Wiktionary:Webster 1913/979

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Page 979

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Noduled[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Having little knots or lumps.

Nodulose, Nodulous[edit]

<hw>

Adjective[edit]

  1. (Biol.): Having small nodes or knots; diminutively nodose.

Noel[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

F. <ets>noël</ets>, L. <ets>natalis</ets> birthday, fr. <ets>natalis</ets> natal. See Natal

  1. Same as Nowel.

Noematachograph[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Gr. the understanding + swiftness + <ets>-graph</ets>.]

  1. An instrument for determining and registering the duration of more or less complex operations of the mind.

Dunglison

Noematic, Noematical[edit]

<hw>

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Gr. the understanding. See Noetic

  1. Of or pertaining to the understanding. (Obsolete)

Cudworth

Noemics[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Gr. the understanding. See Noetic

  1. The science of the understanding; intellectual science.

Noetian[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Eccl. Hist.): One of the followers of [[Noetus, who lived in the third century. He denied the distinct personality of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost.

Noetic, Noetical[edit]

<hw>

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Gr. , fr. to perceive, mind, intellect.]

  1. Of or pertaining to the intellect; intellectual.

I would employ the word noetic to express all those cognitions which originate in the mind itself. Sir W. Hamilton

Nof[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Contr. fr. <ets>ne of</ets>.]

  1. Not of; nor of. (Obsolete)

nog[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Abbrev. fr. <ets>noggin</ets>.]

  1. A noggin.
  2. A kind of strong ale.

Nog[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Etymol. uncertain.]

  1. A wooden block, of the size of a brick, built into a wall, as a hold for the nails of woodwork.
  1. One of the square logs of wood used in a pile to support the roof of a mine.
  1. (Shipbuilding): A treenail to fasten the shores.

Nog[edit]

v. t.

Etymology[edit]

From 2d Nog

  1. To fill in, as between scantling, with brickwork.
  1. (Shipbuilding): To fasten, as shores, with treenails.

Noggen[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Prop., made of hemp, fr. Prov. E. <ets>nogs</ets> hemp.]

  1. Made of hemp; hence, hard; rough; harsh. (Obsolete)

Johnson

Noggin[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ir. <ets>noigin</ets>, or Gael. <ets>noigean</ets>. Cf. lst Nog

  1. A small mug or cup.
  1. A measure equivalent to a gill. [Prov. Eng.]

Nogging[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Nog, v. t.]

  1. Rough brick masonry used to fill in the interstices of a wooden frame, in building.

Noght[edit]

adv. <def>Not. (Obsolete)

Chaucer

Noiance[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Abbrev. fr. OE. <ets>anoiance</ets>.] <altsp>[Written also <asp>noyance</asp>.]</altsp> <def>Annoyance. (Obsolete)

Tusser

Noie[edit]

v. t. <def>To annoy. See Noy. (Obsolete)

Noier[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. An annoyer. (Obsolete)

Tusser

Noils[edit]

n. pl.

Etymology[edit]

Etymol. uncertain.]

  1. Waste and knots of wool removed by the comb; combings.

Noint[edit]

v. t. <def>To anoint. (Obsolete)

Sir T. North

Noious[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Annoying; troublesome. (Obsolete)

Noise[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

F. <ets>noise</ets> noisy strife, quarrel, brawl, fr. L. <ets>nausea</ets> seasickness, sickness, disgust. See Nausea

  1. Sound of any kind.

The heavens turn about in a most rapid motion without noise

to us perceived.

Bacon
  1. Note: Noise is either a sound of too short a duration to be determined, like the report of a cannon; or else it is a confused mixture of many discordant sounds, like the rolling of thunder or the noise of the waves. Nevertheless, the difference between sound and noise is by no means precise]]

Ganot

  1. Especially, loud, confused, or senseless sound; clamor; din.
  1. Loud or continuous talk; general talk or discussion; rumor; report. The [[noise goes."

Shak

What noise have we had about transplantation of diseases and transfusion of blood! T. Baker

Soerates lived in Athens during the great plague which has made so much noise in all ages. Spectator

  1. Music, in general; a concert; also, a company of musicians; a band. (Obsolete)

Milton

The king has his noise of gypsies. B. Jonson

<syn>Syn. -- Cry; outcry; clamor; din; clatter; uproar.</syn>

Noise[edit]

v. i. <def>To sound; to make a noise.

