User:Visviva/Medical/By links/D

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  1. dahlin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dahlin (dah'-lin). i. An anilin dye obtained by the action of ethyl iodide on mauvein. It gives a reddish -purple color. 2. A form of inulin obtained from the roots of Inula helenium, See inulin. Syn., aUantin; menyanthin; sinistrin; syaniherin.
  2. damiana - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      damian'a (N.F.). The dried leaves of Turner a diffusa or T. aphrodisiaca, a plant of Mexico and of Central America; stimulant, tonic, and laxative, and is reputed to have aphrodisiac properties; dose, 1520-40 (1.3-2.6), or 15130 (2.0) of the fluidextract.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      damian'a (N.F.). The dried leaves of Turner a diffusa or T. aphrodisiaca, a plant of Mexico and of Central America; stimulant, tonic, and laxative, and is reputed to have aphrodisiac properties; dose, 1520-40 (1.3-2.6), or 15130 (2.0) of the fluidextract.
  3. daphnin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      daphnin (daf'-nin) [60^1 n. laurel], CuHuOi+zHiO. A glucoside from the bark of some species of daphne.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      daphnin (daf'nin). A volatile, acrid glucosid, (',!!,.()., + 2HjO, from DapHne mete'reum. It has vesicating properties.
  4. dartos - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dartos (dar'-tos) [6aprat, flayed]. The contractile musculpfibrous layer beneath the skin of the scrotum, d. muliebris- a similar structure under the skin of the I abia majora.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      dar'tos. Syn.: tunica darta. The subo taneous muscular layer of the scrora continuous above with the superficial f» cia of the abdomen and below with tl-dercin, to flay.]
  5. dartre - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dartre (dor^-fr) [Fr.]. Any herpetic or other chronic skin-disease; a term vaguely used in French and the older English medical literature.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dartre (dar'ter) [Fr.]. Herpes, or any skin disease resembling it.
  6. day-sight - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      day-sight. A condition in which vision is more distinct in a bright light; night-blindness, nyctalopia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      day-sight. Same as night-blindness.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      day-sight. A condition in which vision is more distinct in a bright light; night-blindness, nyctalopia.
  7. dealbation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dealbation (de-al-ba'-shun) [see dtalbatr]. The process or act of becoming or being made white, as by bleaching.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dealbation (de-al-ba'shun) [L. dealbare, to whiten.] Bleaching.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dealbation (de-al-ba'shun). Bleaching.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dealbation (de-al-ba'shun) [L. dealbare, to whiten.] Bleaching.
  8. dealin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      de'alin. Trade name of an antiseptic dressing powder, composed of sodium perborate, boric acid, magnesium carbonate, zinc oxide, starch, and talcum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dealin (de'al-in). A proprietary dressing powder containing sodium perborate, boric acid, magnesium carbonate, zinc oxid, starch, and talcum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      de'alin. Trade name of an antiseptic dressing powder, composed of sodium perborate, boric acid, magnesium carbonate, zinc oxide, starch, and talcum.
  9. deamidase - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      deamidase (de-am'id-as). A ferment which splits adenin and guanin.
  10. debilitant - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      debilitant (de-bil1-it-ant) [debilitare, to weaken], i. An agent allaying excitement. 2. Weakening.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      debil'itant. i. Weakening. ». A quieting agent or one that subdues excitement.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      debilitant (de-bil'it-ant) [L. deb'ilis weak], i. Causing debility. 2. A remedy for too great excitement.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      debil'itant. i. Weakening. ». A quieting agent or one that subdues excitement.
  11. debouchment - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      debouchment (dS-boosh'ment). Opening or emptying into another part.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      debouchment (da-boosh-mawQ [Fr.]. Opening into another part.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      debouchment (dS-boosh'ment). Opening or emptying into another part.
  12. decarbonization - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      decarboniza'tion. The process of arterialization of the blood by oxygenation and the removal of carbon dioxide in the lungs.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      decarboniza'tion. The process of arterialization of the blood by oxygenation and the removal of carbon dioxide in the lungs.
  13. decentered - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      decentered (de-sent1 ^d) [de, from; center]. Out of common center; said of lenses as to focus, or of masses as to equilibrium, etc.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      decentered (de-sen'terd). Said of a lens in which the visual axis does not pass through the axis of the lens.
  14. decerebrize - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      decerebrize (de-ser'-e-briz) [de. from; cerebrum]. To remove the brain, as of a frog, in physiological experiments; decerebrate.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      decer'ebrize. To move the brain, either in craniotomy or in animal experiments.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      decerebrize (de-serVbrlz). To remove the brain in vivisection.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      decer'ebrize. To move the brain, either in craniotomy or in animal experiments.
  15. decidual - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      decidual (de-sid'-u-aD. Belonging to the decidua. d. cells, a proliferation of young connective-tissue cells above the uterine glands, taking place after the ovum is impregnated, and producing an hypertrophy of the mucous membrane of the uterus, d. endometritis, see endometritis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      decid'ual. Relating to the decidua.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      decidual (de-sid'u-al). Pertaining to the decidua. d. cells. See cell.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      decid'ual. Relating to the decidua.
  16. deciduoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      deciduoma (de-sid-u-o'-mah) [deciduo; 6ua, a tumor: pi., deciduomata.] An intrauterine tumor containing decidual relics, and believed to arise from some hyperpjasia of a retained portion of the decidua. By some it is considered a sarcoma, d. malignum, a variety of uterine sarcoma first described by Saenser, which in its microscopic characters strongly resembles decidual tissues. Syn., choroioepithelioma malignum; sarcoma deciduocellulare; syncytioma malignum.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      deciduoma (de-sid-u-o'mah). See syncyiioma. d. in iliL mini. See chorio-epilhclioma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      deciduoma (de-sid-u-o'mah) [decidua + Gr. -w/ia tumor). An intra-uterine neoplasm containing decidual cells; probably derived from portions of retained decidua after abortion. The tumor may be malignant, and is then called d. malig'num and also chorioepUhelioma, on the theory that it is derived from the epithelial structures. d. malig'num. See syncytioma malignum.
  17. decinormal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      decinormal (dts-e-nor'-maT) [deci-; norms, normal]. Having one-tenth the strength of the normal.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      decinormal (des-in-pr'mal) [L. de'cimus tenth + iinr'm-1 rule]. Having one-tenth of the normal or standard strength.
  18. declinator - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      declinator (dtk'-lin-a-tor) [decline]. An instrument for holding the dura apart during trephining.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      declinator. A form of retractor by means of which certain parts are kept out of the way during an operation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      declinator (dek'lin-a-tor). An instrument by which parts (as the montages of the brain) are held aside during an operation.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      declinator. A form of retractor by means of which certain parts are kept out of the way during an operation.
  19. decollation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      decollation (de-kol-a'-shun). See decapitation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      decollation (de-kol-a'shun) (L. de away + col'lum neck]. Decapitation, or beheadal; removal of the head, chiefly of the fetus in difficult labor.
