Talk:spruce

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This used to be in Category:Polish derivations, but if I understand Webster right, then it would be a just a mispronunciation of Prussia. Hence it is not derived from a Polish word. henne 12:35, 29 November 2006 (UTC)

According to English historian Norman Davies (in his book God's playground: a history of Poland) word spruce is a derivation from Polish z Prus - from Prussia.

RFD[edit]

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spruce

Rfd-redundant: (Adjective) Made of the wood of spruce. I think this not the only way that "spruce" is used attributively. For example, "spruce forest", "spruce needle", "spruce cone", "spruce bark", "spruce pest". If we are to include attributive use we need to include a more inclusive sense such as "being of or related to spruce". Of course, both senses probably should be deleted, monolingualexically speaking. DCDuring TALK 19:12, 13 March 2010 (UTC)

Delete. I'm tagging and adding the adjective sense "Being from a spruce tree" to this rfd-sense, and saying "delete" for it, too.​—msh210 18:43, 16 June 2010 (UTC)
This should be at RFV to look for citations right? I generally thought stuff that's plausible as a true adjective goes there, and stuff that isn't gets deleted immediately. Mglovesfun (talk) 07:51, 21 June 2010 (UTC)

Moving to RFV. Mglovesfun (talk) 11:55, 15 February 2011 (UTC)

RFV[edit]

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spruce

Rfv-senses:

  1. Made of the wood of the spruce.
  2. Being from a spruce tree.

Originally at RFD, moved here as adjectival use is a matter of attestation. Usually. Mglovesfun (talk) 11:57, 15 February 2011 (UTC)

I don't know what counts as an adjective in English. In Swedish we make compounds for things like "spruce table" (of the wood) and "spruce cone" (from the tree). But anyway, these examples are easy enough to find on the web, just like "pine" table/cone and "oak" table/leaf. --LA2 19:04, 18 February 2011 (UTC)
Wiktionary:English adjectives gives a bit of guidance. Compounds like you mention aren't (necessarily) using the word as an adjective; you can't say *"this cone is spruce", for example, as you'd expect to be able to if "spruce cone" simply meant "cone that is spruce" (with "spruce" meaning "from a spruce tree"). —RuakhTALK 19:14, 18 February 2011 (UTC)
But can you say "this table is oak"? And is that guiding the fact that oak is listed as an adjective? --LA2 21:59, 19 February 2011 (UTC)
This is just like the discussion about some of the senses of brass#Adjective at #brass. OneLook dictionaries don't have adjective senses for these. I'll bet the OED doesn't either (but only at even money). DCDuring TALK 22:08, 19 February 2011 (UTC)
@LA2: Your questions make me think that you're taking "oak" and "pine" to be confirmed adjectives, and asking how "spruce" is different? (Am I right?) If so, I should clarify that I'm not sure that "oak" and "pine" are adjectives, either (at least in the relevant senses). —RuakhTALK 21:53, 20 February 2011 (UTC)
Yes, that's what I'm asking. I have no real clue what counts as an adjective in English. Why is expired listed as an adjective, but exposed just as a verb form? Why is oak listed as an adjective, if spruce doesn't qualify? --LA2 16:00, 22 February 2011 (UTC)
Two reasons IMO
  1. There are as yet 'unofficial' tests at WT:English adjectives that some words will meet and someone won't
  2. We're inconsistent on everything due to several reasons, like lack of contributors, personal opinion, etc.
Mglovesfun (talk) 16:22, 22 February 2011 (UTC)
Senses removed for now as RFV-failed. - -sche (discuss) 22:16, 31 August 2011 (UTC)