Talk:concept

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Hebrew translation[edit]

In the Hebrew translations, I erased the words "רעיון" (Idea) and "הבנה" (understanding). Liso 13:56, 28 May 2007 (UTC)

Definitions[edit]

Candidate definitions; building material for definitions
No. Definition Note
1. Something understood, and retained in the mind, from experience, reasoning and/or imagination; a generalization (generic, basic form), or abstraction (mental impression), of a particular set of instances or occurrences (specific, though different, recorded manifestations of the concept). Current in Wiktionary.
2. An abstract idea or a mental symbol, typically associated with a corresponding representation in a language or symbology. First one currently in Wikipedia.
3. A unit of knowledge built from characteristics. Second one currently in Wikipedia.
4. An abstract general conception; a notion; a universal. concept in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
5. A general notion; the predicate of a (possible) judgment; a complex of characters; the immediate object of thought in simple apprehension. Conception is applied to both the act and the object in conceiving; concept is restricted to object. concept in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

--Daniel Polansky 09:42, 30 June 2008 (UTC)

Identity of "Sir W. Hamilton"[edit]

I estimate that the person quoted by Webster 1913 under the name "Sir W. Hamilton" is W:Sir William Hamilton, 9th Baronet, a Scottish metaphysician who has also written on logic. Another candidate is W:William Rowan Hamilton, an Irish mathematician, physicist, and astronomer. W. R. Hamilton is not a philosopher in the narrow sense, and would presumably be quoted as "Sir W. R. Hamilton. Still, the identification that I have performed remains an estimation, to be falsified if need be. See also W:William Hamilton, a list of all people with the name. --Daniel Polansky 10:09, 30 June 2008 (UTC)

Concept mean 'something understood'[edit]

This can't be right can it? We don't use concept to mean "something understood," we use it for any old idea. Paul 89.242.106.40 11:21, 13 November 2008 (UTC)