  20. decongestive - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      decongestive (de-kon-jes'-tiv) [de, from; congerere, to bring together]. Relieving congestion.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      deconges'tive. Having the property of reducing congestion.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      decongestive (de-kon-jes'tiv). Reducing congestion.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      deconges'tive. Having the property of reducing congestion.
  21. decussorium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      decussorium (de-kus-o'-re-um) [L.]. An instrument for depressing the dura after trephining.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      decussorium (de-kus-o/re-um). An instrument for depressing the dura mater in trephining.
  22. dedentition - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dedentition (de-den-tish'-un) [de, down; dens, a toot hi. The shedding of the teeth.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dedentition (de-den-tish'un). Loss of teeth, especially the falling out of the teeth consequent upon senile atrophy of the alveoli.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dedentition (de-den-tish'un) [L. de away + dens tooth]. The shedding or loss of teeth.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dedentition (de-den-tish'un). Loss of teeth, especially the falling out of the teeth consequent upon senile atrophy of the alveoli.
  23. dedolation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dedolation (ded-o-la'-shun) [dedolatio, a hewing off]. A cutting off obliquely.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dedolation (de-do-la'shun) [L. dedolare, to hew away.] A slicing wound made by a sharp instrument grazing the surface.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dedolation (ded-o-la'shun). i. A sensation as if the limbs had been bruised. 2. The shaving off of a piece of skin by an oblique cut.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dedolation (de-do-la'shun) [L. dedolare, to hew away.] A slicing wound made by a sharp instrument grazing the surface.
  24. defatigation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      defatiga'tion [L. defatigare, to tire out.] Weariness, exhaustion, extreme fatigue.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      defatigation (dc-fat-ig-a'shun). Overstrain or fatigue of muscular or nervous tissue.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      defatiga'tion [L. defatigare, to tire out.] Weariness, exhaustion, extreme fatigue.
  25. defemination - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      defemination (de-fem-in-a'-shnn). The loss or diminution of female characteristics, with the assumption of male characteristics by a woman.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      defemination (de-fem-i-na'shun) [L. de-, away, femina, woman.] A weakening or loss of feminine characteristics.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      defemination (de-fem-in-a'shun) [L. de from -I fem'ina woman]. Perversion of the instincts of a woman, so that her sexual impulses resemble those of a man.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      defemination (de-fem-i-na'shun) [L. de-, away, femina, woman.] A weakening or loss of feminine characteristics.
  26. deferentectomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      deferentectomy (def-er-ent-ek'-to-me). Excision of the vas deferens.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      deferentectomy (def'e-ren-tek'to-ml) [L. (ductus) deferens + G. tktoml, excision.] Exsection of the ductus deferens, vasectomy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      deferentectomy (def'er-en-tek'to-me). Surgical removal of a vas deferens; vasectomy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      deferentectomy (def'e-ren-tek'to-ml) [L. (ductus) deferens + G. tktoml, excision.] Exsection of the ductus deferens, vasectomy.
  27. defervescent - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      defervescent (def-er-ves'ent). Causing reduction of fever: also a remedy so acting.
  28. deganglionate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      deganglionate (de-gan'-gle-on-at). To remove a gangfion or ganglia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      deganglionate (de-gang'gll-on-at). To deprive of ganglia,
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      deganglionate (de-gan'gte-on-at). To deprive of a ganglion; to remove a ganglion or ganglia from.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      deganglionate (de-gang'gll-on-at). To deprive of ganglia,
  29. deglutible - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      deglutible (de-glootr-ibl) [deglutitio, a swallowing]. Capable of swallowing, or of being swallowed.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      deglutible (de-glu'tib-1). Capable of being swallowed.
  30. degote - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      degote (df-guf) [Russ.l. Oil of white birch.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      degote (de-got') [Russ.]. Tarry oil of white birch: used in the arts, and to some extent in medicine.
  31. dejecta - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dejecta (de-jekt'-ah) [dejicere, to throw down]. Intestinal evacuations; alvine discharges; fecal matter. Excrementitious matter in general.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      dejecta (de-jek'tah). PI. The alvine evacuations.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dejecta (de-jek'tah) [L., pi.]. Excrementitious substances.
  32. delactation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      delactation (de-lak-ta'-skun'). See ablactation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      delacta'tion. Weaning.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      delactation (de-lak-ta'shun) [L. de from + lactation], i. Weaning. 2. The cessation of lactation.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      delacta'tion. Weaning.
  33. delirifacient - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      delirifacient (de-lir-I-fa'shent) [L. delirium + foetre, to make.] i. Causing delirium, deliriant. a. A deliriant (2).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      delirifacient (de-lir-I-fa'shent) [L. delirium + foetre, to make.] i. Causing delirium, deliriant. a. A deliriant (2).
  34. delitescence - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      delitescence (del-it-es'-ens) [delilescere. to lie hid]. The sudden disappearance of inflammation by resolution.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      delitescence (del-I-tes'ens) [L. dtlitsscm, to lie hidden.] i. The sudden subsidence of symptoms; disappearance of a tumor or a cutaneous lesion, a. Period of incubation of an infectious disease.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      delitescence (de-lit-es'enz). An unusually complete and speedy resolution of an inflammation. [Lat., dclitescere, to be hidden.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      delitescence (del-I-tes'ens) [L. dtlitsscm, to lie hidden.] i. The sudden subsidence of symptoms; disappearance of a tumor or a cutaneous lesion, a. Period of incubation of an infectious disease.
  35. demodectic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      demodectic (dem-o-dek'tik). Pertaining to, or caused by, Demodex.
  36. demonopathy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      demonopathy (de-mon-op'-a-the) [&aifu*i>, a demon; Tt&bos, disease). Same as demonomania,
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      demonopathy (de-mon-op'a-thl) [G. daimdn, a spirit, + pathos, suffering.] Demonomania.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      demonopathy (de-mon-op'ath-e) [Gr. tal^ur demon I nnOai disease]. Demonomania.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      demonopathy (de-mon-op'a-thl) [G. daimdn, a spirit, + pathos, suffering.] Demonomania.
  37. demonophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      demonophobia (de-mon-o-fof-be-ah) [taL^ta*, a devil; &>0ot, fear]. Morbid dread of devils and demons.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      demonophobia (de-mon-o-fo'W-ah) [G. daimSn, a spirit, + phobos, fear.] A fear of the devil or of spirits.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      demonophobia (de"mo-no-fo'be-ah) [Gr. Saliua> demon + ipbfim fear). Morbid fear of demons.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      demonophobia (de-mon-o-fo'W-ah) [G. daimSn, a spirit, + phobos, fear.] A fear of the devil or of spirits.
  38. denarcotize - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      denarcotize (de-nar'ko-tiz). To remove narcotin from an opiate; to deprive of narcotic properties.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      denarcotize (de-nar'ko-tlz). To deprive of narcotin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      denarcotize (de-nar'ko-tiz). To remove narcotin from an opiate; to deprive of narcotic properties.
