Edith

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Édith

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old English ēad + gȳð (war, strife, battle). Name of a 10th century English saint.

Proper noun[edit]

Edith

  1. A female given name.
    • 1809 Charles and Mary Lamb, Poetry for Children: Choosing a Name:
      Edith's pretty, but it looks / Better in old English books.
    • 1903 Elizabeth Bisland, A Candle of Understanding, Harper&Brothers 1903, page 11:
      But suppose she had had an elder sister with a beautiful name like Edith. My conviction was deep and immovable that had I been named something really pretty like that, I would have found it easy to sew neatly and know my lessons.
    • 2009 Linwood Barclay, Fear the Worst, Banrtam Books, ISBN 0553807161, page 76:
      - - but they went and gave it to this woman named Edith, if you can believe that any woman with a name like Edith would have a clue about what's fashionable." "Edith Head?" I said. "The Oscar-winning costume designer?"

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Edith in the 19th century.

Proper noun[edit]

Edith

  1. A female given name.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • [1] Danskernes Navne, based on CPR data: 32 166 females with the given name Edith have been registered in Denmark between about 1890 (=the population alive in 1967) and January 2005, with the frequency peak in the 1910s. Accessed on 19 May, 2011.

German[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Edith

  1. A female given name borrowed from English in the 19th century.

Norwegian[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Edith

  1. A female given name, a popular spelling variant of Edit.

Swedish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Edith

  1. A female given name, a less common spelling of Edit.