Citations:be

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English citations of be

Verb[edit]

  • 1827, Antonio Vieyra, A Portuguese grammar: with the Portuguese words properly accented according to the lastest and best authorities., Printed for J. Collingwood, page 45:
    The auxiliary verbs are so called, because they aid the conjugation of other verbs. They are four in Portuguese, viz havêr, têr, to have; sêr, estár, to be.

Verb: to exist[edit]

  • 1526, Bible, tr. William Tyndale, Matthew 2:
    Rachel wepynge ffor her chyldren, and wolde nott be comforted because they were not.
  • c. 1600, William Shakespeare, Hamlet:
    To be or not to be, that is the question.
  • 2000, João Costa, Portuguese syntax: new comparative studies, edition illustrated, Oxford University Press US, ISBN 9780195125757, page 65:
    Portuguese, however, is slightly different from Catalan, Spanish, and Romanian in that there is no strict adjacency requirement between wh-words and the verbal cluster in indirect questions.
  • 2003, Amélia P. Hutchinson, Janet Lloyd, Portuguese: an essential grammar, edition 2, illustrated, Routledge, ISBN 9780415308175, page 206:
    There are some pronunciation and spelling variations among European Portuguese, Brazilian and even African Portuguese.
  • 2005, Steve Bourie, American Casino Guide, Casino Vacations Press, ISBN 9781883768157, page 92:
    When deciding how to play your hand there are also three other options available to you besides standing or hitting. The first is called doubling down and most casinos will allow a player to double their bet on their first two cards and draw only one more card.

Verb: forms the passive voice[edit]

  • 1827, Antonio Vieyra, A Portuguese grammar: with the Portuguese words properly accented according to the lastest and best authorities., Printed for J. Collingwood, page 45:
    The auxiliary verbs are so called, because they aid the conjugation of other verbs. They are four in Portuguese, viz havêr, têr, to have; sêr, estár, to be.
  • 1934 October 1934, “Esperanto — A Tongue All Men Can Easily Learn”, The Rotarian, volume 45, Rotary International, ISSN 0035-838X, page 48: 
    Furthermore, by learning difficult foreign languages, the pupil is overburdened in contrast to the ease with which he could acquire Esperanto.
  • 1991, Tom E. Kakonis, Double down: Tom Kakonis[1], Dutton, ISBN 9780525933267, page 217:
    Somewhat relutanctly, Caroline pushed her second stack out alongside the first and said "Double down" and another ace was laid on her hand.
  • 1995, C. K. Ogden, Psyche: An Annual General and Linguistic Psychology 1920-1952, C. K. Ogden, ISBN 9780415127790, page 13:
    Study courses of Esperanto and Ido have been broadcast.
  • 2005, Mike Turner, Bootlegger's 200 proof blackjack, Square One Publishers, ISBN 9780757000485, page 3:
    He knows to handle double-down opportunities and what to do with hands that should be split.
  • 2005, Steve Bourie, American Casino Guide, Casino Vacations Press, ISBN 9781883768157, page 92:
    When deciding how to play your hand there are also three other options available to you besides standing or hitting. The first is called doubling down and most casinos will allow a player to double their bet on their first two cards and draw only one more card.
  • 2007, Colin R. Bruce, Thomas Michael, Standard Catalog of World Coins 1901-2000, edition 35, illustrated, F+W Media, ISBN 9780896895003, page 19:
    Coins of Thailand (Slam) are found dated by three different eras. The most predominant is the Buddhist Era (BE), which originated in 534 BC.
  • 2008, Helen Fryer, The Esperanto Teacher, BiblioBazaar, LLC, ISBN 9780554320076, page 13:
    In Esperanto each letter has only one sound, and each sound is represented in only one way. The words are pronounced exactly as spelt, every letter being sounded.
  • 2008, “Music history of Portugal”, English Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation:
    Luiz de Freitas Branco (1890-1955) is usually appointed as the «introducer of modernism in Portugal», by his decisive role in the approximation of Portuguese music to the most innovative European aesthetics, namely the Schönberg atonalism and the French impressionism.

Verb: forms continuous tenses[edit]

  • 1995, C. K. Ogden, Psyche: An Annual General and Linguistic Psychology 1920-1952, C. K. Ogden, ISBN 9780415127790, page 13:
    In the possibility of radio uses of a constructed language — and such experiments are proving successful — vast sums of money and untold social forces may be involved.

