Jan

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See also: jan, jan., Jan., and Ján

English[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Jan

  1. Abbreviation of January.

Translations[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French Jehan (John)

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Jan

  1. (dated) A male given name

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortened from Janet and Janice.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Jan

  1. A female nickname, sometimes used as a formal given name.
    • 1899 Paul Leicester Ford: Janice Meredith: Chapter 1:
      "Yes, Mommy," answered Janice. Then she turned to her friend and asked, "Shall I wear my light chintz and kenton kerchief, or my purple and white striped Persian?" "Sufficiently smart for a country lass, Jan," cried her friend.
    • 2008, Stephen King, Just After Sunset, Simon and Schuster (2009), ISBN 1416586652, page 129:
      She's startled. How long has it been since he called her Jax instead of Janet or Jan? The last is a nickname she secretly hates. It makes her think of that syrupy-sweet actress on Lassie when she was a kid, the little boy (Timmy, his name was Timmy) always fell down a well or got bitten by a snake or trapped under a rock, and what kind of parents put a kid's life in the hands of a fucking collie?

Etymology 3[edit]

From Polish, Czech, German, Dutch, modern Scandinavian etc. Jan, from Latin Johannes (John).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Jan

  1. A male given name, in English mostly applied to foreign language speakers.

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Jan m

  1. A male given name, cognate to John.

Related terms[edit]


Danish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Jan

  1. A male given name, one of the cognates of English John. Popular in the 20th century.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • [1] Danskernes Navne, based on CPR data: 46 783 males with the given name Jan have been registered in Denmark between about 1890 (=the population alive in 1967) and January 2005, with the frequency peak in the 1970s. Accessed on 19 June 2011.

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Jan ?

  1. A male given name, cognate to John or Jan.

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Jan

  1. A male given name, a Low German and North European variant of Johann (= John), popular in Germany at the end of the 20th century.

Limburgish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Jan m

  1. A male given name, equivalent to English John.

Inflection[edit]

Inflection
Root singular Root plural Diminutive singular Diminutive plural
nominative Jan Jen Jenke Jenkes
genitive Jans Jen Jenkes Jenkes
locative Jannese Janneser Jenneske Jenneskes
vocative Janne  ?  ?  ?
dative¹ Jannem Jannemer Jennemske Jennemskes
accusative¹ Jan Jen Jenke Jenkes
  • Dative and accusative are nowadays obsolete, use nominative instead.

See also[edit]


Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch and West Frisian Jan in the 18th century. A contraction of Johannes (John). Newer variant of the more traditional Norwegian Jon.

Proper noun[edit]

Jan

  1. A male given name.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The most common given name of men born in Norway from the 1940s to the 1970s.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Kristoffer Kruken - Ola Stemshaug: Norsk personnamnleksikon, Det Norske Samlaget, Oslo 1995, ISBN 82-521-4483-7
  • [2] Statistisk sentralbyrå, Namnestatistikk: 50 519 males with the given name Jan living in Norway on January 1st 2011, with the frequency peak in the 1950s. Accessed on April 29th, 2011.

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Jan m (diminutive Janek or Jaś or Jasio)

  1. A male given name (equivalent to John)

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Contraction of Johan (John). Recorded in Sweden since the 17th century.

Proper noun[edit]

Jan

  1. A male given name.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Common first part of hyphenated names such as Jan-Erik or Jan-Olof.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Roland Otterbjörk: Svenska förnamn, Almqvist & Wiksell 1996, ISBN 91-21-10937-0
  • [3] Statistiska centralbyrån and Sture Allén, Staffan Wåhlin, Förnamnsboken, Norstedts 1995, ISBN 9119551622: 129 738 males with the given name Jan living in Sweden on December 31st, 2010, with the frequency peak in the 1960s. Accessed on 19 June 2011.