Talk:humor

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Translation - Italian[edit]

Something funny is translated as umore in Italian. However, as a native speaker I find this translation imprecise. The term umore is used in Italian with two main meanings: mood (e.g. He is in good spirits - E' di buon umore) or in the archaic sense of one of the four bodily fluids. When referring to something funny, in Italian the word humor is the standard use (the alternate spelling is rarely used) along with its synonym umorismo (e.g. He has a good sense of humor - Ha il senso dello humor / Ha il senso dell'umorismo). The word umore should not be used in this sense. Note the corresponding adjective is umoristico (corresponding to English humourous).

  • Hi there. I have adjusted the translations and added a couple of Italian definitions. Feel free to correct them, and add any others. SemperBlotto 11:34, 30 October 2006 (UTC)
    • p.s. My Zingarelli has "humour" rather than "humor" as the Italian spelling.
      • Thanks a lot! As for the variant spelling, I'm guessing Zingarelli favours the British spelling because it is usually perceived as "more European" in nature. But the American spelling is more widespread in everyday use among Italian speakers including journalists, especially nowadays (I used to see the variant spelling humour more frequently in the past). Anyhow, both variants are technically correct, so I guess both should be mentioned. Thanks! Hroswith 14:03, 30 October 2006 (UTC)

humour[edit]

I just noticed that there are two separate entries for humor/humour, when (it looks like) it should be only one full entry and one pointing to the other entry. What are people's thoughts on this? See alternative spelling Speednat (talk) 05:22, 19 May 2012 (UTC)

Latin noun[edit]

The correct form in Classical Latin is "umor", the variant "humor" being found since the second century CE in places where the letter "h" became already silent. It is in fact a spread misspeling which most likely belongs only to Vulgar Latin, so I propose this fact to be indicated in this article, rather than considering "humor" as a real variant. --Farru ES (talk) 20:01, 30 April 2013 (UTC)

I think you make a good argument for it being a real variant. Mglovesfun (talk) 20:58, 30 April 2013 (UTC)