User:Visviva/Guardian 20090107

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-01-07 issue of The Guardian which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created.

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  • Total recognized tokens: 39173
  • Total valid lowercase tokens: 30734
  • Total unique types: 5784
  • Initial new-word count (before removal of lemma duplicates, typos, etc.): 45 (~0.778%)

2009-01-07[edit]

  1. badland
  2. bluesiness
    • 2009 January 7, John Fordham, “Jim Mullen/NYJO”, The Guardian:
      Perhaps the musicianly guitar star Jim Mullen felt that opting for the odd burst of traditionally sweaty Hammond bluesiness would be just too easy, so his group's music tended instead to mingle graceful mid-tempo songs, such as Nature Boy or When I Fall in Love (with the ever-eloquent saxophonist Stan Sulzmann sounding quite Stan Getzian), with more quirkily personal choices such as an exquisitely yearning, folksy account of Robert Burns' Ae Fond Kiss.
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  3. cracklingly
    • 2009 January 7, John Fordham, “Jim Mullen/NYJO”, The Guardian:
      The hard-swinging National Youth Jazz Orchestra (now in its fourth decade under tireless boss Bill Ashton) opened impressively with Allan Ganley's cracklingly riffy Cannon Fodder, and paid touching tribute to the recently departed British composer Steve Gray on two graceful arrangements, while guest trumpeter Mark Armstrong stoked up a heated Louis Armstrong tribute.
      add
  4. demobilisation
    • 2009 January 7, Deirdre Krymer, “Obituary: Witold Krymer”, The Guardian:
      He had "a good war" and loved the British officer culture, but after demobilisation things got much tougher for him.
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  5. directionless
    • 2009 January 7, Brian Logan, “Bill Bailey”, The Guardian:
      In the largest venue in Europe, his particular brand of directionless noodling got lost.
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  6. disarmers
    • 2009 January 7, Duncan Campbell, “Fictional adventure in the Baltic launched 100 years of spycatching”, The Guardian:
      The cold war was also MI5's most controversial period, with peace activists, trade unionists, civil libertarians, nuclear disarmers, radical journalists, Irish republicans and assorted reds of different shades falling under suspicion and often being investigated in ludicrous circumstances. Those on whom files were opened included the future government ministers Jack Straw, Peter Mandelson, Harriet Harman and Patricia Hewitt.
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  7. fightback
  8. funkily
    • 2009 January 7, John Fordham, “Jim Mullen/NYJO”, The Guardian:
      Mike Gorman and Matt Skelton on organ and drums played well, but within themselves, and though Mullen's own mix of funkily hard-struck notes and soft-toned fluency is always hypnotic, a raw wail or two might have usefully rattled the glassware.
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  9. jobcentre
  10. khanaqahs
    • 2009 January 7, Leonard Lewisohn, “Javad Nurbakhsh”, The Guardian:
      Nurbakhsh had phenomenal success in building khanaqahs in the Shah's Iran, constructing 60 of them in all the main cities and towns before the Islamic fundamentalist revolution of 1978 that saw the return of Ayatollah Khomeini.
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  11. morbier
    • 2009 January 7, Hugh Muir, The Guardian[1]:
      Yesterday we told how a reblochon, the milk-rich cheese from the Alps region, was confiscated by security at Geneva as a dangerous liquid while a semi-soft but evidently less hazardous morbier was allowed through.
      add
    • 2009 January 7, “UK news in brief”, The Guardian:
      "There's a continuing need for human brain material," said Paul Francis, a neurochemist at King's College London.
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  12. neuroscientific
    • 2009 January 7, Maggie Snowling and Ann Cooke, “Tim Miles”, The Guardian:
      Tim's theory, expounded in his On Helping the Dyslexic Child (1970); Understanding Dyslexia (1987); Dyslexia: the Pattern of Difficulties (1983); and Fifty Years in Dyslexia Research, has stood the test of time and many of its key predictions have been upheld by contemporary neuroscientific evidence. In parallel with theoretical developments in the field of dyslexia, Tim also witnessed changes in the views of the educational establishment with respect to children with specific reading difficulties.
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  13. onstream
  14. opencast
    • 2009 January 7, Ian Traynor, “Europe's plan for alternative pipeline faces big problems”, The Guardian:
      Britain's leading green commentator, George Monbiot, gives the head of the Campaign to Protect Rural England an unforgettable grilling, asking why the countryside watchdog opposes windfarms - but not opencast coal mines
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  15. overegg
    • 2009 January 7, Judith Mackrell, “Manon”, The Guardian:
      His doughy, impassive face and gouty walk present a creepy contrast to the exquisite girl he corrupts, but Dowson knows not to overegg the pudding, relying expertly on the calm but chilling authority of his own nastiness.