  39. dendroid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dendroid (den'droyd) [G. dendron, tree, + eidos, appearance.] Tree-like, dendriform, arborescent, branching.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dendroid (den'droid) [Gr. SirSpor tree + «l&» form]. Branching like a tree or shrub.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dendroid (den'droyd) [G. dendron, tree, + eidos, appearance.] Tree-like, dendriform, arborescent, branching.
  40. dentalgia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dentalgia (den-tal'-je-ah) [dens; &A>«. pain]. Toothache.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dental'gia [L. dtns(dent-'), tooth, + algos, pain.] Odontalgia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dentalgia (den-tal'je-ah) [L. dens tooth + Or. AX-yof pain). Toothache; odontalgia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dental'gia [L. dtns(dent-'), tooth, + algos, pain.] Odontalgia.
  41. dentatum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dentatum (den-ta'-tum) [L.]. The dentate nucleus of the cerebellum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dentatum (den-tah'tum) [L. neut. of dentatus, toothed.] Nucleus dentatus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dentatum (den-ta'tum) [L. " toothed "I. The nucleus dentatus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dentatum (den-tah'tum) [L. neut. of dentatus, toothed.] Nucleus dentatus.
  42. dentification - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dentification \to make]. The formation of teeth; dentition.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dentification (den-tif-ik-a'shun). The formation of dentin or tooth-substance.
  43. dentiform - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dentiform (den'-tif-orm) [dens; forma, shape]. Odontoid, tooth-like.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      den'tiform. Having the form of a tooth or of teeth. [Lat., dens, tooth, + forma, form.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dentiform (den'tif-orm). Shaped like a tooth.
  44. dentigerous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dentigerous (den-tij'-er-us) [dens; gerere, to carry]. Bearing or containing teeth, as a dentigerous cyst.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dentigerous (den-tij'er-us) [L. dens(deni-'), tooth, + gerere, to bear.] Having or containing teeth, as a dentigerous cyst.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dentigerous (den-tij'er-us) [L. dens tooth + ger'ere to carry]- Containing or bearing a tooth or teeth.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dentigerous (den-tij'er-us) [L. dens(deni-'), tooth, + gerere, to bear.] Having or containing teeth, as a dentigerous cyst.
  45. dentilabial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dentilabial (den-le-la'-be-al) [dens; labium, lip]. Relating to the teeth and lips.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dentilabial (den-ti-la'be-al) [L. dens tooth , la'bium lip]. Pertaining to the teeth and lips.
  46. dentilingual - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dentilingual (den-ti-lin'-gwal) [dens; lingua, tongue]. Relating to the teeth and tongue.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dentilingual (den-tl-ling'gwal) [L. dens, tooth, + lingua, tongue.] Relating to the teeth and tongue.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dentilingual (den-ti-lin'gwal) [L. dens tooth + lin'gua tongue]. Pertaining to the teeth and tongue.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dentilingual (den-tl-ling'gwal) [L. dens, tooth, + lingua, tongue.] Relating to the teeth and tongue.
  47. dentinoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dentinoid (den'-tin-oid). i. Similar to dentine. 2. Pertaining to an odqntoma.
  48. dentiparous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dentiparous (den-tip'ar-us). Pertaining to the production ot teeth.
  49. dentoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dentoid (den'-toid) [dens; tliot, resemblance]. Tooth-like.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      den'toid [L. dens(dent-), tooth, + eidos, resemblance.] Odontoid, dentiform.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dentoid (den'toid) [L. dens tooth + Gr. elios form]. Tooth shaped.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      den'toid [L. dens(dent-), tooth, + eidos, resemblance.] Odontoid, dentiform.
  50. denutrition - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      denutrition (dc-nu-trish'-un) [de, from; nutrire, to nourish], i. Faulty or absent nutrition, a. An atrophy and degeneration of tissue arising from lack of nutrition.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      denutrition (de-nu-trish'un) [L. de, from, + nutria, I nourish.] Want or failure of nutrition.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      denutrition (de-nu-trish'un). A withdrawal or failure of the nutritive processes, with consequent atrophy and degeneration.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      denutrition (de-nu-trish'un) [L. de, from, + nutria, I nourish.] Want or failure of nutrition.
  51. deobstruent - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      deobstruent (de-ob'-slroo-cnt) [de; obstruere, to obstruct], i. Removing obstruction. 2. A medicine that removes obstruction; an aperient.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      deobstruent (de-ob'stru-ent) [L. de- priv. + 06struere, to obstruct.] i. Relieving or removing obstruction, 2. An agent which removes an obstruction to secretion or excretion; resolvent.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      deobstruent (de-ob'stru-ent) [L. de- priv. + 06struere, to obstruct.] i. Relieving or removing obstruction, 2. An agent which removes an obstruction to secretion or excretion; resolvent.
  52. deoppilation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      deoppilation (de-op-il-a'shun) [L. de away + oppUo/tio obstruction]. The removal of obstructions.
  53. deorsumduction - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      deorsumduction (dc-or-sum-duk'~shun). A downward movement, as of the eye.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      deorsumduction (de-or"sum-duk'shun) [L. deorsum, downward, + ducere, to lead.] Bending, or turning downward.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      deorsumduction (de-or"sum-duk'shun) [L. deorsum, downward, + ducere, to lead.] Bending, or turning downward.
  54. deozonize - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      deozonize (de-o'-zon-ls) [de, from; ozone}. To deprive of ozone.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      deo'zonize. To deprive of ozone.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      deo'zonize. To deprive of ozone.
  55. deplumation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      deplumation (de-pltt-ma'-shun) [de, down; off; pluma, feather]. The loss of the eyelashes.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      depluma'tion [L. deplumare, to pull out feathers.] Falling out of the eyelashes.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      deplumation (dep-lu-ma'shun) [L. de from + plu'nid down]. Loss of the eyelashes by disease.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      depluma'tion [L. deplumare, to pull out feathers.] Falling out of the eyelashes.
  56. depositive - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      depositive (de-pos'-il-it) [deposit], A term applied to that state of the skin in which lymph is* poured out and papules arise.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      depositive (de-pos'it-iv). Depositing: said of the condition in which lymph is exuded into the derma, forming papules.
  57. depurant - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dep'urant [L. depurare, to purify.] i. Purifying, removing waste products. 2. An agent which promotes the excretion and removal of waste material.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      depurant (dep'u-rant). A purifying agent or drug.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dep'urant [L. depurare, to purify.] i. Purifying, removing waste products. 2. An agent which promotes the excretion and removal of waste material.
  58. depurator - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      depurator (dep'-H-ra-tor) [depurare, to purify]. A drug or device for cleansing.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      depurator (dep'u-ra-tor) [L. de away + pt/rtts pure], i. A depurative agent. 2. A vacuumproducing apparatus for stimulating the excretory function of the skin.
  59. deric - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      der'ic [G. deros, skin.] Relating to the ectoderm, as distinguished from enteric.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      deric (der'ik) [Gr. Stpos skin]. Pertaining to the ectoderm; the opposite of enteric.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      der'ic [G. deros, skin.] Relating to the ectoderm, as distinguished from enteric.
