Transwiki:List of British regional nicknames

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The United Kingdom has many nicknames for residents of its countries, cities and regions. For example, residents of Liverpool are referred to as Liverpudlians or Scousers. Some of these names are a badge of pride, in other cases they can be considered offensive.

Please remove items from this list as you add them to the main dictionary, so we can eventually delete this page.

Aberdeen 
Haddie,[1]
Barnsley 
Tykes,[2] Colliers (a former mining community), also Dingles (normally used by people from Sheffield)
Blackpool 
Sandgronian, Donkey Lasher
Caithness 
Gallach[3]
Camborne (Cornwall) 
Merry-Jack, Mera-Jack
Cardiganshire 
Cardi[4]
Darwen 
Darrener
Dundee 
Coagie
Edinburgh 
Edinbronian, Edinburger, Edinbourgeois
England 
Angel, Red Coat, Inglish, [5] Nigel, Guffie (in Northeast Scotland), Sais (in Wales)
Fraserburgh 
Brocher[6]
Glasgow 
Keelie[7]
Hartlepool 
Poolie
Horsham 
Horshamite
Kirkcaldy 
Langtonian
Isle of Wight 
Caulkhead (named after the caulking of boats)
Janner 
Originally a person who spoke with a Devon accent,[8][9] now simply any West Countryman.[8] In naval slang, this is specifically a person from Plymouth.[9]
Kirriemuir 
Kirriemairian
Leigh 
Lobbygobbler, Leyther
Lincolnshire 
Yellow belly (after a species of frog common in the Lincolnshire and East Anglian Fens)[10]
Liverpool 
Mickey Mouse
Llanelli 
Turk
London 
Del Boy
Luton 
Hatter
Middlesbrough 
Smoggie[11]
Neath 
Abbey-Jack
Northamptonshire 
Cobbler
North Wales 
Gog[12]
Norwich (Norfolk)
Carrot Cruncher, Country Bumpkin, Norfolk Dumpling
Oldham 
Yonner (from Oldham pronunciation of 'yonder' as in 'up yonner')
Peterborough 
Peterborian
Peterhead 
Bluemogganer, Blue-Tooner
Scotland 
Scottie, Jocks[13] Mac
Scunthorpe 
Scunthonian
Sheffield 
Dee-Dar (refers to the original Sheffield pronunciation of "thee" and "tha". Often used by people from Barnsley), Steely, Sheffielder, Steel Boy
Shropshire 
Salopian
South Shields  
Sand dancer
Southampton 
Sotonian
Southport 
Sandgrounder
Stoke-on-Trent 
Potter, Clay Head
Stockport 
Stopfordian
Sutherland 
Cattach
Swansea 
Jack, Swansea Jack
Swindon 
Moonraker
Walsall 
Saddler
Warrington 
Wire, Wirepuller (after the local wire industry),
Welshpool 
Soupie
West Riding of Yorkshire 
Wessie (in other parts of Yorkshire)
Weymouth and Portland 
Kimberlin (Portland name for a person from Weymouth)
Wigan 
Pie-Eater, Purrer
Wiltshire 
Moonraker

References[edit]

  1. ^ "haddie", Template:harv
  2. ^ "tyke", Template:harv
  3. ^ ', {{{author}}}, Transactions of the Gaelic Society (link):
    {{{text}}}
  4. ^ "Cardi", Template:harv
  5. ^ "Sassenach", Template:harv
  6. ^ 2003, Adrian Room, Placenames of the world: origins and meanings of the names for over 5000 natural features, countries, capitals, territories, cities, and historic sites, ISBN 9780786418145, page 426:
    {{{text}}}
  7. ^ "Brewer, E. Cobham. Dictionary of Phrase & Fable. Nicknames", Bartleby.com. URL accessed on 2010-09-29.
  8. 8.0 8.1 "janner", Template:harv
  9. 9.0 9.1 1987, Cyril Tawney, Grey funnel lines: traditional song & verse of the Royal Navy, 1900–1970, ISBN 9780710212702, page 167:
    {{{text}}}
  10. ^ "Brewer, E. Cobham. Dictionary of Phrase & Fable. Nicknames", Bartleby.com. URL accessed on 2010-09-30.
  11. ^ Harley, Shaun. "'I was made in Middlesbrough'", BBC News, 2007-10-16. Retrieved on 2010-09-29.
  12. ^ "gog", Template:harv
  13. ^ "jock", Template:harv

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Bibliography for references[edit]