Milton

Noise[edit]

v. t. <wordforms>[imp. & p. p. Noised ; p pr. & vb. n. Noising</wordforms>

  1. To spread by rumor or report.

All these sayings were noised abroad. Luke i. 65

  1. To disturb with noise. (Obsolete)

Dryden

Noiseful[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Loud; clamorous. (Obsolete)

Dryden

Noiseless[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Making, or causing, no noise or bustle; without noise; silent; <as>as, the <ex>noiseless</ex> foot of time</as>.

So noiseless would I live. Dryden

-- <wordforms><wf>Noise"less*ly</wf>, adv. -- <wf>Noise"less*ness</wf>, n.</wordforms>

Noisette[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Bot.): A hybrid rose produced in 1817, by a French gardener, [[Noisette, of Charleston, South Carolina, from the China rose and the musk rose. It has given rise to many fine varieties, as the <stype>Lamarque</stype>, the <stype>Marechal (or Marshal) Niel</stype>, and the <stype>Cloth of gold</stype>. Most roses of this class have clustered flowers and are of vigorous growth.

P. Henderson

Noisily[edit]

adv. <def>In a noisy manner.

Noisiness[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. The state or quality of being noisy.

Noisome[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

For <ets>noysome</ets>, fr. <ets>noy</ets> for <ets>annoy</ets>. See Annoy

  1. Noxious to health; hurtful; mischievous; unwholesome; insalubrious; destructive; <as>as, <ex>noisome</ex> effluvia</as>. [[Noisome pestilence."

Ps. xci. 3

  1. Offensive to the smell or other senses; disgusting; fetid. Foul breath is [[noisome."

Shak

-- <wordforms><wf>Noi"some*ly</wf>, adv. -- <wf>Noi"some*ness</wf>, n.</wordforms>

<syn>Syn. -- Noxious; unwholesome; insalubrious; mischievous; destructive.</syn> <usage> -- Noisome, Noxious. These words have to a great extent been interchanged; but there is a tendency to make a distinction between them, applying [[noxious to things that inflict evil directly; as, a [[noxious plant, [[noxious practices, etc., and [[noisome to things that operate with a remoter influence; as, [[noisome vapors, a [[noisome pestilence, etc. [[Noisome has the additional sense of [[disqusting. A garden may be free from [[noxious weeds or animals; but, if recently covered with manure, it may be filled with a [[noisome smell.</usage>

Noisy[edit]

Adjective[edit]

<wordforms>[Compar. Noisier ; superl. Noisiest</wordforms>

Etymology[edit]

From Noise

  1. Making a noise, esp. a loud sound; clamorous; vociferous; turbulent; boisterous; <as>as, the <ex>noisy</ex> crowd</as>.
  1. Full of noise. The [[noisy town."

Dryden

Nolde[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Contr. fr. <ets>ne wolde</ets>.]

  1. Would not. (Obsolete)

Chaucer

Nole[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See Noll

  1. The head. (Obsolete)

Shak

Noli-me-tangere[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L., touch me not.]

  1. (Bot.)</fld> <sd>(a)</sd> <def>Any plant of a genus of herbs (<spn>Impatiens</spn>) having capsules which, if touched when ripe, discharge their seeds. -- See Impatiens. <sd>(b)</sd> <def>The squirting cucumber. See under Cucumber.
  1. (Med.): A name formerly applied to several varieties of ulcerous cutaneous diseases, but now restricted to <altname>Lupus exedens</altname>, an ulcerative affection of the nose.

Nolition[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L. <ets>nolle</ets> not to will, to be unwilling; <ets>ne + velle</ets> to will, to be willing.]

  1. Adverse action of will; unwillingness; -- opposed to <ant>volition</ant>.

A nolition and a direct enmity against the lust. Jer. Taylor

Noll[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

OE. <ets>nol</ets>, AS. <ets>hnoll</ets> top; akin to OHG. <ets>hnol</ets> top, head.]

  1. The head; the noddle. (Obsolete)

Nolleity[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L. <ets>nolle</ets> to be unwilling.]

  1. The state of being unwilling; nolition. (Rare)

Nolle prosequi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L., to be unwilling to prosecute.]

  1. (Law): Will not prosecute; -- an entry on the record, denoting that a plaintiff discontinues his suit, or the attorney for the public a prosecution; either wholly, or as to some count, or as to some of several defendants.

Nolo contendere[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L., I do not wish to contend.]

  1. (Law): A plea, by the defendant, in a criminal prosecution, which, without admitting guilt, subjects him to all the consequences of a plea of quilty.