Verb: connects a noun to an adjective that describes it[edit]

  • 1966, Alexander R. Prista, Essential Portuguese grammar, Courier Dover Publications, ISBN 9780486216508, page 6:
    It will help you to expand your Portuguese vocabulary if you remember that many Portuguese words are similar in meaning and appearance to English words.
  • 1990, Ellen Israel Rosen, Bitter Choices: Blue-Collar Women in and Out of Work, edition reprint, illustrated, University of Chicago Press, ISBN 9780226726458, page 80:
    [...] with a good deal of prejudice that was in part motivated by the fear that the Portuguese women might take their jobs.
  • 2000, João Costa, Portuguese syntax: new comparative studies, edition illustrated, Oxford University Press US, ISBN 9780195125757, page 65:
    Portuguese, however, is slightly different from Catalan, Spanish, and Romanian in that there is no strict adjacency requirement between wh-words and the verbal cluster in indirect questions.
  • 2007, Colin R. Bruce, Thomas Michael, Standard Catalog of World Coins 1901-2000, edition 35, illustrated, F+W Media, ISBN 9780896895003, page 19:
    Coins of Thailand (Slam) are found dated by three different eras. The most predominant is the Buddhist Era (BE), which originated in 534 BC.

Verb: indicates that the subject has the qualities described by a noun or noun phrase[edit]

  • 1827, Antonio Vieyra, A Portuguese grammar: with the Portuguese words properly accented according to the lastest and best authorities., Printed for J. Collingwood, page 45:
    The auxiliary verbs are so called, because they aid the conjugation of other verbs. They are four in Portuguese, viz havêr, têr, to have; sêr, estár, to be.
  • 1966, George Alan Connor, Esperanto, the world interlanguage[2], T. Yoseloff, page 116:
    A helpful booklet for philatelists is the Filatela terminaro, by Herbert M. Scott, 3rd edition published by the Universal Esperanto Association in 1945.
  • 2004, Steven Roger Fischer, A history of language, Reaktion Books, ISBN 9781861890801, page 180:
    The first practical constructed language was the south-west German Pastor Schleyer's Volapük from 1879; its complicated grammar and irregular vocabulary made learning difficult, however. The most successful has been Esperanto, devised by the Warsaw ophthalmologist Ludwig Zamenhof in 1887, that today can count some one million speakers.
  • 2004, Steven Roger Fischer, A history of language, Reaktion Books, ISBN 9781861890801, page 180:
    The first practical constructed language was the south-west German Pastor Schleyer's Volapük from 1879; its complicated grammar and irregular vocabulary made learning difficult, however. The most successful has been Esperanto, devised by the Warsaw ophthalmologist Ludwig Zamenhof in 1887, that today can count some one million speakers.
  • 2005, Steve Bourie, American Casino Guide, Casino Vacations Press, ISBN 9781883768157, page 7:
    This is your best casino game, but you must learn how to play your hands (when to hit, stand, double-down, split, etc.)
  • 2008, Geoffrey Sutton, Concise Encyclopedia of the Original Literature of Esperanto, Mondial, ISBN 9781595690906, page 572:
    For him Esperanto is principally a language of poetry, which he uses to express his feelings and thoughts.

Verb: forms the perfect aspect[edit]

  • 1850, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, The Blessed Damozel, lines 67-68
    ‘I wish that he were come to me, / For he will come,’ she said.
  • 1922, A. E. Housman, Last Poems XXV, line 13
    The King with half the East at heel is marched from lands of morning;

English citations of BE

Proper noun: abbreviation of Belgium[edit]

  • 2007, USA International Business Publications, Ibp Usa, Andorra Business Law Handbook, edition 5, Int'l Business Publications, ISBN 9781433001048, page 156:
    Belgium [...] Official name: Kingdom of Belgium [...] ISO 3166 country codes: BE, BEL, 056
  • 2008, Anne-Lise Arnesen, Policies and practices for teaching sociocultural diversity: report on the survey on initial education of teachers in sociocultural diversity, Council of Europe, ISBN 9789287164407, page 28:
    This study is based on 16 reports: [...] Belgium (French Community) (BE) [...] Sweden (SE) [...] Ukraine (UA)

Proper noun: abbreviation of Buddhist Era[edit]

  • 2007, Colin R. Bruce, Thomas Michael, Standard Catalog of World Coins 1901-2000, edition 35, illustrated, F+W Media, ISBN 9780896895003, page 19:
    Coins of Thailand (Slam) are found dated by three different eras. The most predominant is the Buddhist Era (BE), which originated in 534 BC.

Old French citations of be

Adjective, bay (color)?[edit]

  • circa 1170, Chrétien de Troyes, Érec et Énide:
    Chevaliers i ot bien cinc çanz
    Sor chevaus bes, sors et bauçanz.
    There were at least five hundred knights
    On horses bay,[?] and pied