Citations:horilka

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English citations of horilka

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  • 1846, Eusèbe Salverte, Philosophy of Magic Prodigies and Apparent Miracles, Adamant Media corporation (2005), ISBN 1-4212-9117-7, p 304:
    Traces of this communication exist, if we admit the ingenious inferences, by which Schulz endeavors to establish, that the liqueur of Scythia, the Scythicus latex of Democritus, was nothing else than alcohol, the Polish name of which, gorzalka,* recalls the name chrusoloucos (κρυσολουκος), given it by the ancients."
    [footnote referring to "gorzalka"] In Sclavonia, gorilka or horilka . . . In Slavonian and in Polish, gore signifies a thing that burns; the termination ’lka indicates a diminutive.
  • 1914, Nadine Jarintzov, Russia, the Country of Extremes, p 361:
    Horilka. A name in the little-Russian dialect for the grain-spirit, called vodka further north.
  • 1931, Ekaterina Konstantinovna Breshko-Breshkovskaia, Lincoln Hutchinson ed., Hidden Springs of the Russian Revolution: Personal Memoirs of Katerina Breshkovskaia, Stanford University Press, pp 32, 359:
    32: In return for a glass of horilka he took us to the other end of the village, showed us an empty hut, and introduced us to its owner.
    359 [glossary]: horilka  Ukrainian name for vodka.
  • 1942, in Journal of central European affairs, p 203:
    There are many pages devoted to details doubtless pleasing to the average reader, but which the reviewer fears might create an erroneous impression of the Ukraine as a land of idyllic freedom accompanied by feasts with an abundant flow of "horilka," more commonly known as vodka
  • 1951, "Ukrainian Borrowings in Northern Russian", in Annals of the Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences in the United States, pp 85–6:
    On the whole, however, Ukrainians remained faithful to their national horilka. When used in Russian, even in its Russianized form gorelka, it has always Ukrainian flavor.
  • 1958, Annals of the Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences in the U.S., v 6, p 86:
    On the whole, however, Ukrainians remained faithful to their national horilka. When used in Russian, even in its Russianized form gorelka, it has always Ukrainian flavor. Therefore its occurrence in the North, in the early seventeenth century, is highly interesting, both from the cultural and linguistic point of view.
  • 1962, Avrahm Yarmolinsky, Road to Revolution: A Century of Russian Radicalism, Collier, p 197:
    Finally, when the organization had been in existence nine months and at a time when preparations for the rising had not yet started, the police discovered the conspiracy owing to the indiscretion of a member while under the influence of horilka (brandy).
  • 1963, Carl Bickford O’Brien, Muscovy and the Ukraine: From the Pereiaslavl Agreement to the Truce of Andrusovo 1654–1667, pp 16, 133:
    The hauteur of the Polish delegates at Pereiaslavl and the bravado of the Cossacks under the influence of horílka, the native alcoholic beverage, tended to reinforce this conviction.
  • 1969, George Vernadsky and Michael Karpovich, The Tsardom of Moscow, 1547–1682, A History of Russia, v 5, New Haven: Yale University Press, p 494:
    Bogdan's two daughters served the food. The drinks were horilka (vodka) and mead, which the envoy was afraid to swallow, supposing (rightly) that the beverages were quite strong.
  • 1970, Natalia M. Kolb-Seletski, “ Gastronomy, Gogol, and His Fiction”, in Slavic Review, vol 29, no 1 (March 1970), p 38:
    These traditional Ukrainian dishes—like the Ukrainisms (kavun, horilka, tsybulia, bublyk) that have their Russian equivalents—are mentioned to provide local color.
  • 1972, Wolodymyr T. Zyla, “A Ukrainian Version of the Aeneid: Ivan Kotljarevs’kyj’s Enejida”, in Classical Journal, vol 67, no 3 (February–March 1972), p 196:
    They were quarreling and drinking “horilka” (vodka) and Zeus drank “syvuxu tak, jak brahu” (raw brandy as if it were homebrewed beer).