Nol. pros.[edit]

  1. An abbrev. of <er>Nolle prosequi</er>.

Nol-pros[edit]

v. t. <wordforms>[imp. & p. p. <er>-prossed</er> ; p. pr. & vb. n. <er>-prossing</er>.]</wordforms> <def>To discontinue by entering a [[nolle prosequi; to decline to prosecute.

Nolt[edit]

n. sing. & pl. <def>Neat cattle. [Prov. Eng.]

Nom[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

F. See Noun

  1. Name.

<cs><col>Nom de guerre</col> (), <cd>literally, war name; hence, a fictitious name, or one assumed for a time.</cd> -- <col>Nom de plume</col> (), <cd>literally, pen name; hence, a name assumed by an author as his or her signature.</cd></cs>

Noma[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

NL., fr. Gr. , lit., a feeding. See Name

  1. (Med.): See Canker, n., 1.

Nomad[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L. <ets>nomas</ets>, <ets>-adis</ets>, Gr. , , pasturing, roaming without fixed home, fr. a pasture, allotted abode, fr. to distribute, allot, drive to pasture; prob. akin to AS. <ets>niman</ets> to take, and E. <ets>nimble</ets>: cf. F. <ets>nomade</ets>. Cf. Astronomy, Economy, Nimble, Nemesis, Numb, Number

  1. One of a race or tribe that has no fixed location, but wanders from place to place in search of pasture or game.

Nomad[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Roving; nomadic.

Nomade[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

F.]

  1. See Nomad, n.

Nomadian[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A nomad. (Rare)

Nomadic[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Gr. . See Nomad

  1. Of or pertaining to nomads, or their way of life; wandering; moving from place to place for subsistence; <as>as, a <ex>nomadic</ex> tribe</as>. -- <wordforms><wf>No*mad"ic*al*ly</wf> (#), adv.</wordforms>

Nomadism[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. The state of being a nomad.

Nomadize[edit]

v. i. <wordforms>[imp. & p. p. Nomadized ; p. pr. & vb. n. Nomadizing .]</wordforms> <def>To lead the life of a nomad; to wander with flocks and herds for the sake of finding pasturage.

The Vogules nomadize chiefly about the Rivers Irtish, Obi, Kama, and Volga. W. Tooke

Nomancy[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cf. F. <ets>nomancie</ets>, <ets>nomance</ets>, abbrev. fr. <ets>onomancie</ets>. See Onomancy

  1. The art or practice of divining the destiny of persons by the letters which form their names.

No-man's land[edit]

  1. (Naut.): A space amidships used to keep blocks, ropes, etc.; a space on a ship belonging to no one in particular to care for.
  1. Fig.: An unclaimed space or time.

That no-man's land of twilight. W. Black

Nomarch[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Gr. a district + <ets>-arch</ets>.]

  1. The chief magistrate of a nome or nomarchy.

Nomarchy[edit]

n.; <plu>pl. <plw>Nomarchies</plw> ().</plu> <def>A province or territorial division of a kingdom, under the rule of a nomarch, as in modern Greece; a nome.

Nombles[edit]

n. pl.

Etymology[edit]

F. <ets>nombles</ets>, fr. L. <ets>lumbulus</ets>, dim. of <ets>lumbus</ets> a loin. Cf. Numbles, Umbles, Humbles

  1. The entrails of a deer; the umbles. <altsp>[Written also <asp>numbles</asp>.]</altsp>

Johnson

Nombril[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

F. <ets>nombril</ets>, for OF. <ets>lombril</ets>, i. e., <ets>ombril</ets>, with the article, a dim. fr. L. <ets>umbilicus</ets> the navel. See Navel

  1. (Her.): A point halfway between the fess point and the middle base point of an escutcheon; -- called also <altname>navel point</altname>. See Escutcheon.

Nome[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Gr. , fr. to deal out, distribute.]

  1. A province or political division, as of modern Greece or ancient Egypt; a nomarchy.
  1. Any melody determined by inviolable rules. (Obsolete)

Nome[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cf. Binomial

  1. (Alg.)</fld> (Obsolete) <def>See Term.

Nome, Nomen[edit]

<hw>, obs. p. p. <def>of Nim.

Chaucer

Nomenclator[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L., fr. <ets>nomen</ets> name + <ets>calare</ets> to call. See Name, and Calendar

  1. One who calls persons or things by their names.

[[&hand; In Rome, candidates for office were attended each by a [[nomenclator, who informed the candidate of the names of the persons whom they met and whose votes it was desirable to solicit]]

  1. One who gives names to things, or who settles and adjusts the nomenclature of any art or science; also, a list or vocabulary of technical names.

