Appendix:Proto-Algonquian/-piti

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This Proto-Algonquian entry contains reconstructed words and roots. As such, the term(s) in this entry are not directly attested, but are hypothesized to have existed based on comparative evidence.

Proto-Algonquian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the same Proto-Algic root as Yurok 'na-rpehl/ʔnerpel (my tooth) and Wiyot khàpt (your tooth).

Noun[edit]

*-piti, -piči, *-i·piti, *-i·piči

  1. tooth

Usage notes[edit]

  • This term was (and in child languages remains) inalienable; it had to be preceded by a personal prefix such as *ni- (my), *ki- (your (singular)), or *wi- (his or her), as in *ni·piči (my tooth), *ki·piči (your tooth), *wi·piči (his or her tooth). For this reason, it is not clear if -i·- was part of the root.
  • č was an allophone of t before i, for which reason some sources give the reconstruction as -(i·)piči.

Descendants[edit]

  • Abenaki: wibid, wipit (her or his tooth)
  • Arapaho: néíčiθ (my tooth)
  • Cree: nîpit / ᓃᐱᐟ (my tooth)
  • Fox: -îpichi (tooth)
  • Malecite-Passamaquoddy: -pit (tooth), as in nipit (my tooth), wipit (his tooth)
  • Massachusett: -pit (tooth), as in neepit (my tooth), weepit (his tooth)
  • Miami: niipiti, niipita (my tooth)
  • Mohegan-Pequot: -iput (tooth)
  • Ojibwe: biinaabide (she or he has clean teeth)
  • Quiripi: képut (teeth)
  • Unami: wipit (her or his tooth)

References[edit]

  • Siebert (1975)
  • Anthropological Linguistics (the journal of Indiana University's Department of Anthropology), volume 39, issue 1 (1997)
  • Nicholas Evans, Dying Words: Endangered Languages and What They Have to Tell Us