Appendix:Slovak given names

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The following names are present in the 2004 Slovak calendar. They represent only names common in Slovakia and not names from other Slavic Nations. The following etymological roots can be identified in the names by a modern Slovak language speaker:

  • blah, blaž – happiness, wealth, wellbeing
  • boh, bož – god, divine
  • bol – pain (this is most probably a misleading "folk-etymology", at least in what concerns the Boleslav name - the bole part here does not root from bol =pain, but from an old Slavic word bole meaning great or large - compare Russian bol'shoy)
  • bran – to defend, defender
  • bystr – clever, smart, swift
  • cti, čest – pride, honour
  • dan – to be given
  • dar – gift
  • dobr – good, kindness
  • drah – dear
  • duch, duš – soul, spirit
  • jar – spring, young, fresh
  • jelen – deer [not important]
  • kaz – to break, to destroy
  • kvet – flower
  • lad – beauty, accord
  • ľub – to love
  • ľud – people
  • mil – to love
  • mir, mír – world, peace
  • moj – me, mine, myself
  • rad – to be glad, to like
  • ruž – rose
  • slav – fame, to praise, to celebrate
  • stan – to become
  • svät – mighty, after the christanisation a word for saint was needed so now it means also holy, sacred, saint
  • svetl – light, to shine
  • tich – silence, quietness
  • vier – to believe, faith
  • vit, vít – lord, winner
  • víťaz – to win, winner
  • vlad – to rule, ruler
  • vlast – homeland, fatherland
  • vrat – to return
  • zlat – gold, golden
  • žal, žel – to mourn, sadness


Male and female[edit]

The male given name is followed by the short or diminutive form in parentheses, then by a corresponding female form (and short/diminutive), where applicable.

  • Bohdan, Bohdana
  • Bohumil (Bohuš), Bohumila
  • Bohumír (Bohuš), Bohumíra
  • Bohuslav (Bohuš), Bohuslava
  • Branislav (Braňo), Branislava
  • Dobromil, Dobromila
  • Dobroslav, Dobroslava
  • Drahomír (Drahoš), Drahomíra (Drahoša, Drahuša)
  • Drahoslav (Drahoš), Drahoslava (Drahoša, Drahuša)
  • Dušan, Dušana
  • Jaroslav (Jaro), Jaroslava (Jara, Jarka)
  • Kvetoslav, Kvetoslava
  • Ladislav (Laco), Ladislava
  • Ľubomír (Ľubo), Ľubomíra (Ľuba)
  • Ľuboslav (Ľubo), Ľuboslava
  • Ľuboš (Ľubo), Ľubica
  • Ľudomil (Ľudo), Ľudmila (Ľuda, Ľudka)
  • Miloslav (Milo), Miloslava (Mila, Milka)
  • Miroslav (Miro), Miroslava (Mira, Mirka)
  • Radmil, Radmila
  • Slavomír (Slavo), Slavomíra (Slava, Slávka)
  • Stanislav (Stano), Stanislava (Staňa, Stanka)
  • Vladimír (Vlado), Vladimíra (Vlada, Vladka)
  • Vladislav (Vlado), Vladislava (Vlada, Vladka)
  • Vlastimil, Vlasta
  • Zlatko, Zlatica (Zlata)


Mostly male[edit]

Female forms can be formed, but are very unusual or unused.

  • Blahoslav
  • Blažej
  • Boleslav, Boleslaw
  • Bystrík
  • Ctibor
  • Čestmír
  • Dalibor
  • Dalimil
  • Jaromír
  • Jaroslav
  • Kazimír (Kazimierz)
  • Levoslav
  • Ľubor (Ľubo)
  • Ľudovít (Ľudo)
  • Milan
  • Miloš
  • Miroslav, Miroslaw
  • Mojmír
  • Radomír
  • Radoslav, Radoslaw
  • Radovan (Rado)
  • Radúz
  • Rastislav (Rasťo)
  • Svätopluk (Sveto, Sveťo)
  • Svätozár (Sveto, Sveťo)
  • Tichomír
  • Václav, Wacław
  • Víťazoslav
  • Vladan
  • Vratislav
  • Vratko
  • Vlatislav, Władyslaw
  • Vladimir, Włodzimierz
  • Vojtech, Wojciech

Mostly female[edit]

Male forms can be formed, but are very unusual or unused.

  • Blažena
  • Božena
  • Božidara
  • Darina
  • Jarmila
  • Jela ?
  • Lesana (Lesia, Lesa) ??
  • Libuša
  • Milada
  • Milena
  • Milica
  • Milota
  • Nadežda (Russian origin, means hope)
  • Ružena
  • Sláva (Slávka)
  • Svetlana
  • Viera
  • Vieroslava
  • Zora
  • Želmíra (Žela, Želka)