Herculæan

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Comparable with Augæan or Europæan.

Adjective[edit]

Herculæan (comparative more Herculæan, superlative most Herculæan)

  1. Alternative spelling of Herculean.
    • 1857, Dr. Gustav Friedrich Waagen, Galleries and Cabinets of Art in Great Britain, page 356 (John Murray):
      In the mouth and small eyes may be seen the unspeakable studies of a long life, to which the painter has drawn attention by the inscription upon the gilt edges of a book bound in red, and elegantly decorated, on which Erasmus is leaning, and which runs thus : — ΗΡΑΚΛΕΟΙ ΠΟΝΟΙ Erasmi Rodero. ie the Herculæan labours of Erasmus of Rotterdam.
    • 1865, Lady Elizabeth Rigby Eastlake, The History of Our Lord as Exemplified in Works of Art, volume 1, page 253 (2nd Ed.):
      The Sibylla Persica, supposed to be the oldest of the sisterhood, holds the book close to her eyes, as if from dimness of sight, which fact, contradicted as it is by a frame of obviously Herculæan strength, gives a mysterious intentness to the action.
    • 1879, Susan Warner, My Desire, page 429 (R. Carter and Brothers):
      Obedient to your well urged petition, I have gone into the Herculæan task of clearing — not the Augæan stables, but what is worse, — my baskets of papers.
    • 1910, Edward Granville Browne, The Persian Revolution of 1905–1909, page 239:
      The Finance Committee, which began its Herculæan labours on the Nawrús or New Year’s Day (March 21) of 1907, and presented its Budget to the Majlis in the following October, comprised 12 members, 5 from Ázarbáyján, 2 from Ṭihrán, 2 from Fárs, and one each from Kirmán, Khurásán and Hamadán.