Arthur

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the name of the legendary king, probably related to Proto-Celtic *artos (bear). Further suggestions include Old Welsh arth (bear) and ur (man). Latin origin has also been suggested.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Arthur

  1. A male given name.
    • 1380s-1390s, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales: The Wife of Bath’s Prologue and Tale
      In tholde dayes of the king Arthour, / Of which that Britons speken greet honour, / All was this land fulfild of fayerye.
    • 1596, William Shakespeare, The Life and Death of King John, Act IV: Act IV, Scene II:
      Young Arthur is alive: this hand of mine / Is yet a maiden and an innocent hand, / Not painted with the crimson spots of blood.
    • 1951 Graham Greene, The End of the Affair, Viking Press, page 96:
      "Is his name Arthur?" "Arthur James." "It’s quite an old-fashioned name." "We’re an old-fashioned family. His mother was fond of Tennyson."
    • 1966 Patrick White, The Solid Mandala, Avon Books (1975), ISBN 0380003759, page 270:
      "It will not be his only name," Mr. Saporta said, and his glance hoped he had found an acceptable solution. " We shall also call him 'Aaron'. That will be his Jewish name. But for everyday purposes—Arthur."
  2. A patronymic surname​.
  3. A village in Illinois
  4. A city in Iowa
  5. A rural municipality in Manitoba, Canada
  6. A village in Nebraska
  7. A ghost town in Nevada
  8. A city in North Dakota
  9. A town and a community in Wisconsin

Usage notes[edit]

  • In continuous use as a given name since early Middle Ages. Popular in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Danish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Arthur

  1. A male given name borrowed from English.

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English.

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Particularly: “verify”

Proper noun[edit]

Arthur ?

  1. A male given name

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Equivalent to English Arthur, used in France since the Middle Ages.

Proper noun[edit]

Arthur

  1. A male given name.
    • 1862 Victor Hugo, Les Misérables, Vol.1, Book 4:1, translation 1887 by Isabel F. Hapgood:
      Il n’est pas rare aujourd’hui que le garçon bouvier se nomme Arthur, Alfred ou Alphonse, et que le vicomte — s’il y a encore des vicomtes — se nomme Thomas, Pierre ou Jacques. Ce déplacement qui met le nom « élégant » sur le plébéien et le nom campagnard sur l’aristocrate n’est autre chose qu’un remous d’égalité. L’irrésistible pénétration du souffle nouveau est là comme en tout.
      It is not rare for the neatherd's boy nowadays to bear the name of Arthur, Alfred, or Alphonse, and for the vicomte--if there are still any vicomtes--to be called Thomas, Pierre, or Jacques. This displacement, which places the "elegant" name on the plebeian and the rustic name on the aristocrat, is nothing else than an eddy of equality. The irresistible penetration of the new inspiration is there as everywhere else.

Related terms[edit]


German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Arthur

  1. A male given name borrowed from English in the 18th century.

Norman[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Arthur m

  1. A male given name

Norwegian[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Arthur

  1. A male given name borrowed from English in the 19th century.