  60. derivant - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      derivant (der'-iv-ant) [see dentation]. Derivative; a derivative drug.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      der'ivant. Derivative.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      derivant (derMv-ant). i. Derivative. 2. A derivative agent.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      der'ivant. Derivative.
  61. dermad - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dermad (dcr'-mad) [derm; ad, to]. Externally; toward the akin; ectad.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      der'mad [G. derma, skin, + L. ad, to.] In the direction of the outer integument.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dermad (der'mad). Toward the integument.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      der'mad [G. derma, skin, + L. ad, to.] In the direction of the outer integument.
  62. dermalgia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dermalgia (der-mal'-je-ah). See dermalalgta.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dermal'gia. Dermatalgia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dermalgia ((ler-mal'je-ah). Same as dermatalgia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dermal'gia. Dermatalgia.
  63. dermatic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dermatic (ilrr-m,n'-il[itpiia, the skin). I. Relating to the skin. 2. A remedy for diseases of the skin. •
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dermatic. Dermal. *
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dermatic (der-mat'ik). Dermal, derma tin (der'mat-in). A powder of starch, talc, kaolin, and salicylic acid: employed in skin diseases. , • , • ._,
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dermatic. Dermal. *
  64. dermatoma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dermatoma (der-mat-o'-mah) [dermato-; 6fta, a tumor], A tumor of the skin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dermato'ma [G. derma, skin.] A circumscribed thickening or hypertrophy of the skin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dermatoma (der-mat-o'mah) [Gr. 5ipna skin • -uita tumor). An abnormal or perverted growth of skin tissue, corneal d., a tumorous growth upon the cornea of animals: its surface contains hair.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dermato'ma [G. derma, skin.] A circumscribed thickening or hypertrophy of the skin.
  65. dermatomycosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dermatomycosis (drr-tnat-o-nti-kti1-. i- >. [dermato-; mycosis]. Any skin disease caused by a vegetable parasite, d. achorina. Seefavus. d. barbae nodosa. See sycosis parasitaria. d. diffusa. See tinea imbri* cata. d. favosa, favus of the skin, exclusive of that of the hair and nails, d. furfuracea. See tinea versicolor. d. maculovesiculosa. See tinea trichophytina. d. marginata. See eczema marginatum. d. palmellina, a parasitic disease described by Pick as affecting the axillae, the chest, the backs of the hands, the inner surfaces of the thighs, and the pubes. It is characterized by the presence of rounded spores adherent to the hairs, d. pustulosa. See impetigo contagiosa.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      der"matomyco'sis [G. derma(dermat-), skin, -f mykes, fungus.] A skin disease due to the presence of a vegetable microparasite. blastoxnyce'tic d., cutaneous blastomycosis. d. furfura'cea [L. branny], tinea versicolor. d. trichophyti'na, tinea trichophytina.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      der"matomyco'sis [G. derma(dermat-), skin, -f mykes, fungus.] A skin disease due to the presence of a vegetable microparasite. blastoxnyce'tic d., cutaneous blastomycosis. d. furfura'cea [L. branny], tinea versicolor. d. trichophyti'na, tinea trichophytina.
  66. dermitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dermitis (der-mi'-tis). See dermatitis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dermitis (dur-mi'(me')tis). Dermatitis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dermitis (dcr-mi'tis) [Gr. iip/za skin + -iru inflammation]. Inflammation of the skin. dermoblast (der'mo-blast) [Gr. ~ni,>p.a. skin I- (IXairrin germ). That part of the mesoblast which develops into the true skin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dermitis (dur-mi'(me')tis). Dermatitis.
  67. dermographia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dermographia (der-mo-graf'-e-ah) [dermo-; -fpatbtiv, to write]. A condition of the skin in which tracings made with the finger-nail or a blunt instrument are followed by elevations at the points irritated. It is common in the condition termed vasomotor ataxia.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      dermographia (der-mo-gra'fe-ah). The reaction of the erector pilae muscles and vascular supply of the skin to light scratching. [Gr., derma, skin, ■+graphein, to write.]
  68. dermographism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dermographism (der-mof-raf-ixm). Autographism. See autographic skin and urticaria faftitia.
  69. dermopathic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dermopath'ic. Relating to a skin disease.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dermopath'ic. Relating to a skin disease.
  70. dermopathy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dermopathy (der-motf-a-the) {dermo-; v&Bos, disease]. Any skin disease.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dermop'athy [G. derma, skin, + pathos, suffering.] Any skin disease, dermatosis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dermop'athy [G. derma, skin, + pathos, suffering.] Any skin disease, dermatosis.
  71. desmopathy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      desmopathy (des-mop'-a-the) [desmo-; ritfoj, disease]. Any disebse of a ligament.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      desmopathy (dez-mop'a-thl) [G. desmos, band, + pathos, suffering.] A disease of ligaments.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      desmopathy (des-mop'ath-e) [Gr. Staiiln band 4Triiftm- disease]. Any disease of the ligaments.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      desmopathy (dez-mop'a-thl) [G. desmos, band, + pathos, suffering.] A disease of ligaments.
  72. desmoplastic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      desmoplastic (dez-mo-plas'tik) [G. desmos, a band or bond, + plastikos, relating to moulding.] Causing or forming adhesions.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      desmoplastic (des-mo-plas'tik). [Gr otouk band ITAaoofi!' to form]. Producing or forming adhesions.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      desmoplastic (dez-mo-plas'tik) [G. desmos, a band or bond, + plastikos, relating to moulding.] Causing or forming adhesions.
  73. despumation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      despumation (des-pu-ma'-shun) [despumare. to skim froth]. The purification of a liquid by removal of the scum or froth.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      despumation (des-pu-ma'shun) [L. despumare, to skim.] i. The rising of impurities to the surface of a liquid, a. The skimming off of impurities on the surface of a liquid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      despumation (des-pu-ma'shun) [L. despumare, to skim.] i. The rising of impurities to the surface of a liquid, a. The skimming off of impurities on the surface of a liquid.
  74. detorsion - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      detorsion (de-tor'-shun) [detorouere, to turn]. The correction of an abnormal curvature; the restoration of a deformed part to its normal position.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      detorsion (de-tor^shun). The correction of a curvature or deformity.
  75. detoxicate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      detoxicate [de-toksl-kat) [L. de, from, + toxicum. poison.] To diminish or remove the poisonous quality of any substance; to lessen the virulence of any pathogenic organism.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      detoxicate (de-toks'ik-at). To remove the toxic quality of a substance.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      detoxicate [de-toksl-kat) [L. de, from, + toxicum. poison.] To diminish or remove the poisonous quality of any substance; to lessen the virulence of any pathogenic organism.
