Talk:give stick

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
Green check.svg

The following discussion has been moved from Wiktionary:Requests for verification.

Please do not re-nominate for verification without comprehensive reasons for doing so.


give stick

I think I have heard this, but only in reference to a hockey player's actions on the ice. Does it really exist outside of the hockey rink, with either of these meanings? --Connel MacKenzie 04:14, 14 May 2007 (UTC)

The first mention ("to abuse") is very common in UK English. The object goes between the verb and the noun (as in "give someone stick"). Now I think of it, I think it might need to be "give (someone) some stick" rather than just "give (someone) stick". — Paul G 15:41, 14 May 2007 (UTC)
There are plenty of citations available for the form without "some". One may also get (some) stick and take (some) stick. Kappa 23:55, 14 May 2007 (UTC)

So, does anyone care to cite this? :-) —RuakhTALK 01:54, 25 July 2007 (UTC)

I shall… † Raifʻhār Doremítzwr 12:20, 25 July 2007 (UTC)
I’ve added five citations for the first sense, but I haven’t found any for the second. I’ve never heard the second one before, so I’m unsure if it exists. I’ll change the RFV banner to an RFV-sense one, assuming that the first sense has RFVpassed. † Raifʻhār Doremítzwr 13:07, 25 July 2007 (UTC)
Thanks. Seeing as the U.K.-ers seem to think that the first sense is in clearly widespread use, and there's nothing obviously wrong with your cites, I'll count it RFV passed without the normal waiting period. Seeing as no one seems to be familiar with the second sense, and it's still uncited after more than two months, I'm marking it RFV failed and removing it. —RuakhTALK 14:58, 25 July 2007 (UTC)


Keep tidy.svg

The following discussion has been moved from Wiktionary:Requests for verification.

Failure to be verified may either mean that this information is fabricated, or is merely beyond our resources to confirm. We have archived here the disputed information, the verification discussion, and any documentation gathered so far, pending further evidence.
Do not re-add this information to the article without also submitting proof that it meets Wiktionary's criteria for inclusion. See also Wiktionary:Previously deleted entries.


give stick

I think I have heard this, but only in reference to a hockey player's actions on the ice. Does it really exist outside of the hockey rink, with either of these meanings? --Connel MacKenzie 04:14, 14 May 2007 (UTC)

The first mention ("to abuse") is very common in UK English. The object goes between the verb and the noun (as in "give someone stick"). Now I think of it, I think it might need to be "give (someone) some stick" rather than just "give (someone) stick". — Paul G 15:41, 14 May 2007 (UTC)
There are plenty of citations available for the form without "some". One may also get (some) stick and take (some) stick. Kappa 23:55, 14 May 2007 (UTC)

So, does anyone care to cite this? :-) —RuakhTALK 01:54, 25 July 2007 (UTC)

I shall… † Raifʻhār Doremítzwr 12:20, 25 July 2007 (UTC)
I’ve added five citations for the first sense, but I haven’t found any for the second. I’ve never heard the second one before, so I’m unsure if it exists. I’ll change the RFV banner to an RFV-sense one, assuming that the first sense has RFVpassed. † Raifʻhār Doremítzwr 13:07, 25 July 2007 (UTC)
Thanks. Seeing as the U.K.-ers seem to think that the first sense is in clearly widespread use, and there's nothing obviously wrong with your cites, I'll count it RFV passed without the normal waiting period. Seeing as no one seems to be familiar with the second sense, and it's still uncited after more than two months, I'm marking it RFV failed and removing it. —RuakhTALK 14:58, 25 July 2007 (UTC)