established companies are pulling people and money away from their Internet operations, as their fear of being "Amazoned" by start-ups has subsided.
    • 2001, Steve Lohr, "Gearhead Nation: A Time Out for Technophilia", The New York Times, 2001-11-18, p. WK4 [7]
      Meanwhile, traditional companies would be obliterated — "Amazoned" — by Internet upstarts.
    • 2002, Scott Harris, "Roots in Israel, Head in Silicon Valley", The New York Times, 2002-06-30, p. B8 [8]
      "Everybody was afraid of getting Amazoned," Mr. Landan said. "They didn't want to get left behind."

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ann Byers, Jeff Bezos: the founder of amazon.com, pp. 46-7, Rosen Publishing Group, 2007, ISBN 1-4042-0717-1

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Amāzon f (genitive Amāzonis); third declension

  1. an Amazon
  2. a female warrior

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative Amāzon Amāzonēs
genitive Amāzonis Amāzonum
dative Amāzonī Amāzonibus
accusative Amāzonem Amāzonēs
ablative Amāzone Amāzonibus
vocative Amāzon Amāzonēs