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  16. postcommunist
    • 2009 January 7, Mark Almond, “A capitalist revolution”, The Guardian:
      In the old cold war, Soviet gas still flowed west at the height of rows between Reagan and Brezhnev - but postcommunist Russia is proving less pliant than the "evil empire".
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  17. psychodynamic
    • 2009 January 7, Maggie Snowling and Ann Cooke, “Tim Miles”, The Guardian:
      His early observation of a consistent pattern of subtle language difficulties, extraordinary spelling errors and problems of musical notation in children with dyslexia led him to reject psychodynamic theories that suggested the cause of these difficulties was emotional, instead hypothesising that the problem was constitutional in origin, likely to be "a form of aphasia". In his autobiographical account, Fifty Years in Dyslexia Research (2006), Tim acknowledged two children referred to him for help by the local child guidance clinic as providing the crucial clue to the nature of the disorder.
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  18. quirkily
    • 2009 January 7, John Fordham, “Jim Mullen/NYJO”, The Guardian:
      Perhaps the musicianly guitar star Jim Mullen felt that opting for the odd burst of traditionally sweaty Hammond bluesiness would be just too easy, so his group's music tended instead to mingle graceful mid-tempo songs, such as Nature Boy or When I Fall in Love (with the ever-eloquent saxophonist Stan Sulzmann sounding quite Stan Getzian), with more quirkily personal choices such as an exquisitely yearning, folksy account of Robert Burns' Ae Fond Kiss.
      add
  19. reblochon
    • 2009 January 7, Hugh Muir, The Guardian[2]:
      Yesterday we told how a reblochon, the milk-rich cheese from the Alps region, was confiscated by security at Geneva as a dangerous liquid while a semi-soft but evidently less hazardous morbier was allowed through.
      add
  20. revolutionalised
    • 2009 January 7, “The Guardian: G2”, The Guardian:
      Lucy Mangan bids farewell to a show that revolutionalised TV drama
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  21. reworkings
    • 2009 January 7, John Fordham, “Jim Mullen/NYJO”, The Guardian:
      The fourth of five exclusive jazz reworkings of the haunting Radiohead track
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  22. riffy
    • 2009 January 7, John Fordham, “Jim Mullen/NYJO”, The Guardian:
      The hard-swinging National Youth Jazz Orchestra (now in its fourth decade under tireless boss Bill Ashton) opened impressively with Allan Ganley's cracklingly riffy Cannon Fodder, and paid touching tribute to the recently departed British composer Steve Gray on two graceful arrangements, while guest trumpeter Mark Armstrong stoked up a heated Louis Armstrong tribute.
      add
  23. sectored
    • 2009 January 7, Charlie English, “The secret life of the snowflake revealed”, The Guardian:
      The stellar dendrites you see here are the largest forms of snow crystal and perhaps the most beautiful, with the sectored plates coming in a close second, but there are also less photogenic simple prisms, columns, bullet shapes and needles and crystals that combine different types.
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  24. stirrings
    • 2009 January 7, John Fordham, “Jim Mullen/NYJO”, The Guardian:
      In the sleepy January stirrings of the jazz scene, the punch of an immaculately drilled big band and the elegant grooving of a Hammond-organ group ought to have quickened the pulse rate - but even that combination found a quiet Monday-night Ronnie Scott's hard to ignite.
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  25. triumphalists
    • 2009 January 7, Mark Almond, “A capitalist revolution”, The Guardian:
      Medvedev announced a new pipeline to China on entering the Kremlin. Western triumphalists marked Russia down for inevitable decline.
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  26. unbreachable
    • 2009 January 7, Zoe Williams, “It's every cough mixture for itself in these times of ill”, The Guardian:
      Cough medicine companies have to pretend that, illness be damned, we all love work and have a sworn, unbreachable fealty to our employer. I was struck, on this account, by another advert, for the NatWest free financial advice scheme, in which a friendly NatWest lady tells a customer to ditch his gym membership and go for a run in the park.
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  27. underprepared
  28. windfarms
    • 2009 January 7, Ian Traynor, “Europe's plan for alternative pipeline faces big problems”, The Guardian:
      Britain's leading green commentator, George Monbiot, gives the head of the Campaign to Protect Rural England an unforgettable grilling, asking why the countryside watchdog opposes windfarms - but not opencast coal mines
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. misunderestanding (a quoted misspelling)
    • 2009 January 7, Hugh Muir, The Guardian[3]:
      This was his reply: "Dear Mr Haim Bresheeth, let me deeply and personally apologize to You - my mystake and misunderestanding was not the support of any murdering.
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