Appendix:Glossary of baseball jargon (0-9)

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The following is a glossary of baseball jargon (phrases, idioms and slang):


Appendix: Glossary of Baseball
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0-9[edit]

0-1 ("oh and one"), also, 1-0, 0-2, 1-1, 2-0, 1-2, 2-1, 3-0, 2-2, 3-1, 3-2[edit]
The possible instances of the "count," the number of balls and strikes currently tallied against a batter. Traditionally, the first number in the count corresponds to balls, and the second, strikes; Japanese and Korean baseball leagues use the opposite order, however (strikes followed by balls).
1[edit]
Scorekeepers assign a number from 1 to 9 to each position on the field in order to record the outcome of each play in a more or less uniform shorthand notation. The number 1 corresponds to the pitcher.
Also, a fielder may shout "One!" to a teammate to indicate that he should throw the ball to first base.
Finally, in the context of pitching, the number 1 is a common sign (and nickname) for the fastball.
1-2-3 inning[edit]
An inning in which a pitcher faces only three batters and retires them all without any reaching base.
1-6-3 double play[edit]
A double play in which the pitcher (1) throws the ball to the shortstop (6), who in turn throws to the first baseman (3). Typically, the shortstop and first baseman each retire a baserunner (often on a force play) after receiving the ball.
The scorekeeper uses such shorthand to record the result of every play. In this case, he makes a notation that the runner at first base was retired "1-6", but then makes a notation showing that the batter was retired "1-6-3", to account for every player who handled the ball on the play.
2[edit]
The catcher, in scorekeeping shorthand. Also, a shout of "Two!" indicates that the ball should be thrown to second base.
The number 2 is also a common sign for a curveball or other breaking pitch.
3[edit]
The first baseman, in scorekeeping shorthand. Also, a shout of "Three!" indicates that the ball should be thrown to third base.
The number three is also a common sign for a slider, changeup, or other pitch (generally, the pitcher's third best pitch).
3-2-3 double play[edit]
A relatively rare double play in which the first baseman fields a batted ball and throws to the catcher to retire a runner advancing from third. The catcher then throws back to the first baseman to retire the batter. This play most often occurs with the bases loaded, in which situation a force play exists at both home plate and first base, but it is possible for this double play to be executed with a tag of a runner at home.
The scorekeeper makes a notation that the runner at third base was retired "3-2", and the batter was retired "3-2-3".
One notable example of this play occurred in Game 7 of the 1991 World Series, when catcher Brian Harper and first baseman Kent Hrbek of the Minnesota Twins retired the Atlanta Braves' Lonnie Smith at home plate and Sid Bream at first. This play prevented the Braves from scoring any runs in that inning and maintained a scoreless tie.
3-6-3 double play[edit]
A double play in which the first baseman fields a batted ball and throws it to the shortstop, who retires a runner advancing to second base and then throws back to the first baseman, who completes the play by retiring the batter. The scorekeeper makes a notation that the runner at first was retired "3-6", and the batter was retired "3-6-3".
4[edit]
The second baseman, in scorekeeping shorthand. Also, a shout of "Four!" indicates that the ball should be thrown to home plate.
The number four is a less common pitch sign.
4-6-3 double play[edit]
A fairly common double play in which the second baseman fields a batted ball and throws to the shortstop, who retires a runner advancing to second base (usually a force play). The shortstop then throws to the first baseman, who completes the play by retiring the runner (again, usually a force play). The scorekeeper makes a notation that the runner at first base was retired "4-6", and the batter was retired "4-6-3".
5[edit]
The third baseman, in scorekeeping shorthand.
5-4-3 double play[edit]
A relatively common double play in which the third baseman fields a batted ball and throws to the second baseman, who retires a runner advancing to second base (usually a force play) and throws to the first baseman, who completes the play by retiring the batter (usually a force play). The scorekeeper makes a notation that the runner on first was retired "5-4" and the batter "5-4-3". This is sometimes referred to as the "round the horn" double play.
5 tool player[edit]
The ideal position player (non-pitcher); an athlete who excels at hitting for both high average and power, possesses good footspeed and baserunning skills, has a strong and accurate throwing arm, and plays above-average defense. Major league scouts and instructors observe and evaluate the development of these "tools" in their "prospects" (aspiring Major League ballplayers).
Some well-known "five-tool" players are Willie Mays, Roberto Clemente, Derek Jeter, Torii Hunter. Andruw Jones, Vladimir Guerrero, and Carlos Beltrán.
6[edit]
The shortstop, in scorekeeping shorthand.
6-4-3 double play[edit]
A very common double play in which the shortstop fields a batted ball and throws to the second baseman, who retires a runner advancing to second base (usually a force play) and then throws to the first baseman, who completes the play by retiring the batter (usually a force play). The scorekeeper makes a notation that the runner on first base was retired "6-4" and the batter "6-4-3". 6-4-3 and 4-6-3 are the two most common double plays, with 6-4-3 predominating because right-handed batters, who are more prevalent than left-handed batters, tend to pull the ball toward left field.
This is the double play performed by "Tinker to Evers to Chance", the fabled Chicago Cubs' infielders of the early 20th century.
7[edit]
The leftfielder, in scorekeeping shorthand.
8[edit]
The centerfielder, in scorekeeping shorthand.
9[edit]
The rightfielder, in scorekeeping shorthand.
12-to-6[edit]
A curve ball, the motion of which evokes the hands of clock. The ball starts high (at "12-o'clock") and drops sharply as it reaches the strike zone ("6-o'clock"). Also known as "12-to-6 Downers" or a "12-to-6 Drop". Pitchers whose curveballs exhibit this motion include Barry Zito and Nolan Ryan.
55-footer[edit]
A pejorative term for a pitch that bounces before it reaches the plate. The name derives from the fact that the pitch falls short of the 60' 6" between the pitching rubber and the plate.

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