User:Visviva/Guardian 20090114

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-01-14 issue of The Guardian which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created.

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32401 tokens ‧ 24932 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 4837 types ‧ 13 (~ 0.269%) words before cleaning ‧ 9 (~ 0.186%) accepted words

2009-01-14[edit]

  1. cousteron
  2. demyship
    • 2009 January 14, Mark Ford, “Mick Imlah”, The Guardian:
      Mick attended Dulwich college, and in 1976 was awarded a demyship to Magdalen College, Oxford.
      add
  3. getouttamyway
    • 2009 January 14, Paul Evans, “Country diary”, The Guardian:
      It makes rapid calls which sound like a getouttamyway siren.
      add
  4. mudlark
    • 2009 January 14, Zoe Williams, “The story of you. Yes, you”, The Guardian:
      In fact, he was a mudlark, which means looking for rags and bones, only in mud.
      add
  5. sauvignons
    • 2009 January 14, Stephen Bates, “Cheer up: at least we're buying more wine than anyone else”, The Guardian:
      White continues to be the favourite wine, taking 45% of the total market, with both Sainsbury and Tesco reporting that their best sellers are Italian proseccos, sauvignons and chardonnays.
      add
  6. traineeships
  7. waterproofers
    • 2009 January 14, Zoe Williams, “The story of you. Yes, you”, The Guardian:
      Amy Winehouse's maternal ancestors were hawkers in Spitalfields, selling fruit and later becoming waterproofers, though cursory research does not reveal what that means.
      add
  8. whiskery

Sequestered[edit]

  1. wondernet -> apparently unique to Zoe Williams, except for this
    • 2009 January 14, Zoe Williams, “The story of you. Yes, you”, The Guardian:
      When the 1901 census went on the wondernet in 2002, the site was overwhelmed within an hour with about 1.2 million requests.
      add