  76. detruncation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      detruncation (de-trun-ka'-shun). See decapitation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      detrunca'tion. Decapitation; removal and delivery of the trunk of the fetus, the head being impacted.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      detruncation (de-trun-ka'shun) [L. de off + Irun'cus trunk). Decapitation, or decollation; beheadal, chiefly of the fetus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      detrunca'tion. Decapitation; removal and delivery of the trunk of the fetus, the head being impacted.
  77. deuteropathy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      deuteropathy (dS-ler-op'-a-lht) [deutero-; x-tfoi. a disease]. A disease that is secondary to another.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      deuterop'athy [G. deuttros. second, + pathos, suffering.] A secondary disease or symptom.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      deuteropathy (du-ter-op'ath-e) [Gr. otvrtpm second + -rraOin disease]. A disease that is secondary to another disease.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      deuterop'athy [G. deuttros. second, + pathos, suffering.] A secondary disease or symptom.
  78. deutoplasm - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      deutoplasm (du'-to-plazm) [deutero-; - ,v«,..n . formed material], A store of nutrient material in the ->vum, from which the protoplasm draws to support its growth.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      deu'toplasm. Deuteroplasm, the nutritive portion of the yolk made up of numerous retractile fatty and albuminoid bodies containing phosphorus and various salts.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      deu'toplasm. Deuteroplasm, the nutritive portion of the yolk made up of numerous retractile fatty and albuminoid bodies containing phosphorus and various salts.
  79. dextrad - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dextrad (deks1-trad) {doctor; ad, to]. Toward the right side.
  80. dextrocardia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dextrocardia (deks-tro-kor'-de-ah) [dextro-; taptla, heart]. Transposition of the heart to the right side of the thorax. *
  81. diabrosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diabrosis (di-ab-ro'-sis) [see diabrotic]. Corrosion; erosion, or u Ice rat ion.
  82. diabrotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diabrotic (di-ab-rot'-ik) [feafrwrtxii; md, through; , ' style='color:red;'>... to eat], i. Corrosive. 2. A corrosive substance.
  83. diachoresis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diachoresis (dt-ak-o-re1-sis) [5iaxwpij<m, a passing through]. Excretion or passage of feces.
  84. diachylon - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diachylon (di-ak'-il-on) (6i&, through; xvXfe. juice]. Lead-plaster. See plumbi oxidum under plumbum.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      diachylon (di-ak'il-on). A term origina':> applied to plaster made with the juices of plants, d. ointment. Lead oin*,
  85. diacrisis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diacrisis (di-akf-ris-is) [5td, a part; npi»w, to separate or secrete; pi., diacrises]. i. A critical discharge. 2. A change or disorder in a secretion. *. Any disease marked by altered secretions, d..
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      diacrisis (di-ak'ris-is). 1. A change in the character of a secretion. 2. A crisis or a critical evacuation. 3. Diagnosis. follicular d. An abnormal change in the secretions of follicular glands (e. g., in those of the intestines during inflammatory diarrhea). [Gr., diakrinein, to separate.]
  86. diactinic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diactinic (di-ak-tin'-ik). Capable of transmitting actinic rays.
  87. diagraph - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diagraph (di'-ag-ro/) I'm:-, through; ,,.a^«i», to record]. An apparatus for recording the outlines of a part.
  88. dialyzer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dialyzer (di'-al-i-zrr) [dialysis]. An apparatus for effecting dialysis; also the porous septum or diaphragm of such an apparatus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      di'alyzer. A membrane for use in dialysis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      di'alyzer. A membrane for use in dialysis.
  89. diamylene - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diam'ylene. Dipentene.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      diamylene (di-am'il-en). Same as dipenlene.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diam'ylene. Dipentene.
  90. diaphanometer - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diaphanometer (di-af-an-om'-ei-er). An instrument for observing the transparency of fluids. See also lattice ope.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      diaphanometer (di-af-an-om'et-er). An apparatus devised by Donne for estimating the amount of solids in a fluid by observing the degree of its transparency. [Gr., dia, through, + phainein, to appear, -+- metron, a measure.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      diaphanometer (di"a-fa-nom'et-er) [Gr. faaufavip translucent + pirpov measure). An instrument for testing milk, urine, and other iluid- by means of transmitted light.
  91. diaphanoscope - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diaphanoscope (di-af-an'-o-skop) [Siajtarfa, translucent; ffxortlv, to inspect]. An instrument for illuminating the interior of a body-cavity so as to render the boundaries of the cavity visible from the exterior.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diaphan'oscope [G. diaphanis, transparent, + shaped, I examine.] An instrument for illuminating the interior of a cavity in order to determine the translucency of its walls.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      diaphanoscope (di-af-an'o-skop). An apparatus for illuminating the internal parts of the body, so as to render the overlying structures diaphanous, for purposes of visual examination. See polyscope and cystoscope. [Gr., diaphanes, transparent, -fskopein, to examine.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      diaphanoscope (di-af-an'o-skop) [Gr. &d through + -Tui/riif to view]. An instrument for illuminating a IH «ly-cavity and rendering it visible.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diaphan'oscope [G. diaphanis, transparent, + shaped, I examine.] An instrument for illuminating the interior of a cavity in order to determine the translucency of its walls.
  92. diaphanoscopy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diaphanoscopy (di-af-an-os'-ko-pe) [see diapkanoscope]. Examination of body-cavities by means of an introduced incandescent electric light.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diaphanos'copy. Examination of a cavity, such as the antrum of Highmore, by means of the diaphanoscope.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      diaphanoscopy (dfaf-an-oyko-pe). Examination with the diaphanoscope.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diaphanos'copy. Examination of a cavity, such as the antrum of Highmore, by means of the diaphanoscope.
  93. diaphemetric - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diaphemetric (di-af-em-ct'-rik) f.5i«. through; &$%• touch; utrpo*, measure]. Pertaining to measurements of tactile sensibility.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diaphemetric (di"a-fe-met'rik) [G. dia, through, + haphe, touch, + metron, measure.] Relating to the determination of the degree of tactile sensibility.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      diaphemetric (di"af-e-met'rik) [Gr. itd through + d^ij touch + n'l-rpov measure]. Pertaining to the measurement of tactile sensibility.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diaphemetric (di"a-fe-met'rik) [G. dia, through, + haphe, touch, + metron, measure.] Relating to the determination of the degree of tactile sensibility.
  94. diaphragma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diaphrag'ma [G.] Diaphragm, d. pel'vif [BNA], diaphragm of the pelvis, the levatores ani and the coccygei on either side of the inner surface of the pelvis, d. sel'las [BNA], tentorium of the hypophysis, a fold of dura mater extending transversely across the sella and roofing over the hypophysis or pituitary body; it is perforated in its center for the passage of the infundibulum. d. urogenita'le [BNA], triangular ligament, urogenital trigone; a musculomembranous structure filling the space under the pubic arch not closed by the pelvic diaphragm.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      diaphragma (di-a-frag'ma). See table of muscles, under muscle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      diaphragma (di-af-rag'mah) [B N A]. I.. for diaphragm, d. pel'vis [B N A], the portion of the floor of the pelvis formed by the levatores ani muscles, d. sel'lae [B N A], a ring-shaped fold of dura mater covering the pituitary fossa, and containing an aperture for the infundibulum. d. urogenita'le [B N A], the triangular ligament of the pelvis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diaphrag'ma [G.] Diaphragm, d. pel'vif [BNA], diaphragm of the pelvis, the levatores ani and the coccygei on either side of the inner surface of the pelvis, d. sel'las [BNA], tentorium of the hypophysis, a fold of dura mater extending transversely across the sella and roofing over the hypophysis or pituitary body; it is perforated in its center for the passage of the infundibulum. d. urogenita'le [BNA], triangular ligament, urogenital trigone; a musculomembranous structure filling the space under the pubic arch not closed by the pelvic diaphragm.
