User:Visviva/Guardian 20090117

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-01-17 issue of The Guardian which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created.

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35285 tokens ‧ 27480 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5370 types ‧ 23 (~ 0.428%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-01-17[edit]

  1. autobahn
    • 2009 January 17, Marina Hyde, “Thus spoke Entropa: the EU defined in an Airfix model”, The Guardian:
      Still, it's one less fire to fight for the mortified Czechs, who are frantically highlighting Cerny's insistence that the German entry - an arrangement of strips of autobahn - has nothing of the swastika to it.
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  2. beachscape
    • 2009 January 17, Jonathan Jones, “Turner Watercolours”, The Guardian:
      He is a realist as well as a Romantic, as you can see when you look at the marvel of this exhibition, his great Dawn After the Wreck (c1841), a beachscape of despair that invites direct comparison with the Romantic art of Turner's German contemporary Caspar David Friedrich.
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  3. buyup
    • 2009 January 17, Nicholas Watt and Patrick Wintour, “'I can't be light and witty about the things I do'”, The Guardian:
      But that is far as the praise goes as Hoon dismisses the land buyup that is meant to complicate attempts by BAA to compulsorily purchase land for the runway.
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  4. ghettoisation
    • 2009 January 17, “Letters: Folly of the 'war on terror'”, The Guardian:
      Another perhaps less fragile way forward might be to attack the ghettoisation of communities in UK which become prey to extremist propaganda.
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  5. glitterball
    • 2009 January 17, Esther Addley, “Strictly Come Dancing goes on tour”, The Guardian:
      Last night saw the latest incarnation of the Beeb's cash cow that keeps on mooing, with the opening night of Strictly Come Dancing The Live Tour!, a multi-date glitterball extravaganza that over the next month will hit eight cities around Britain.
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  6. illusional
    • 2009 January 17, Ian Jack, “The era of the true art collector has returned”, The Guardian:
      I looked at fine pictures that embodied what Chavez-Dawson described as "the illusional descriptiveness of figurative art": a Lowry for £650,000, a Peploe for £375,000 and a Lucian Freud etching for £25,000.
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  7. jivers
    • 2009 January 17, Esther Addley, “Strictly Come Dancing goes on tour”, The Guardian:
      Six series in, the BBC 's £80m franchise has become a global bespangled monster, colonising more than 30 countries worldwide and sucking up Australian jivers and Slovakian quick-steppers to spit them out, sequin-clad, on to a TV screen near you.
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  8. loathings
    • 2009 January 17, Marina Hyde, “Thus spoke Entropa: the EU defined in an Airfix model”, The Guardian:
      Each year, it shows how a league of nations can function as an entertaining idea, while still retaining - foregrounding, really - its deepest loathings and pettiest grudges.
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  9. namechecked
    • 2009 January 17, Lucy Mangan, “This week”, The Guardian:
      She namechecked her fellow nominees - except Angelina Jolie, who was probably busy scouring the car park for unattended infants for her collection - before hyperventilating her way offstage.
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  10. pokiness
    • 2009 January 17, Caroline Sullivan, “Emmy the Great”, The Guardian:
      She's joking, by the way - the 12 Bar's pokiness is what she's used to, though she's quietly amassing enough critical support to suggest that there are roomier venues on the horizon.
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  11. poshness
    • 2009 January 17, Sam Wollaston, “Last night's TV”, The Guardian:
      Something about the wild hair, the lived-in features, the enthusiasm, the double-barred poshness ...
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  12. sniffiness
  13. talkshow
  14. underinvested
  15. undivinely
    • 2009 January 17, Sam Wollaston, “Last night's TV”, The Guardian:
      And, if anything, he's got an even wilder look in his eye, a hint of once having lived quite hard, undivinely even.
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  16. unpompous
    • 2009 January 17, Editorial, “Editorial: In praise of ... Rumpole of the Bailey”, The Guardian:
      He was the sort of barrister that those actually called to the bar would like to be: independent, unpompous (barristers were merely "hacks"), ready to interpose themselves between a powerful state and a fundamentally harmless criminal defendant, and a superb performer both in court and in the Fleet Street wine bar Pommeroy's.
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  17. unwitnessed
    • 2009 January 17, Tim Radford, “Weatherwatch: 17 January 2009”, The Guardian:
      On and on, Dickens goes, setting the scene for an unwitnessed murder, back in London where footsteps pass more tranquilly away and "every noise is merged, this moonlight night, into a distant ringing hum, as if the city were a vast glass, vibrating.
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  18. wej
    • 2009 January 17, Julia Pascal, “Time to bury Fagin”, The Guardian:
      Unlike London street talk, New York slang does not use the word "wej" for cash (spell it backwards).
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  19. whoms
    • 2009 January 17, “Letters: Why whom is doomed - and by who”, The Guardian:
      There is a long and noble tradition of putting whoms and whos where prescriptive grammarians don't like them - Shakespeare, the Authorised Version of the Bible, Defoe and so on.
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  20. whos
    • 2009 January 17, “Letters: Why whom is doomed - and by who”, The Guardian:
      There is a long and noble tradition of putting whoms and whos where prescriptive grammarians don't like them - Shakespeare, the Authorised Version of the Bible, Defoe and so on.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. molto -- various uses of "molto sexy", "molto fun", "molto tasty", but always in an Italian context