Citations:even Jove nods

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English citations of even Jove nods

  • 1879: Philip Abraham, Curiosities of Judaism: Facts, Opinions, Anecdotes, and Remarks Relative to the Hebrew Nation, page 219 (self-published)
    […] nor would the punctilious Jew of York have eaten of the Christian’s pottage and “seethed kid,” even to have averted the most bitter pangs of hunger. But “even Jove nods sometimes.”
  • 1885: The Academy, issue 27, page 336 (J. Murray)
    Mr. Comer’s magic contribution — “Near Burley” — a “Burley” of the New Forest, it would seem — has the manliness of method and the force of tone which are notes of his art: only it is а little less fascinating than the “Two green paths across a common wide” of a year or so ago. Even Jove nods.
  • 1896: Lilian Bell, The Under Side of Things, pages 177–178 (Harper & Brothers)
    In seating themselves on the boat-house steps, Gordon had no difficulty in placing himself beside Alice. He only needed half a chance; but no unwarned man is a suitable antagonist for a predetermined woman. Besides that, it is said that even Jove nods upon occasions; but if Venus ever did, the record has been lost.
  • 1897: Colonial Mobile: An historical study, largely from original sources, of the Alabama-Tombigbee basin from the discovery of Mobile bay in 1519 until the demolition of Fort Charlotte in 1821, page 384 (Houghton Mifflin and Company)
    The Fortieth sailed shortly afterwards for Europe, and at Waterloo were under the personal command of Wellington himself. But even Jove nods, and the lieutenant of the great regiment must have mixed his notes.
  • 1903: Factory and Industrial Management, volume 24, page 760 (McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, Inc.)
    To err is human, and even Jove nods. But it certainly seems unnecessary to go out of the way to invent and elaborately embroider stories so grotesque as this.
  • 1905: J. R. Lemen, in Medical Review, volumes 51–52, page 33 (St. Louis Medical Review Association)
    I am always interested in the editorials that appear in your columns, because they display such an individualistic character. But even Jove nods at times, and when you quote
    There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, Than are dreamt of in our philosophy
    are you not in error? Look up your Hamlet, please, and see if it should not be “your philosophy.”
  • 1905, October: Orison Swett Marden, Choosing a Career, page 315 (Braunworth & Co.)
    It is said that even Jove nods; the paying teller must never nod, since he is beset with opportunities to make mistakes, a single one of which may cost the bank a great deal of money and him his place and chances of advancement.
  • 1913: The Chautauquan, volume 70, page 68 (M. Bailey)
    Marie Louise came to Paris a frightened girl, for Napoleon had no reputation for gentleness, but she seems to have found him endurable. It is even related that at one time when he caught her experimenting with the making of an omelette he gave yet one more instance of his omniscience by playfully teaching her how to prepare it. That he dropped it on the floor would seem to prove that even Jove nods.
  • 1922: Laurance Lyon, The Pomp of Power, page 197 (G. H. Doran Co.)
    But even Jove nods at odd moments.
  • 1933: Time, volume 22, issues 14–26, page 10 (self-published)
    Time usually is correct in its statements but we have classical authority that even Jove nods occasionally.
  • 1954: Fredric Brown, Angels and Spaceships, page 218 (Dutton)
    Even Jove nods.
    Only Jove doesn’t wear a headband like the one I still had on. Or maybe, come to think of it, he does. It would explain a lot of things.
  • 1984: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, volume 66, page 29 (Mercury Press)
    But even Jove nods, and so must DAW: P. 125: “…unpeeled her uniform….” Really?
  • 1997: Harry Turtledove, How Few Remain, page 547 (Del Rey/Ballantine Books; ISBN 0345416619, 9780345416612)
    Even Jove nods,” Roosevelt said, which meant nothing to the storekeeper. Grunting, Roosevelt carried the full milk cans out to the wagon.