  95. diapophysis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diapophysis (di-ap-off'-is-is) [6i&, apart; Air^um, an outgrowth]. The superior or articular part of a transverse process of a vertebra.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diapoph'ysis [G. dia, through, + apophysis, an
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diapoph'ysis [G. dia, through, + apophysis, an
  96. diascope - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      diascope (di'as-kop) [Gr. bio. through + am-rtiv to view]. A glass plate pressed against the skin for observing the anatomic changes other than those of congestion.
  97. diastaltic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diastaltic (di-as~tal'-tik) [5iA, apart; oreXXtii', to send ]. Reflex; performed (as are many reflex actions) through the medium of the spinal cord.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diastal'tic [G. dia, through, + Stella, I send.] Reflex.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      diastaltic (di-as-taTtik) [Gr. Sid apart + art\\tiv to send]. Performed reflexly through the medium of the spinal cord.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diastal'tic [G. dia, through, + Stella, I send.] Reflex.
  98. diastatic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diastat'ic. i. Relating to diastase, a. Relating to a diastasis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      diastatic (di-as-tat'ik). i. Pertaining to diastase. 2. Pertaining to diastasis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diastat'ic. i. Relating to diastase, a. Relating to a diastasis.
  99. diaster - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diaster (di-as'-Ur). The karyokinetic figure assumed by the aster of a dividing nucleus before the formation of the stars at the ends of the nuclear spindle. It is the sixth stage of karyokinesis. See karyokinesis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dias'ter [G. di-, two, + astir star.] The doublestar figure in mitosis, formed just before the division of the nucleus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      diaster (di'as-ter) [Gr. 5id twice + &otjp star). The double-star figure formed in karyokinesis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dias'ter [G. di-, two, + astir star.] The doublestar figure in mitosis, formed just before the division of the nucleus.
  100. diathermal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diather'mal [G. dia, through, + thtrmos, heat.] Diathermanous.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      diathermal (di-ah-ther/mal). Same as diathtrmanous.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diather'mal [G. dia, through, + thtrmos, heat.] Diathermanous.
  101. diathermanous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diather'manous [G. dia, through, + thermaino, I heat.] Permeable by heat rays
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diather'manous [G. dia, through, + thermaino, I heat.] Permeable by heat rays
  102. diathermia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      diathermia (di-ath-er'me-ah). Thermopenetration.
  103. diazo- - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diazo- (di-at-o-) [dis; atotum, nitrogen]. A prefix. signifying that a compound contains phenyl, C«H». united with a radical consisting of two nitrogen atoms, d.-reaction, d.-test, a urinary test, valuable in the diagnosis of enteric fever. The solutions required are: (a) A saturated solution of sulphanilic acid in a 5 % solution of hydrochloric acid; (b) a 0.5 % solution of sodium nitrite. Mix a and b in the proportion of 40 Cc. of a to i Cc. of b, and to a few cubic centimeters add an equal volume of urine, and, after shaking well, allow a few drops of ammonia to flow down the side of the tube. A garnet-red color at the point of contact denotes the reaction, or a rosepink foam after shaking.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diazo- (di-az'o) [G. di-, two, + Fr. azote, nitrogen.] A prefix denoting a compound containing two linked nitrogen atoms, united to an aromatic group and to an acid radical, diazo-reac'tion, Ehrlich's reaction; a reaction obtained by treating the urine in the manner to be described; it has an uncertain*diagnostic value in typhoid fever and an unfavorable prognostic value in tuberculosis. To I inch of urine in the testtube are added a like amount of a saturated solution of pure sulphanilic acid in 5 per cent, hydrochloric acid, and 2 drops of J per cent, solution of sodium nitrate; this is shaken until an abundant froth forms and then a little spirit of ammonia is poured down the side of the tube. A positive reaction is indicated by a pink coloration of the froth and sometimes, but less certainly, by a claret color of the subjacent urine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diazo- (di-az'o) [G. di-, two, + Fr. azote, nitrogen.] A prefix denoting a compound containing two linked nitrogen atoms, united to an aromatic group and to an acid radical, diazo-reac'tion, Ehrlich's reaction; a reaction obtained by treating the urine in the manner to be described; it has an uncertain*diagnostic value in typhoid fever and an unfavorable prognostic value in tuberculosis. To I inch of urine in the testtube are added a like amount of a saturated solution of pure sulphanilic acid in 5 per cent, hydrochloric acid, and 2 drops of J per cent, solution of sodium nitrate; this is shaken until an abundant froth forms and then a little spirit of ammonia is poured down the side of the tube. A positive reaction is indicated by a pink coloration of the froth and sometimes, but less certainly, by a claret color of the subjacent urine.
  104. diblastula - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diblas'tula. An embryonal sac having two celllayers, ectoderm and entoderm.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      diblastula (di-blas'tu-lah) [Gr. Sis two + UA blastula in which the ectoderm and entoderm are both present.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diblas'tula. An embryonal sac having two celllayers, ectoderm and entoderm.
  105. dicalcic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dicalcic (di-kal'-sik). Containing two atoms of calcium in each molecule, d. orthophosphate, CajHj(PO<)i, a salt occurring in urinary deposits.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dical'cic. Noting a chemical compound having two calcium atoms in each molecule.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dicalcic (di-kal'sik). Having in each molecule two atoms of calcium.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dical'cic. Noting a chemical compound having two calcium atoms in each molecule.
  106. dichlamydeous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dichlamydeous (di-klam-id'-e-us) [Ait, two; x^w. a mantle]. In biology, applied to flowers having both floral envelopes.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dichlamydeous (di-klam-id'e-us) [G. di-, two, + chlamys(chlamyd-), cloak.] Noting a flower having both calyx and corolla, or a double perianth.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dichlamydeous (di-klam-id'e-us) [G. di-, two, + chlamys(chlamyd-), cloak.] Noting a flower having both calyx and corolla, or a double perianth.
  107. dichlorhydrin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dichlorhy'drin. A colorless, odorless fluid prepared by heating anhydrous glycerin with aj parts of sulphur monochloride; a solvent of resins.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dichlorhydrin (di-klor-hi'drin). A colorless fluid used as a solvent for resins and prepared by heating anhydrous glycerin with sulphur monochlorid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dichlorhy'drin. A colorless, odorless fluid prepared by heating anhydrous glycerin with aj parts of sulphur monochloride; a solvent of resins.
