Silas

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Silas, from Ancient Greek Σίλας (Sílas), from Aramaic שאילא (Şe'ela), cognate of Hebrew שָׁאוּל (Saul).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Silas

  1. (biblical) The companion of Paul in the New Testament, also called Silvanus.
  2. A male given name of Biblical origin.

Quotations[edit]

  • 1611, King James Version of the Bible (Authorized Version)[1]: Acts 15: 22:
    Then pleased it the apostles and elders, with the whole church, to send chosen men of their own company to Antioch with Paul and Barnabas; namely, Judas surnamed Barsabas, and Silas, chief men among the brethren;

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

  • Sy , Si (diminutive)

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Silas

  1. (biblical) Silas.
  2. A male given name, currently popular in Denmark.

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek Σίλας (Sílas), from Aramaic שאילא (Şe'ela).

Pronunciation[edit]

(Classical) IPA(key): /ˈsiː.laːs/, [ˈsiː.ɫaːs]

Proper noun[edit]

Sīlās m (genitive Sīlae); first declension

  1. male given name Silas

Inflection[edit]

First declension, Greek type masculine in -ās.

Number Singular
nominative Sīlās
genitive Sīlae
dative Sīlae
accusative Sīlān
ablative Sīlā
vocative Sīla

Descendants[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Silas

Alternative forms[edit]

  • Silás

Proper noun[edit]

Silas m

  1. (biblical) Silas
    • 1602La Santa Biblia (antigua versión de Casiodoro de Reina), rev., Los Hechos 15:40
      Y Pablo escogiendo á Silas, partió encomendado de los hermanos á la gracia del Señor.

Ladino[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Spanish Silas.

Proper noun[edit]

Silas m (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling סילאס)

  1. Silas