Talk:north

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etymology[edit]

sorry the etymology of north is so bizzare. i swear to god im not making this stuff up! (ampersand)

RFD[edit]

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north
This sense:
  1. (meteorology) Of wind, from the north.
seems wrong to me. We frequently describe winds by their source direction, but it doesn't "feel" to me like that's a property of all the various possible source directions ("north", "north-northeast", "land", "sea", "desert", etc.). —RuakhTALK 16:31, 7 December 2010 (UTC)
  • I think it's OK, except for the meteorology tag. Historically though you're right. In OE, the word was just an adverb. It appeared either alone as an inflected adverb, or as a stem-form in compounds. So north wind as a set term is attested much earlier than other more obviously adjectival uses (although there are plenty of them). Another way of looking at it, though: this could be kind of interpreted now as almost an attributive noun – "wind of the north", just like "wind of the desert" and your other examples. Ƿidsiþ 16:51, 7 December 2010 (UTC)
  • Delete per nom. A good place to put a usage note on this would be nice, but I don't know where. Maybe at all the nouns that collocate with the direction words: wind, breeze, etc.​—msh210 (talk) 22:35, 18 July 2011 (UTC)

{{look}}

Actually, I'd like to know how the adverb "from the north" works, and I'm about to RFV it. Could someone sat "the wind blew north" meaning "blew from the north"? That would be confusing! I think the fact that "north (adjective) wind" means "wind from the north" rather than "wind blowing northward" is just as confusing: "north" has two rather opposite senses, and they aren't the product of sarcasm ("oh, that's just great..."). Thus, I say we keep the meteorological sense for clarity. Other dictionaries also have both adjective senses ("to the north", "from the north"). If Widsith also thinks the sense is OK, that makes this RFD a draw, and since it's been more than a year, I'm going to close it. - -sche (discuss) 17:43, 3 February 2012 (UTC)


RFV discussion: February–March 2012[edit]

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north

Rfv-sense, of the adverb "Of wind, from the north." I just closed a year-old Request for Deletion of the adjective "from the north"; the adjective sense is easy to find in books and other dictionaries. I'm having a hard time thinking of an example of this adverb sense, though, and I checked a few other dictionaries, and they also lack it. Even in phrases like "blew north from", it seems to mean "blew towards the north, from (a southerly point)", as in: "1986 had seemed a year of immense possibility. Now a disaster loomed, of consequences yet unknown, and radiation blew north from Chernobyl." (2008, Richard Rhodes, Arsenals of Folly: The Making of the Nuclear Arms Race, page 4.) - -sche (discuss) 18:08, 3 February 2012 (UTC)

  • Seems like a mistake to me. Doesn't appear in the OED either. Ƿidsiþ 10:43, 4 February 2012 (UTC)
RFV-failed. - -sche (discuss) 04:10, 3 March 2012 (UTC)


"Above or higher " is an adjective[edit]

"Above or higher " is an adjective not a noun. Siuenti (talk) 14:43, 18 January 2014 (UTC)