  108. dichromasy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dichromasy idi-kro'-mtis-c) [dii, two; xpu/fa, color]. The condition of a dichromat; inability to distinguish more than two colors. ;|0
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dichromasy (di-kro'mas-e). Ability to perceive but two colors.
  109. dichromat - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dichromat (di -kro-mat). A person with dichromatopsia. Cf. monochromat; bichromat.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dichromat (di'kro-mat). A person who can distinguish only two of the primary colors.
  110. dichromic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dichromic (di-krcf-mik). i. Marked by two colors. a. Containing two atoms of chromium.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dichromic (di-kro'mik). Dichromate (i).
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      dichromic (di-kro'mik). Containing 2 atoms of chromium.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dichromic (di-kro'mik) [Gr. Sis twice + color]. Distinguishing only two colors.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dichromic (di-kro'mik). Dichromate (i).
  111. dicrotic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dicrotic (,Ii-ltriit'-,/-i |,,/.,..,; „. double beating]. Having a double beat. d. pulse. See d* erotism, d. wave, the recoil-wave of the sphygmographic tracing, generated by closure of the aortic valves.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dicrot'ic [G. di-, two, + krotos, a beating.] Relating to dicrotism, noting a pulse with two beats for each cardiac systole, d. notch, the notch in a pulse-tracing which precedes the second or dicrotic wave. d. pulse, one with two wellmarked beats for each ventricular contraction. d. wave, the second rise in the tracing of a dicrotic pulse.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      dicrotic (di-krot'ik). Beating doubly, i. e., showing two waves for each cardiac systole; said of the pulse, d. notch. The notch or negative wave on the descending limb of the sphygmogram, just preceding the dicrotic wave. d. pulse. See under false, d. wave. The conspicuous wave seen about midway on the descending limb of the sphygmogram. [Gr., dis, twice, + krplcin, to beat.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dicrotic (di-krot'Uc) [Gr. tlxporos beating double]. Having or pertaining to a double beat, as of the pulse.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dicrot'ic [G. di-, two, + krotos, a beating.] Relating to dicrotism, noting a pulse with two beats for each cardiac systole, d. notch, the notch in a pulse-tracing which precedes the second or dicrotic wave. d. pulse, one with two wellmarked beats for each ventricular contraction. d. wave, the second rise in the tracing of a dicrotic pulse.
  112. dicrotism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dicrotism (dik'ro-tizm). The occurrence of a double pulse-wave in each arterial beat.
  113. didactylism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      didactylism (di-dak'til-izm) [G. di-, two, 4- daktylos, finger or toe.] The condition of having but two fingers on a hand or two toes on a foot.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      didactylism (di-dak'til-izm) [Gr. Jis twice + iAicn/Xos finger]. The congenital quality of having only two digits on one hand or foot.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      didactylism (di-dak'til-izm) [G. di-, two, 4- daktylos, finger or toe.] The condition of having but two fingers on a hand or two toes on a foot.
  114. didymus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      didymus (did'-im-us) [Siluitot, twin], A twin; a twin-monstrosity; a testicle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      didymus (didl-mus) [G. didymos, a twin.] Testis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      didymus (did'im-us) [Gr. ilivitos twin). A testicle.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      didymus (didl-mus) [G. didymos, a twin.] Testis.
  115. diestrum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diestrum (di-es'trum) [G. di-, two, + oislros, a mad desire.] An interval of abnormally short duration between two periods of heat in an animal.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      diestrum (di-es'trum). See dicestrum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diestrum (di-es'trum) [G. di-, two, + oislros, a mad desire.] An interval of abnormally short duration between two periods of heat in an animal.
  116. diffluence - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diffluence (dtf'-lu-enz) \diffluert, to flow apart]. The condition of being almost liquefied.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diffluence (dif'lu-ens) [L. dis-. asunder, + fluere, to flow.] Deliquescence, becoming fluid.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diffluence (dif'lu-ens) [L. dis-. asunder, + fluere, to flow.] Deliquescence, becoming fluid.
  117. diffusate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diffusate (dif-a-sat) [diffuse]. The portion of the liquid which passes through the animal membrane in dialysis, and holds crystalloid matter in solution. Dialysate.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diffusate (dl-fu'zat) [L. diffundere, to pour in different directions.] Dialysate; the soluble crystalloid substance separated by dialysis from the colloid matter in a mixture.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diffusate (dl-fu'zat) [L. diffundere, to pour in different directions.] Dialysate; the soluble crystalloid substance separated by dialysis from the colloid matter in a mixture.
  118. digastricus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      digastricus (di-gasr trtk-us). The dfgastric muscle. SeemusfUs, table of.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      digas'tricus. The digastric muscle, see under ntusculus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      digastricus (di-gas'trik-us). See muscles, table of.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      digas'tricus. The digastric muscle, see under ntusculus.
  119. digestant - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      digestant (di-jestf-ant) [digest]. A substance that assists digestion of the food.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diges'tant. i. Aiding digestion, i. An agent which favors or assists the process of digestion.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      digestant (di-jes'tant). i. Assisting or stimulating digestion. 2. A remedy which aids digestion.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diges'tant. i. Aiding digestion, i. An agent which favors or assists the process of digestion.
  120. digitin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      digitin (dij'-il-in), (CDigitalis purpurea. Syn., crystallized digitalin.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      digitin (dij'it-in). An inert substance found in digitalis. Also used as a synonym for digitonin.
  121. dineric - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dineric (di-ner'ik) [G. dine, an eddy, whirlpool.) Eddying or whirling, noting the movement of a liquid, d. interspace, the surface between two liquid phases.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dineric (di-ner'ik) [Gr. Sunj a whirlpool]. Whirling like a whirlpool.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dineric (di-ner'ik) [G. dine, an eddy, whirlpool.) Eddying or whirling, noting the movement of a liquid, d. interspace, the surface between two liquid phases.
  122. dioptometry - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dioptometry (di op-tom'-et-re) [diopter; ukrpw, a measure]. The measurement of the accommodative and refractive states of the eye.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dioptom'etry. Dloptrometry.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dioptom'etry. Dloptrometry.
  123. dioscorein - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dioscorein (di-os-ko'-re-in) [Dioscorides, a Greek botanist]. A precipitate from a tincture of the root of Dioscorea villosa. It is antispasmodic, expectorant, and diaphoretic. Dose \ to 4 grains.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dioscorein (di-os-kor'e-in). A resinoid from Dioscorea villosa; a brownish bitter powder, employed as a diaphoretic and antispasmodic in doses of gr. 1-3 (0.06-0.3).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dioscorein (di-os-ko're-in). A resinous, dry concentration prepared from DioscorSo vitto'sa: diaphoretic, antispasmodic, and expectorant. Dose, 1-4 gr. (0.066-0.259 gm.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dioscorein (di-os-kor'e-in). A resinoid from Dioscorea villosa; a brownish bitter powder, employed as a diaphoretic and antispasmodic in doses of gr. 1-3 (0.06-0.3).