Nomenclatress[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A female nomenclator.

Nomenclatural[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Pertaining or according to a nomenclature.

Nomenclature[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L. <ets>nomenclatura</ets>: cf. F. <ets>nomenclature</ets>. See Nomenclator

  1. A name. (Obsolete)

Bacon

  1. A vocabulary, dictionary, or glossary. (Rare)
  1. The technical names used in any particular branch of science or art, or by any school or individual; <as>as, the <ex>nomenclature</ex> of botany or of chemistry; the <ex>nomenclature</ex> of Lavoisier and his associates.</as>

Nomial[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cf. Binomial

  1. (Alg.): A name or term.

Nomic[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Gr. , fr. a law, custom.]

  1. Customary; ordinary; -- applied to the usual English spelling, in distinction from strictly phonetic methods. [[H Sweet. -- <def2>n. <def>Nomic spelling. [[A. J. Ellis.</def2>

Nominal[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L. <ets>nominalis</ets>, fr. <ets>nomen</ets>, <ets>nominis</ets>, name. See Name

  1. Of or pertaining to a name or names; having to do with the literal meaning of a word; verbal; <as>as, a <ex>nominal</ex> definition</as>.

Bp. Pearson

  1. Existing in name only; not real; <as>as, a <ex>nominal</ex> difference</as>. [[Nominal attendance on lectures."

Macaulay

Nominal[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. A nominalist. (Obsolete)

Camden

  1. (Gram.): A verb formed from a noun.
  1. A name; an appellation.

A is the nominal of the sixth note in the natural diatonic scale. [[Moore (Encyc. of Music. )

Nominalism[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. The principles or philosophy of the Nominalists.

Nominalist[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. (Metaph.): One of a sect of philosophers in the Middle Ages, who adopted the opinion of Roscelin, that general conceptions, or universals, exist in name only.

Reid

Nominalistic[edit]

Adjective[edit]

  1. Of or pertaining to the Nominalists.

Nominalize[edit]

v. t. <def>To convert into a noun. (Obsolete)

Nominally[edit]

adv. <def>In a nominal manner; by name; in name only; not in reality.

Burke

Nominate[edit]

v. t. <wordforms>[imp. & p. p. Nominated ; p. pr. & vb. n. Nominating .]</wordforms>

Etymology[edit]

L. <ets>nominatus</ets>, p. p. of <ets>nominare</ets> to nominate, fr. <ets>nomen</ets> name. See Name

  1. To mention by name; to name. (Obsolete)

To nominate them all, it is impossible. Shak

  1. To call; to entitle; to denominate. (Obsolete)

Spenser

  1. To set down in express terms; to state. (Obsolete)

Is it so noiminated in the bond? Shak

  1. To name, or designate by name, for an office or place; to appoint; esp., to name as a candidate for an election, choice, or appointment; to propose by name, or offer the name of, as a candidate for an office or place.

Nominately[edit]

adv. <def>By name; particularly; namely. (Obsolete)

Spelman

Nomination[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L. <ets>nominatio</ets>: cf. F. <ets>nomination</ets>.]

  1. The act of naming or nominating; designation of a person as a candidate for office; the power of nominating; the state of being nominated.

The nomination of persons to places being . . . a flower of his crown, he would reserve to himself. Clarendon

  1. The denomination, or name. (Obsolete)

Bp. Pearson

Nominator[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

L.]

  1. One who nominates.

Nominee[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See Nominate, and <er>-ee</er>.]

  1. A person named, or designated, by another, to any office, duty, or position; one nominated, or proposed, by others for office or for election to office.

Nominor[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See Nominate, and <er>-or</er>.]

  1. A nominator. (Obsolete)

Bentham

Nomocracy[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Gr. law + <ets>-cracy</ets>, as in demo<ets>cracy</ets>.]

  1. Government in accordance with a system of law.

Milman

Nomography[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Gr. ; law + to write.]

  1. A treatise on laws; an exposition of the form proper for laws.

nomology[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Gr. law + <ets>-logy</ets>.]

  1. The science of law; legislation.
  2. The science of the laws of the mind; rational psychology.

Nomopelmous[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Gr. law, custom + sole of the foot.]

  1. (Zoöl.): Having a separate and simple tendon to flex the first toe, or hallux, as do passerine birds.

Nomothete[edit]

Noun[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Gr. ; + to assign: cf. F. <ets>nomoth\'8ate</ets>.]

  1. A lawgiver. (Rare)