Citations:war-wood

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English citations of war-wood

Noun: "(poetic) a spear or shield"[edit]

1855 1887 1889 1910
ME « 15th c. 16th c. 17th c. 18th c. 19th c. 20th c. 21st c.
  • 1855, Beowulf, translated by Benjamin Thorpe, in The Anglo-Saxon Poems of Beowulf, The Scôp or Gleeman's Tale, and The Fight at Finnesburg, James Wright (1855), page 84:
    [] there on the bench was, over the noble, easy to be seen his high martial helm, his ringed byrnie, and war-wood stout.
  • 1855, The Fight at Finnesburg, translated by Benjamin Thorpe, in The Anglo-Saxon Poems of Beowulf, The Scôp or Gleeman's Tale, and The Fight at Finnesburg, James Wright (1855), page 227:
    [] the birds sing, the cricket chirps, the war-wood resounds, shield to shaft responds.
  • 1887, William Morrow, The Story of Sigurd the Volsung and the Fall of the Niblungs, Ellis White (1887), page 362:
    And the war-cries ran together, and no man his brother knew,
    And the dead men loaded the living, as he went the war-wood through;
  • 1889, Cynewulf, Elene, translated by James M. Garnett, in Elene; Judith; Athelstan, or the Fight at Brunanburh; and Byrhtnoth, or the Fight at Maldon: Anglo-Saxon Poems, Ginn & Company (1889), page 2:
    They rode 'round the valiant: then rattled the shield,
    The war-wood clanged: the king with host marched,
  • 1910, Beowulf, translated by Francis B. Gummere, in Epic and Saga: Beowolf, The Song of Roland, The Destruction of Da Derga's Hostel, The Story of the Volsungs and Niblungs (ed. Charles W. Eliot), P. F. Collier & Son (1910), page 57:
    by word and by work, that well I may serve thee,
    wielding the war-wood to win thy triumph