Baldur

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: baldur and -baldur

English[edit]

Baldur by Johannes Gehrts, 1901
Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Baldur

  1. (Norse mythology) The Norse god of light and purity, a son of Odin and Freya, known for his beauty and near-invulnerability.
    • 1836, The Foreign Quarterly Review, Volume 16, page 443,
      But the fate of Baldur, the most amiable and beloved of Asa gods, is, we think, by far the most pleasing of the Scandinavian Myths, although less characteristic of the warlike temper just mentioned than some of the others.
    • 1993, Rudolf Steiner, Apocalypse of Saint John, page 99,
      In the god Baldur the legend recognizes the god of the earth-sun, the earth force. No being of the earth can approach him with hostility. Hence also the god whom the German legend knew to be a straggler, namely Loki, cannot kill Baldur with anything belonging to the earth; he has to kill him with a branch of mistletoe, because this is a stranger among the creations of the earth, and for this reason can serve the straggler, Loki, who is not related to the earth gods.
    • 1997, Philip Schaff, History of the Christian Church, Volume IV: Mediaeval Christianity, A.D. 590—1093, unnumbered page,
      A transition from the myth of Baldur to the gospel of Christ cannot have been very difficult to the Scandinavian imagination; and, indeed, it is apparent that the first ideas which the Scandinavian heathens formed of the “White Christ” were influenced by their ideas of Baldur.
    • 2008, Alan Gregory, Quenching Hell: The Mystical Theology of William Law, page 84,
      The variety of myths prohibits a single answer, but of biblical myths and myths such as The Epic of Gilgamesh, Baldur’s death, the love of Isis and Osiris, and Prometheus, it is accurate to say that they "are marked by their relevance to men's questions about their nature and place in the universe."

Faroese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old Norse Baldr, from the adjective baldr (brave), compare Faroese baldur (good, beautiful).

Proper noun[edit]

Baldur m

  1. the Norse god
  2. A male given name

Usage notes[edit]

Patronymics

  • son of Baldur: Baldursson
  • daughter Baldur: Baldursdóttir

Declension[edit]

Singular
Indefinite
Nominative Baldur
Accusative Baldur
Dative Baldri
Genitive Baldurs

Related terms[edit]


German[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Baldur

  1. A male given name.

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse Baldr from the adjective baldr (brave), confer the Icelandic adjective baldur (bold).

Proper noun[edit]

Baldur m (genitive singular Baldurs, no plural)

  1. Baldur, one of the Norse gods, son of Odin and Freya, known for his beauty and near-invulnerability.
  2. A male given name

Usage notes[edit]

A son's patronymic name
Baldursson
Son of Baldur.
A daughter's patronymic name
Baldursdóttir
Daughter of Baldur.

Related terms[edit]