Talk:curry

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From RFV[edit]

curry[edit]

Adjective sense: curried only, right? --Connel MacKenzie 16:23, 5 March 2007 (UTC)

Maybe not. Caribbean cuisine features "curry goat", not "curried goat", so this might be regional. Note that in this usage, "curry" is not an adjective but a noun used as a modifier. — Paul G 16:44, 5 March 2007 (UTC)
Similarly, I've seen recipe books from the south-eastern United States give recipes for curry chicken (as opposed to curried chicken). -- Beobach972 19:03, 5 March 2007 (UTC)
Um, curry goat. I'm hungry. I learned it in Jamaica and from the Carribean people where I lived. And we have it here too (although goat is often called "mutton"). Is an adjective in its common use in this sense, should be listed as such. Robert Ullmann 11:30, 7 March 2007 (UTC)
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curry

Rfv-sense: A yellowish color. And, if real, is it just a noun used attributively? (Listed separately from other sense due to different duration of waiting period.) DCDuring TALK 00:31, 5 November 2008 (UTC)

Deleted. Equinox 23:08, 12 May 2009 (UTC)


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The following discussion has been moved from Wiktionary:Requests for verification.

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moved from WT:RFD#curry

Adjective. Attributive use of noun, I think, though def. is not exact match. DCDuring TALK 00:27, 5 November 2008 (UTC)

  • The use of the word curry in the West Indies is different from that in the Indian subcontinent. It always comes before the noun (e.g. curry goat) and seems to be used as an adjective. The dish seems to use different spices (I am not an expert, only having eaten curry goat once (and survived)). SemperBlotto 08:44, 5 November 2008 (UTC)
That raises the question of a split in the etymology. DCDuring TALK 10:33, 5 November 2008 (UTC)

Moved on 11:21, 13 September 2009 (UTC), please look for sources that show this to be an adjective, and not simply a noun. Mglovesfun (talk) 11:21, 13 September 2009 (UTC)

I thought this would be okay, but using the formula "[meat] is curry" using the most common meats I could think of on Google Books gets zero hits. So I guess anyone who wants tro try has 14 days to do so; at least nobody can says that 'nobody even tried to verify it'. Mglovesfun (talk) 22:10, 30 September 2009 (UTC)
On Google Scholar, also zero. Mglovesfun (talk) 22:12, 30 September 2009 (UTC)
Failed, removed. Mglovesfun (talk) 14:37, 23 October 2009 (UTC)


Etymology: Middle English[edit]

A note on etymology – it seems clearly Anglo-Indian to me.

While Indian (specifically Tamil) origins of the dish and name are clear (there are other indisputable examples, like mulligatawny), it beggars belief that the existing Middle English word cury (meaning “cooking”) did not also influence the name. Notably, the 1390 Forme of Cury (Forms of Cooking) was the most famous cookbook of the British Middle Ages, while England only was exposed to India from the early 1600s, over two centuries later, and curry/currey only seems to appear in mid-1700s. Further, the dish itself is clearly an Anglo-Indian blend – Indian spices in a British gravy dish of medieval origins – as reflected in the fact that curry is distinctively British Indian, rather than European (and is clearly a British variant on the Indian dish).

A strong case for this etymology is made in The Origins of ‘Curry’ (Is it really English?); I’ve put a referenced etymology in this revision, which is hopefully balanced (and includes the title page as image).

See also piccalilli for a possible similar Anglo-Indian blend, also found (in some form) in Glasse, The Art of Cooking as paco lilla – current form seems a blend with existing pickle. I have accordingly put this is “See also”. Hope this proves useful!

—Nils von Barth (nbarth) (talk) 23:12, 8 October 2010 (UTC)