Talk:slut

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Delete[edit]

I guess this needs deleteing or reverting??? —This unsigned comment was added by Trunkie (talkcontribs) at 11:21, 11 August 2004.

yes, it should be deleted. —This unsigned comment was added by 212.238.152.174 (talkcontribs) at 16:53, 11 August 2004.
No, this is a valid word - it just needs some contents. I have written a definition. — Paul G 17:12, 11 Aug 2004 (UTC)

bitch[edit]

Archaic meanings are fine, but was this really synonymous with bitch at some point in the distant past? Citations please. This is pretty hard to accept as valid otherwise. --Connel MacKenzie 02:32, 5 October 2005 (UTC)

I was supprised to learn it as well. http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=slut&searchmode=none provides a note on the matter; I can't remember where I first read it. The word was used when bitch was found to be more offensive. Citizen Premier 02:39, 5 October 2005 (UTC)

Yes, it is a real [archaic] sense of the word; even if it does not make much sense to us now. I provided a quote from Susanna Moodie's Roughing it in the Bush (1852); I can provide more if necessary. Beobach972 15:08, 7 August 2006 (UTC)

Is "slutr" really Norwegian?[edit]

In the etymology for the English word, is "slutr" really modern Norwegian? To me it looks lika a typically Old Norse word with the "r" at the end. 83.249.211.78 14:36, 12 June 2008 (UTC)

It’s Norwegian dialect, from Proto-Germanic *slautjan-. Related to Danish da:w:slud. —Stephen 08:44, 13 June 2008 (UTC)
You missed the IP's point. Modern Norwegian words do not end in consonant + -r (unless the r is part of the stem, as in Nynorsk vinter and sommar or sumar, but note that there is an epenthetic vowel in all cases). Therefore, slutr looks like an Old Norse word. Especially since you affirm that the Danish cognate does not have an r, it seems that it is a case ending and not part of the stem. On the other hand, Pfeifer's Etymological Dictionary of German (under Schloße) does quote the dialectal Modern Norwegian word as slutr, too. Odd. Perhaps some modern Norwegian dialects simply do not have epenthetic vowels in such cases. --Florian Blaschke (talk) 19:31, 20 August 2013 (UTC)

Swedish verb[edit]

The imperative form "slut" is only correct for one of the two Swedish verbs "sluta". Is there a way to link to the correct form? Wakuran 11:59, 6 June 2011 (UTC)

senses[edit]

Out of the eight senses of the noun slut in English described it seems all of them except the very last are very similar. I suggest two things to do,the first being to condense the first seven into fewer, but broader explanations. The second is to mark the difference in relation of the desciptions to eachother somehow someway.

If the case permits it it might also be prudent to boil all the seven first points into one or to remove the eight entirely, depending on the case/facts (etc). —This unsigned comment was added by 77.247.146.29 (talkcontribs).

Very similar? No! None of the senses are very similar. Perhaps the most similar are "promiscuous woman" and "prostitute", but even those are clearly distinct. - -sche (discuss) 22:31, 7 September 2012 (UTC)
1st and 2nd could be merged. The others are quite different. — Ungoliant (Falai) 23:35, 7 September 2012 (UTC)

Middle English[edit]

The etymology section for English links to a non-existent Middle English section in which the term meant "mud". It is from that which the Late Middle English slutte is referenced as having derived from. Can we add that? Etym (talk) 03:37, 15 May 2013 (UTC)