Croton

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See also: croton

Translingual[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

New Latin, from Ancient Greek κροτών (krotṓn, tick, from the size and shape of the seed)

Proper noun[edit]

Croton m

  1. A taxonomic genus within the family Euphorbiaceae — many Asiatic shrubs, the source of croton oil.

Hypernyms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

External links[edit]


English[edit]

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A map of the Croton river's drainage basin.

Etymology[edit]

The river is now named for the chief of the group which lived along it; it was formerly named after the group itself, the Kitchawan (a subdivision of the Mohegan).[1] The river feeds the Croton Reservoir in Croton-on-Hudson, which feeds the Croton Aqueduct, which supplies water to New York City, hence the metonymic sense.

Early spellings of the name include Scroton.[2]

Proper noun[edit]

Croton

  1. A river in southern New York.
  2. (dated) The water supply of New York City. [from 1840]
    • 1869, “Annual report of the Department of Public Charities of the City of New York”, page 178: 
      The pumps now draw water from this tank, instead of from the "Croton main" as formerly.
    • 1891, Transactions of the Royal Institute of British Architects, page 364: 
      The water, supplied from the "Croton" main at the 68th Street side of the building, is connected by two pipes: one for direct service, and the other to supply a hot-air engine, which forces the water to the tank at the top of the house for a high or indirect service.
    • 1895 June 29, “THE POOR WATER SUPPLY; Business Men Alarmed by The New-York Times Exposures”, New York Times:
      New York Cotton Exchange - A pressure of about 14 pounds from the Croton main

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Native New Yorkers: The Legacy of the Algonquin People of New York
  2. ^ Robert S. Grumet, Manhattan to Minisink: American Indian Place Names (2013, ISBN 0806189134) notes that that spelling, Scroton, is found in a 1696 document