Talk:poontang

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The word "POONTANG" is meant to refer to post puberty girls and women, especially the vagina, clitoral part of their anatomy. Meant to be an endearing term used primarily by and amongst heterosexual males. Poontang can be used when referring to the person herself: "That is some fine poontang" or when describing the female population at a party or club: "The poontang here abounds". Or as a celebratory statement of fact:"WANG DANG SWEET POONTANG" made popular by Ted Nugent. —This unsigned comment was added by Jkabel (talkcontribs) at 20:27, 7 December 2006 (UTC).

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poontang

Second sense. Is the second sense a UKism or something? Also: highly dubious folk etymology from same contributor. --Connel MacKenzie 05:08, 15 March 2007 (UTC)

Didn't seem at all out of the ordinary to me - men euphemistically rephrase lots of slang terms for certain female parts as the utilization of those parts (i.e. to get some [insert term here]). My sense is that the word was brought back by soldiers from Vietnam, but maybe that's just from watching too many 'Nam era war movies. bd2412 T 05:13, 15 March 2007 (UTC)
OED agrees more or less with both the second definition and the etymology. My experience is that the genital sense and the getting some sense are nearly indistinguishable in common speech. Atelaes 05:19, 15 March 2007 (UTC)
The OED actually lists the second sense as the primary meaning.
1927 J. O'HARA Sel. Lett. (1978) 25 Just between us I haven't had any poon-tang since I was in Germany.
--Ptcamn 07:02, 15 March 2007 (UTC)
Just to be pedantic, um, no. #1) Thank God we are not the OED, #2) that is the 1st meaning use figuratively, not the second nonsense definition. That is, J. O'HARA's selected letter is talking about getting some pussy not something obtuse like building a relationship, nor gay sex, nor getting a blow job... --Connel MacKenzie 14:59, 16 March 2007 (UTC)
The second sense isn't about a relationship, but about sexual relations, which in the U.S. is a formal/euphemistic way of saying "sex". As it turns out, different people feel differently about what constitutes sex; after the Clinton scandals, some polling organization found that older people tended to consider oral sex a kind of sex, while younger people did not. —RuakhTALK 15:47, 16 March 2007 (UTC)
See also Ted Nugent:
Wang Dang Sweet Poontang
Wang dang, what a sweet poontang
a shakin' my thang as a rang-a-dang-dang in the bell
Appears to me that ol' Ted is using the term to refer to the woman herself. bd2412 T 15:56, 16 March 2007 (UTC)
We're well out of my area of having-a-clue here, but a Web search gives the second line of that song as "She lookin' so clean, especi'lly down in between; what I like", which makes it sound like he is indeed referring to her nether region. BTW, if it's particularly common for poontang to be used metaphorically in reference to sex, then I think that bears some kind of note, even if it's not a fully separate sense. —RuakhTALK 16:55, 16 March 2007 (UTC)

This entry has the word disputed' in bold in the etymology section. Is there a template (and category) for disputed etymologies that should be used instead? RJFJR 15:09, 16 March 2007 (UTC)

If you could fix that error for me, I'd appreciate it. However, my dipute question is perhaps the wrong label for the entry, anyway. --Connel MacKenzie 17:33, 17 March 2007 (UTC)
For what it's worth, I've heard this word used in the sense in question in everyday conversations. I'd point out there is a similar phenomenon with pussy: people say "I'm going to get some pussy" to mean "I'm going to have sex with a woman", and this is probably related to the sense in question of poontang. *Signed Language Lover*

RFV passed. (Not cited, but it seems like everyone agrees that this use exists and is clearly widespread. I've rewritten the sense a bit in a way that hopefully Connel will be O.K. with.) —RuakhTALK 18:45, 9 June 2007 (UTC)

"Poontang" isn't an "endearing" term. Most dictionaries correctly list it as a term of derogation.

Citation and sourcing[edit]

  • Could someone point me towards a page telling me how best to cite or source the etymology here (and elsewhere) please? --Kylemew 21:44, 5 August 2007 (UTC)

The whole world does not begin and end in the USA. I heard this term in use by WWII veterans who had fought in the far East and this preceeded the Vietnam War. It is entirely possible that this term due to its roots in the French language came back to the UK and the USA after the Great War of 1914-18. USA was late to the party in both world wars???? Lots of bastardised French came back from the trenches after WWI.—This unsigned comment was added by 86.171.112.114 (talk) at 10:16,26 October 2012.