Edmund

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English Eadmund, from ēad (prosperity) + mund (protection).

Proper noun[edit]

Edmund

  1. A male given name, borne by early English kings and saints.
    • 1593, William Shakespeare, King Henry VI, Part 2: Act II, Scene II:
      This Edmund, in the reign of Bolingbroke, / As I have read, laid claim unto the crown; / And but for Owen Glendower, had been king, / Who kept him in captivity till he died.
    • 1833 Jane Austen, Mansfield Park, Chapter 7:
      "To me, the sound of Mr. Bertram is so cold and nothing-meaning, so entirely without warmth or character! It just stands for a gentleman, and that's all. But there is nobleness in the name of Edmund. It is a name of heroism and renown; of kings, princes, and knights; and seems to breathe the spirit of chivalry and warm affections."

Translations[edit]


Danish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Edmund

  1. A male given name of English origin.

German[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Edmund

  1. A male given name of English origin.

Swedish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Edmund

  1. A male given name of English origin.