Sif

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse, from sif (kindred, kinswoman); see also English and Middle English sib (having kinship; kinsmen), Old English sibb (kinship), German Sippe (tribe).

Proper noun[edit]

Sif

  1. (Norse mythology) A goddess, the wife of Thor.
    • 1889, Viktor Rydberg, Teutonic Mythology, page 60,
      As already stated, Thor was, according to the Edda, married to Sibil, that is to say, the Sibylla, and the Edda adds that this Sibil is called Sif in the North. In the Teutonic mythology Thor's wife is the goddess Sif.
    • 2005, Nathan J. Johnson, Robert J. Wallis, Galdrbok: Practical Heathen Runecraft, Shamanism and Magic, page 309,
      For some contemporary Heathens, Lammas is sacred to Sif and Thunor (see Our Troth online Chapter LIII). In Snorri's Skaldskaparmal (see Faulkes 1998 [1987]: 96), Loki cropped Sif’s (presumably blonde or flaxen) hair, seemingly out of spite, a cropping which compares to the harvesting of corn. [] Sif’s golden hair is a contemporary kenning for the cornfield as it is caressed by the breeze and makes gentle waves.

See also[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse Sif.

Proper noun[edit]

Sif

  1. (Norse mythology) Sif.
  2. A female given name.

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse Sif.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Sif f

  1. (Norse mythology) Sif (wife of Thor)
  2. A female given name

Declension[edit]