Croton

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See also: croton

Translingual[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

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Proper noun[edit]

Croton m

  1. A taxonomic genus within the tribe Crotoneae — many Asiatic shrubs, the source of croton oil.

Hypernyms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

External links[edit]


English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From the name New York City's water supply, the Croton Aqueduct, which supplied water from the Croton Reservoir in Croton-on-Hudson.

Proper noun[edit]

Croton

  1. (dated) The water supply of New York City. [from 1840]
    • 1869, “Annual report of the Department of Public Charities of the City of New York”, page 178: 
      The pumps now draw water from this tank, instead of from the "Croton main" as formerly.
    • 1891, Transactions of the Royal Institute of British Architects, page 364: 
      The water, supplied from the "Croton" main at the 68th Street side of the building, is connected by two pipes: one for direct service, and the other to supply a hot-air engine, which forces the water to the tank at the top of the house for a high or indirect service.
    • 1895 June 29, “THE POOR WATER SUPPLY; Business Men Alarmed by The New-York Times Exposures”, New York Times:
      New York Cotton Exchange - A pressure of about 14 pounds from the Croton main

Noun[edit]

Croton (plural Crotons)

  1. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) (New York City, historical) The main water supply pipe to a building or apartment
    • 1879 September 26, “ROWELL FAR IN ADVANCE; AN EXCITING STRUGGLE FOR SECOND”, New York Times:
      beer was flowing out of the kegs like water out of a broken Croton pipe.

Derived terms[edit]