Wiktionary:Webster 1913/1496

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Page 1496

theosoph, theosopher[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A theosophist.

theosophic, theosophical[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[Cf. F. <ets>théosophique</ets>.]

  1. Of or pertaining to theosophy. -- <wordforms><wf>The`o*soph"ic*al*ly</wf>, adv.</wordforms>

theosophism[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[Cf. F. <ets>théosophisme</ets>.]

  1. Belief in theosophy. - Murdock

theosophist[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. One addicted to theosophy.
    Quotations
    • The theosophist is one who gives you a theory of God, or of the works of God, which has not reason, but an inspiration of his own, for its basis. - R. A. Vaughan

theosophistical[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Of or pertaining to theosophy; theosophical.

theosophize[edit]

Intransitive verb[edit]

<wordforms>[imp. & p. p. Theosophized (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Theosophizing.]</wordforms> <def>To practice theosophy. [R.]

theosophy[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[Gr. knowledge of things divine, fr. wise in the things of God; God + wise: cf. F. <ets>théosophie</ets>.]

  1. Any system of philosophy or mysticism which proposes to attain intercourse with God and superior spirits, and consequent superhuman knowledge, by physical processes, as by the theurgic operations of some ancient Platonists, or by the chemical processes of the German fire philosophers; also, a direct, as distinguished from a revealed, knowledge of God, supposed to be attained by extraordinary illumination; especially, a direct insight into the processes of the divine mind, and the interior relations of the divine nature.

therapeutæ, therapeutae[edit]

n. pl.

Etymology[edit]

[NL., fr. Gr. (pl. ) an attendant, servant, physician. See Therapeutic.]

  1. (Eccl. Hist.): A name given to certain ascetics said to have anciently dwelt in the neighborhood of Alexandria. They are described in a work attributed to Philo, the genuineness and credibility of which are now much discredited.

therapeutic, therapeutical[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[F. <ets>thérapeutique</ets>, Gr. , from attendant, servant, to serve, take care of, treat medically, attendant, servant.]

  1. (Med.): Of or pertaining to the healing art; concerned in discovering and applying remedies for diseases; curative. Therapeutic or curative physic." - Sir T. Browne
    Quotations
    • Medicine is justly distributed into prophylactic," or the art of preserving health, and therapeutic, or the art of restoring it. - I. Watts

therapeutic[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. One of the Therapeutæ.

therapeutics[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[Cf. F. <ets>thérapeutique</ets>.]

  1. That part of medical science which treats of the discovery and application of remedies for diseases.

therapeutist[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. One versed in therapeutics, or the discovery and application of remedies.

therapy[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[Gr. .]

  1. Therapeutics.

thereabout, thereabouts[edit]

Adverb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[The latter spelling is less proper, but more commonly used.]

  1. Near that place.
  2. Near that number, degree, or quantity; nearly; <as>as, ten men, or <ex>thereabouts</ex></as>.
    Quotations
    • Five or six thousand horse . . . or thereabouts.

- Shakespeare,

  1. Quotations
    • Some three months since, or thereabout. - Suckling
  2. Concerning that; about that. [R.]
    Quotations
    • What will ye dine? I will go thereabout. - Chaucer
    Quotations

thereafter[edit]

Adverb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[AS. <ets>\'eb\'d6ræfter</ets> after that. See There, and After.]

  1. After that; afterward.
  2. According to that; accordingly.
    Quotations
    • I deny not but that it is of greatest concernment in the church and commonwealth to have a vigilant eye how books demean themselves as well as men; and thereafter to confine, imprison, and do sharpest justice on them as malefactors. - Milton
  3. Of that sort. (Obsolete): My audience is not thereafter." - Latimer

thereagain[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. In opposition; against one's course. (Obsolete):
    Quotations
    • If that him list to stand thereagain. - Chaucer

there-anent[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. Concerning that. [Scot.]

thereat[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. At that place; there.
    Quotations
    • Wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat. - Matt. vii. 13
  2. At that occurrence or event; on that account.
    Quotations
    • Every error is a stain to the beauty of nature; for which cause it blusheth thereat. - Hooker

therebefore, therebiforn[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. Before that time; beforehand. (Obsolete):
    Quotations
    • Many a winter therebiforn. - Chaucer

thereby[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. By that; by that means; in consequence of that.
    Quotations
    • Acquaint now thyself with him, and be at peace; thereby good shall come unto thee. - Job xxii. 21
  2. Annexed to that. Thereby hangs a tale."

- Shakespeare,

  1. Thereabout; -- said of place, number, etc. - Chaucer

therefrom[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. From this or that.
    Quotations
    • Turn not aside therefrom to the right hand or to the left. - John. xxiii. 6

therein[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. In that or this place, time, or thing; in that particular or respect. - Wyclif
    Quotations
    • He pricketh through a fair forest,

Therein is many a wild beast. - Chaucer

  1. Quotations
    • Bring forth abundantly in the earth, and multiply therein. - Gen. ix. 7
    Quotations
    • Therein our letters do not well agree.

- Shakespeare,

thereinto[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. Into that or this, or into that place. - Bacon
    Quotations

thereof[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. Of that or this.
    Quotations
    • In the day that thou eatest thereof, thou shalt surely die. - Gen. ii. 17

thereology[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. Therapeutios.

thereon[edit]

Adverb[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[AS. <ets>ron</ets>. See There, and On.]

  1. On that or this. - Chaucer
    Quotations

thereout[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. Out of that or this.
    Quotations
    • He shall take thereout his handful of the flour. - Lev. ii. 2
  2. On the outside; out of doors. (Obsolete): - Chaucer

thereto[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. To that or this. - Chaucer
  2. Besides; moreover. (Obsolete): - Spenser
    Quotations
    • Her mouth full small, and thereto soft and red. - Chaucer

theretofore[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. Up to that time; before then; -- correlative with heretofore.

thereunder[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. Under that or this.

thereunto[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. Unto that or this; thereto; besides.

- Shakespeare,

thereupon[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. Upon that or this; thereon. They shall feed thereupon." - Zeph. ii. 7
  2. On account, or in consequence, of that; therefore.
    Quotations
    • [He] hopes to find you forward, . . .

And thereupon he sends you this good news. - Shakespeare,

  1. Immediately; at once; without delay.

therewhile[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. At that time; at the same time. (Obsolete): - Laud

therewith[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. With that or this. I have learned in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content." - Phil. iv. 11
  2. In addition; besides; moreover.
    Quotations
    • To speak of strength and therewith hardiness. - Chaucer
  3. At the same time; forthwith. (Obsolete): - Johnson

therewithal[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. Over and above; besides; moreover. (Obsolete): - Daniel
    Quotations
    • And therewithal it was full poor and bad. - Chaucer
  2. With that or this; therewith; at the same time.
    Quotations
    • Thy slanders I forgive; and therewithal

Remit thy other forfeits - Shakespeare,

  1. Quotations
    • And therewithal one came and seized on her,

And Enid started waking. - Tennyson

therf[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[AS. <ets>eorf</ets>; akin to OHG. <ets>derb</ets>, Icel. <ets>jarfr</ets>.]

  1. Not fermented; unleavened; -- said of bread, loaves, etc. (Obsolete):
    Quotations
    • Pask and the feast of therf loaves. - Wyclif