User:Visviva/Guardian 20090331

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-03-31 issue of The Guardian which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created.

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29820 tokens ‧ 23021 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 4819 types ‧ 19 (~ 0.394%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-03-31[edit]

  1. bangled
    • 2009 March 31, Lawrence Joffe, “Ahmad Hasan Dani”, The Guardian:
      He also showed how they practised yoga and created statuettes of bangled dancing girls and stern-faced priest-kings that delight viewers to this day.
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  2. bellamoids
  3. fujana
    • 2009 March 31, Patrick O'Connor, “Maurice Jarre”, The Guardian:
      For Mad Max Beyond Thunderdrome (1985) he added to the basic symphony orchestra with "four grand pianos plus a pipe organ, digeridoo, fujana, a battery of exotic percussion and three ondes martenots".
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  4. grandstander
  5. labourism
    • 2009 March 31, Paul Kelly, “Brian Barry”, The Guardian:
      And in New York he was a colleague, abrasive as ever, whose mix of intellectual acuteness and straight-forward, old-style English left labourism I never ceased to value.
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  6. leafleters
    • 2009 March 31, Hugh Muir, “Diary”, The Guardian:
      • And finally, a contender for our team of the week award: those uniformed NHS leafleters who went diligently about their work in Ilford, Essex, on Saturday, imploring the populace to healthy living, the better to avoid a stroke; and then, when the task was done, piled into the local Burger King.
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  7. lobotomised
    • 2009 March 31, Brian Logan, “Horne and Corden”, The Guardian:
      Their current BBC3 sketch show has been drubbed by the critics - and there's no improvement on that programme's lobotomised humour at this live outing, a headline performance in aid of the Teenage Cancer Trust.
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  8. phytophthora
    • 2009 March 31, Roger Redfern, “Country diary: North Derbyshire”, The Guardian:
      The beautiful avenue of pollarded specimens in the park at Croft Castle, Herefordshire, immediately comes to mind, but they are at least 250 years old and many are dead or dying of the fungal disease called phytophthora, and the National Trust wouldn't be amused to find tree climbers operating here these days.
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  9. rummagers
    • 2009 March 31, Polly Toynbee, “Jacqui Smith is a victim of the new wave of puritanism”, The Guardian:
      One thing is certain: deep-pocketed tabloids are chasing ministers, hiring Benji the Bin Man-type rummagers, bribing officials or just calculating MPs' property profits from expenses.
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  10. synthesists
    • 2009 March 31, Patrick O'Connor, “Maurice Jarre”, The Guardian:
      In Witness, for example, he employed a group of 10 synthesists, each one working on sections of the score at the same time, while Jarre conducted them as if for a chamber ensemble.
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  11. talkfests
  12. unworked
  13. ventriloquised
    • 2009 March 31, Dominic Crossley, “The press watchdog should not pour scorn on my client, Max Mosley”, The Guardian:
      Leaving aside that he is wrong to say that their evidence was orchestrated or "probably ventriloquised" by the law firm Carter-Ruck (who played no part in my client's case or his evidence to the committee), can it ever be appropriate for the chairman of an organisation that is supposed to regulate the press to pour scorn on an individual who has been the victim of the unlawful activities of the press?
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. digeridoo
    • 2009 March 31, Patrick O'Connor, “Maurice Jarre”, The Guardian:
      For Mad Max Beyond Thunderdrome (1985) he added to the basic symphony orchestra with "four grand pianos plus a pipe organ, digeridoo, fujana, a battery of exotic percussion and three ondes martenots".
      add
  2. eurghh
    • 2009 March 31, Betty Clarke, “Beth Orton”, The Guardian:
      It went when I went eurghh!" she says. "
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