  • 1988, Orest Subtelny, Ukraine: A History, University of Toronto (2000), ISBN 0-8020-5808-6, p 179:
    However, the most profitable sideline for entrepreneurs among the nobility was the distillation of wheat-based spirits (horilka), the sale of which earned many nobles as much as 50% of their cash income.
  • 1993, Michael F. Hamm, Kiev: A Portrait, 1800–1917, Princeton University Press, pp 13–14:
    In the eighteenth century the mayor received one hundred vedros of horilka (distilled spirits), mead, and beer annually, as well as one hundred pine logs, one hundred carts of firewood, and hay, and more spirits at Christmas and Easter.
  • 1995, Yale Richmond, From Da to Yes: Understanding the East Europeans, Yarmouth, Maine: Intercultural Press, ISBN 1-877864-30-7, p 280:
    Horilka (vodka) is the drink of choice, as in Poland and Russia.
  • 1997, Anna Reid, Borderland: A Journey Through the History of Ukraine, Boulder: Westview Press (2000), ISBN 0-8133-3792-5, pp 30, 31:
    30: They danced, sang and drank horilka in heroic quantities.
    31: Symbol of freedom for generations of Ukrainians, it was where the wildest outlaws gathered, the most daring raids were plotted, and the most horilka drunk.
  • 2001, Roman Solchanyk, Ukraine and Russia: The Post-Soviet Transition, Oxford: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, ISBN 0-7425-1018-2, p 23:
    After two hundred or so years of viewing Ukrainians as sort of amusing country folk who are good at dancing and singing and who relish horilka with pork fat, “when talking to a Ukrainian you somehow exaggeratedly try to demonstrate that things Ukrainian (language, culture, statehood) do not strike you as amusing.”
  • 2002, Vitaly Chernetsky, untitled review of Ol’ha Kobylians’ka, On Sunday Morning She Gathered Herbs, in Slavic and East European Journal, vol 46, no 3 (Autumn 2002), p 609:
    There are also some unusual or awkward translations, such as the rendering of “horilka” (Ukrainian vodka) as “whiskey” (8), or of a raven as a “black crow” (43).
  • 2002, Romko Malko, “Ukrainian Horilka: more than just an alcoholic beverage”, in Welcome to Ukraine magazine.
    “And bring us a lot of horilka, but not of that fancy kind with raisins, or with any other such things — bring us horilka of the purest kind, give us that demon drink that makes us merry, playful and wild!” from Taras Bulba by Mykola Gogol
  • 2004, Natalie Kononenko, “Karaoke Ivan Kupalo: Ritual in Post-Soviet Ukraine”, in Slavic and East European Journal, vol 48, no 2 (Summer 2004), p 194:
    To give just one example, nothing could be either given to or received from the bride and groom with a bare hand, and a kerchief or a handkerchief was used to give gifts to the couple and to accept horilka [vodka] and korovai [wedding bread] from them.
  • 2004, Andrew Evans, Ukraine, Bradt Travel Guides, ISBN 978-184162-099-2, p 164:
    All holidays, birthdays, weddings (and funerals) are celebrated with horilka (vodka).
  • 2005, Jim Slobodzian, Ramiel, Angel in Ruins, James Douglas Media, ISBN 0-9738605-0-2, pp 50, 51:
    50: One time the local cops paid him a visit, a mid-week raid on his farm and they managed to find a glass jar of “horilka” in his chicken coop.
    51: Old-man Metro brewed horilka somewhere in the scraggly bush on his farm and although everyone knew about it, no one in the country breathed a word.
  • 2005, Patricia Telesco, Kitchen Witch's Guide to Brews and Potions, Franklin Lakes, NJ: Career Press, ISBN 1-56414-790-8, p 176:
    Continue to monitor your horilka even after the alcohol is added as I have had batches that continue to ferment, meaning certain precautions must be taken with your bottling techniques.
  • 2007, Elmore Leonard, Up in Honey's Room: A Novel, New York: HarperCollins :Publishers, ISBN 978-0-06-072424-5, p 283:
    I hid a razor-sharp butter knife up my butt and used it to cut the throats of three death-squad SS guards, each one in turn lying drunk on horilka, Ukrainian vodka. I put my hand over each one's mouth, stuck the knife into the throat and cut."


