User:Nadando/etymology

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English forest, from Old French forest, from Medieval Latin foresta (open wood), first used in the Capitularies of Charlemagne in reference to the royal forest (as opposed to the inner woods, or parcus). Displaced native Middle English weald, wald (forest, weald) from Old English weald, Middle English scogh, scough (forest, shaw) from Old Norse skōgr, and Middle English frith, firth (forest, game preserve) from Old English fyrhþ.

Medieval Latin foresta probably represents the fusion of two earlier words: one taken as an adaptation of the Late Latin phrase forestem silvam (the outside woods), mistaking forestem for woods (—a development not found in Romance languages; compare Old French selve (forest)); the other is the continuance of an existing word since Merovingian times of Germanic origin, from Frankish *forhist (forest, wooded country, game preserve) as the general word for "forest, forested land". The Medieval Latin term may have originated as a sound-alike, or been adapted as a play on the Frankish word (Gallo-Romans were often outraged by the King's exclusive hunting rights in the "outside forest", and emphasis to "outside" may have been used to evoke danger). Frankish *forhist comes from Proto-Germanic *fúrχi-st-, *fúrχ-ust-, *fúrχi-þ(i)a-, *fúrχian (forest, wooded country, timber of firs) from *fúrχō (pine, fir), from Proto-Indo-European [[Appendix:Proto-Indo-European/perkwu-|*perkwu-]] (tree, oak, pine), and is cognate to Old High German forst (forest, wooded country, pine wood), Old English fyrhþ, fyrhþe (forest, game preserve, wooded country), Old Norse fȳri (pine forest), German Forst (forest). More at frith, fir.

Latin forestem (outside) comes from Latin foris (outside, out of doors) from Proto-Indo-European *dʰwer- (door, gate), akin to English door. More at foreign.

Etymology[edit]

  • First used in the Capitularies of Charlemagne in reference to the royal forest (as opposed to the inner woods, or parcus).
  • Displaced native Middle English weald, wald (forest, weald) from Old English weald, Middle English scogh, scough (forest, shaw) from Old Norse skōgr, and Middle English frith, firth (forest, game preserve) from Old English fyrhþ.
  • may have originated as a sound-alike, or been adapted as a play on the Frankish word (Gallo-Romans were often outraged by the King's exclusive hunting rights in the "outside forest", and emphasis to "outside" may have been used to evoke danger).
  • Probably from the fusion of two earlier words
  • from the Late Latin phrase forestem silvam (the outside woods)
  • Mistaking forestem for woods (—a development not found in Romance languages; compare Old French selve (forest))
  • from Latin foris (outside, out of doors)
  • from Proto-Indo-European *dʰwer- (door, gate)
  • Akin to English door. More at foreign.
  • from Frankish *forhist (forest, wooded country, game preserve)
  • As the general word for "forest, forested land"
  • The continuance of an existing word since Merovingian times of Germanic origin
  • Cognate to Old High German forst (“‘forest, wooded country, pine wood’”), Old English fyrhþ, fyrhþe (“‘forest, game preserve, wooded country’”), Old Norse fȳri (“‘pine forest’”), German Forst (“‘forest’”). More at frith, fir.
  • from Proto-Germanic *fúrχi-st-, *fúrχ-ust-, *fúrχi-þ(i)a-, *fúrχian (forest, wooded country, timber of firs)
  • from Proto-Indo-European [[Appendix:Proto-Indo-European/perkwu-|*perkwu-]] (tree, oak, pine)