Talk:pussy

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(informal; also pussy-cat) An affectionate term for a cat.

isnt pussy or pussycat specifically a female cat? lygophile

No, all housecats are pussycats. —Stephen 14:18, 23 January 2007 (UTC)
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pussy[edit]

Bizarre nautical def. --Connel MacKenzie 16:26, 14 October 2007 (UTC)

It seems reasonable to me. Also, I found it used in this sense at http://www.corpun.com/kiss1.htm. —Stephen 12:31, 15 October 2007 (UTC)

Wouldn't this sense be the source of the term pussywhipped? -- Thisis0 18:18, 15 October 2007 (UTC)

Um, no, I don't think so. The "vagina" meaning of "pussy" is the component of the compound term. The obsolete meaning was still obsolete in the early 1990s (or very late 1980s) when "pussy whipped" came into use. The nautical definition (if it existed) was obsolete almost a century before that. The "corpun" link above [warning: pop-unders, other disreputable crap from that site - use google cache if you can find it], ({{nosecondary}}) mentions "pussy" with almost identical wording as the original disputed entry here, but its "sample logs" show no such use (and are of questionable transcription anyway.) This sounds like a fanciful back-formation. --Connel MacKenzie 20:45, 15 October 2007 (UTC)
I should reword: Is it plausible that this sense influenced the term pussywhipped? (Which is attested from 1956,[1] not "very late 1980s". What's your source for that tidbit?) Slang terms frequently enter from nautical and wartime use. Granted, it's only my imagination, but I see an excellent double-entendre when Navy boys would have started tossing around the term "pussywhipped", knowing the older nautical reference. Again, only my imagination, but I thought it was interesting enough to look into. I agree that this nautical sense lacks references anywhere on the net save Wikipedia -- at both w:Cat_o'_nine_tails#Boys'_punishment and w:Glossary_of_nautical_terms#R (term: Reduced Cat). They are unsourced, but it would be enlightening to find whatever source was used there. -- Thisis0 21:34, 15 October 2007 (UTC)


I am the editor of corpun.com. I have removed from the above a claim that my site has pop-unders, which it does not, and never has had; and a claim that the transcriptions of official records on my site are questionable. The extracts in question were carefully transcribed by myself at the Public Records Office. You can go there and check them yourself -- that is why I always cite the file numbers. C.Farrell.

I've moved your comment out of the archive. Conrad.Irwin 18:18, 13 June 2008 (UTC)

Is it possible that the "coward" meaning of pussy comes from pusillanimous? 21:44, 8 July 2009

Etymology[edit]

The number of languages using "p/h-" words for the vulgar sense seems disproportionately high. There is a PIE root for it: *pisd-eh₂- ("vulva") which produced R. пизда (and other Slavic reflexes), Alb. pidhi and possibly Lith. putė (?). Finnish has pillu, Hungarian punci, pina. Chinese has (bī < *pit) which is common Sino-Tibetan: Yi pi⁵⁵, Qiang (Yadu) pʰoʂ, Loloish *batᴸ. Georgian ფისო (p’iso) < Proto-North-Caucasian *pūṭi ~ būṭi (?). Tagalog puday, puke < Proto-Austronesian *palaq, bediq, betiq₂. Korean 보지 (poci). Hbrug 11:26, 2 November 2011 (UTC)