English citations of gorilka

1846
1886
1899
1925
1988
2000
2001
2003
2006
2008
ME « 15th c. 16th c. 17th c. 18th c. 19th c. 20th c. 21st c.
  • 1846, Eusèbe Salverte, Philosophy of Magic Prodigies and Apparent Miracles, Adamant Media corporation (2005), ISBN 1-4212-9117-7, p 304
    Traces of this communication exist, if we admit the ingenious inferences, by which Schulz endeavors to establish, that the liqueur of Scythia, the Scythicus latex of Democritus, was nothing else than alcohol, the Polish name of which, gorzalka,* recalls the name chrusoloucos (κρυσολουκος), given it by the ancients."
    [footnote referring to "gorzalka"] In Sclavonia, gorilka or horilka . . . In Slavonian and in Polish, gore signifies a thing that burns; the termination ’lka indicates a diminutive.
  • 1886, Nikolai Gogol, Taras Bulba, Adamant Media Corporation (2006), ISBN 1-4212-9788-4.
    9: We don't want any pampushke, honey-cakes, poppy-cakes, or any other messes: bring us a whole sheep, give us a goat, mead forty years old, and as much gorilka* as possible, not with raisins and all sorts of stuff, but plain flaming gorilka, which foams and hisses like mad.
    [footnote] * Corn-brandy
    11: What's gorilka in Latin? Come, my son, the Latins were stupid: they did not know there was such a thing in the world as gorilka.
  • 1899, Leo Tolstoy, The Cossacks, Sevastopol, the Invaders, and Other Stories, New York: Thomas Y. Crowell & Co., p 68.
    Captain Kraft called for some vodka, which he called corn-brandy,* and threw back his head, and made a terrible noise like a duck, in draining the glass.
    [footnote] * Gorilka, in the Malo-Russian dialect.
  • 1925, Harold Lamb, Howard Andrew Jones ed., “Bogatyr”, in Riders of the Steppes: The Complete Cossack Adventures, Volume Three, University of Nebraska (2007), ISBN 978-0-8032-8050-2, p 276.
    “...When we send for wine, you take a cask of mead up to the castle and save the gorilka to pour down your own stems.”
  • 1988, Laurence Urdang and Frank R. Abate, Loanwords Dictionary: A Lexicon of More Than 6,500 Words and Phrases Encountered In English Contexts That Are Not Fully Assimilated Into English and retain a measure of their foreign orthography, pronunciation, or flavor, Gale Research, ISBN 0-8103-1543-2, p 130.
    gorilka (Ukrainian) vodka flavored with pepper.
  • 2000, R. Morgan Lund, Nonrenewable Resources, Xlibris Corporation, ISBN 0-7388-2597-2, p 133.
    They selected a small corner booth and Mack ordered two gorilkas, pepper flavored vodka, deciding that a stiff drink would do them both good.
  • 2000, Antarctica, Lonely Planet (2005), ISBN 978-1740590945, p 225.
    Sample the gorilka, a tongue-burning pepper vodka made locally.
  • 2001, Dan Richardson, The Rough Guide to Moscow, London: Rough Guides (2001), p 348.
    The menu lists two kinds of borshch, four varieties of vareniki (dumplings) and five types of salo (lard) as starters, with suckling pig, chicken or rabbit to follow, accompanied by gorilka (Ukranian [sic] vodka) and folk music after 7pm.
  • 2003, Nicholas Ermochkine and Peter Iglikowski, 40 Degrees East: An Anatomy of Vodka, New York: Nova Science Publishers, ISBN 1-59033-594-5, p 165.
    The original Ukrainian word for vodka is gorilka (pronounced horylka – burning water, the same as Polish gorzalka, and nothing to do with gorillas). In a characteristic gesture of defiance to all things Russian, emboldened by their post independent aspirations to assert ethnic originality, the Ukrainian vodka-producers removed the word vodka from Ukrainian labels, replacing it with the ancestral gorilka. Don't be surprised to find in Kiev the likes of Stolychna gorilka.
  • 2006, Richard Segal, Trilogy Year, BookSurge, ISBN 1-4196-2366-4, p 172.
    I recall the total aroma experience of NoDoz on an empty stomach, chased down by a cocktail of smoky black tea, strong coffee and gorilka.
  • 2008, Elizabeth Wilson, Rostropovich: The Musical Life of the Great Cellist, Teacher, and Legend, Ivan R. Dee, ISBN 978-1566637763, p 228
    A feast had been prepared, with a table groaning with national dishes and Gorilka (Ukrainian vodka, spiced up by a hot pepper inserted into the bottle); even Rostropovich found it difficult to keep up with the toasts.

English citations of ghorilka

1976
1980
1983
ME « 15th c. 16th c. 17th c. 18th c. 19th c. 20th c. 21st c.
  • 1976, Victor E. Louis and Jennifer M. Louis, The Complete Guide to the Soviet Union, Michael Joseph, p 25:
    There are other kinds too, including Tminaya (caraway flavour), lemon vodka, Zveroboy (animal killer), Ahotnichaya vodka (hunters’ vodka), Ghorilka s pertsem (Ukrainian vodka with peppers in it), and one of the best is Yubileinaya (Jubilee).
  • 1980, Mark McGarrity, A Passing Advantage, Rawson, Wade, p 17:
    Without conscious thought, Kork took the small glass of dark brown Ghorilka from Alexeyev and tossed it off. It was an especially strong Ukrainian vodka and only the old soldiers in the Guards drank it.
  • 1983, Craig Thomas, Snow Falcon, Bantam Books, p 293:
    When he had finished his coffee and a glass of Ghorilka [. . .]