  124. diose - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diose (di'-os). A monosaccharide containing only two carbon atoms; it is the simplest form of sugar.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diose (di'6z). Glycol aldehyde, C,H4Oi, chemically the simplest sugar.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      diose (di'os). See biose.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      diose (di'5s). Glycollic aldehyde, CNjOH—COH. the simplest sugar.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diose (di'6z). Glycol aldehyde, C,H4Oi, chemically the simplest sugar.
  125. diosmosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diosmosis (di-os-mn'-sis). Same as osmosis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diosmosis (di-oz-mo'sis) [G. dia, through, + osmas, a pushing.] The transudation of a fluid through a membrane.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diosmosis (di-oz-mo'sis) [G. dia, through, + osmas, a pushing.] The transudation of a fluid through a membrane.
  126. diphtherial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diphtherial (dif-lhe'-re-al). Pertaining to diphtheria.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diphthe'rial. Relating to diphtheria.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      diphtherial (dif-the're-al). Pertaining to diphtheria.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diphthe'rial. Relating to diphtheria.
  127. diphtheritic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diphtheritic (dif-ther-it'-ik) {diphtheria}. Of or pertaining to diphtheria.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diphtheritic. Relating in any way to diphtheria.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      diphtheritic (dif-ther-it'ik). Pertaining to diphtheria, d. sore throat. A euphemism for a mild form of diphtheria.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diphtheritic. Relating in any way to diphtheria.
  128. diphtheritis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diphtheritis (dif-ther-i'-tis). See diphtheria.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      diphtheritis (dif-the-ri'tis). Bretonneau's name for diphtheria.
  129. diphtheroid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diphtheroid (dif'-ther-oid) [diphtheria]. i. Resembling diphtheria, a. A general term for all pseudomembranous formations not due to bociUtu diphtheria.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diph'theroid [G. eidos, resemblance.] Pseudodiphtheria, false diphtheria; one of a group of local infections, suggesting diphtheria, with occasional symptoms of toxemia, caused by various microorganisms other than the diphtheria bacillus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      diphtheroid (difther-oid). i. Resembling diphtheria, i. A disease resembling diphtheria, but not due to Loffler's bacillus. 3. A bacillus belonging to the diphtheria group.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diph'theroid [G. eidos, resemblance.] Pseudodiphtheria, false diphtheria; one of a group of local infections, suggesting diphtheria, with occasional symptoms of toxemia, caused by various microorganisms other than the diphtheria bacillus.
  130. diphyodont - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diphyodont (difl-o-dont) [G di-, two, + phyo, I produce, + odous(odont-), tooth.] Having two sets of teeth, as man and most mammals.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      diphyodont (dif'e-o-dont) [Gr. 4i- two + to produce + iioin toothj. Having two sets of teeth.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diphyodont (difl-o-dont) [G di-, two, + phyo, I produce, + odous(odont-), tooth.] Having two sets of teeth, as man and most mammals.
  131. diploblastic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diploblastic (dip-lo-blas'-tik) [diplo-; JSXairrif, a germ]. Having two germinal layers.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diploblas'tic [G. diplous, double, + blastos, germ.] Formed of two germ layers.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      diploblastic (dip-lo-blas'tik) [Gr. iiirXAot double + jSXaorfe germ]. Made up of two germlayers.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diploblas'tic [G. diplous, double, + blastos, germ.] Formed of two germ layers.
  132. diplococcus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diplococcus (dip-lo-kok'-us) [diplo-; uSatot, a berry]. A micrococcus that occurs in groups of two. See Micrococci, table of,
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      diplococcus (dip-lo-kok'kus). A micrococcus or spherical organism joined in sets of two or pairs. D. gonorrhea. Syn.: gonococcus. The organism producing gonorrhea. D. lntraeelluluris. Found in blood and pus in cerebrospinal meningitis. D. pneumoniae. A species found in the exudation and sputum, and also in the pleuritic and pericardial effusions in croupous pneumonia. [Gr., diploos, double, + kokkos, a berry, a kernel.]
  133. diploetic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diploetic (dip-lo-el'-ik) [diploe]. Relating to the diploe; diploic.
  134. diploic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diploic (dip-lo'-ik) [diploe}. See diploetic.
  135. diploneural - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diploneural (dip-lo-nu'-ral) [diplo-; >, nerve). Pertaining to a muscle, or other structure, supplied by the nerves.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      diploneural (dip-lo-nu'ral) [Gr. JurXAo? double + vtvpov nerve]. Having a double nerve-supply.
  136. dipsetic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dipsetic (dip-sft'-ik) (St^rucAs, causing thirst]. Causing or attended with thirst.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dipsetic (dip-set'ik). Producing thirst.
  137. dipsopathy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dipsopathy (dip-sop'-ath-e) [Stya, thirst; T06ot, disease]. The thirst-cure; the treatment of disease by limiting the liquids ingested.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dipsopathy (dip-sop'ath-e) [Gr. iWa thirst + if lift >< disease). The nervous condition characterized by dipsomania.
  138. dipsosis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dipsosis (dip-.in'-sis). See dipsesis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dipso'sis [G. dipsa, thirst.] Excessive thirst, or a longing for certain unusual forms of drink.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dipsosis (dip-so'sis) [Gr. aJ^o thirst). Morbid thirst.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dipso'sis [G. dipsa, thirst.] Excessive thirst, or a longing for certain unusual forms of drink.
  139. dirt-eating - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dirt-eating. Geophagia, geophagism, geophagy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dirt-eating. See geophagism.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dirt-eating. Geophagia, geophagism, geophagy.
  140. disassimilation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      disassimilation (dis-as-sim-il-a'-shun). The process of transformation of assimilated substances into waste-products. Failure or loss of assimilative power.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      disassimila'tion. Destructive or retrograde metabolism.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      disassimilation (dis"as-im-il-a'shun) \ilis- + assimilation]. The reverse of assimilation; the process by which a substance is changed into waste matter and cast out.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      disassimila'tion. Destructive or retrograde metabolism.
  141. discission - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      discission (dis-ish'-un) [discissio; discindere, to tear or cut apart], i. An operation for soft cataract in which the capsule is lacerated a number of times to allow the lens-substance to be absorbed. 2. See RansohoJTs operation,
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      discission (dis-sish-un) [L. discindere, to split.] Incision or cutting through a part; specifically needling, splitting the capsule and breaking up the substance of the crystalline lens with a knife-needle, in cases of soft cataract, d. of the cer'vix, division of the cervix uteri on either side for the relief of stenosis, d. of the pleu'rt, Ransohoff's operation, poste'rior d., incision of a membranous cataract from behind by a knife passed through the sclera.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      discission (dis-sish'un). A cutting or tearing apart, cataract d. An operation for cataract consisting in incising the anterior capsule of the lens in one or more directions by means of a needle with cutting edges, inserted through the cornea or through the sclera, without depressing or disturbing the lens. [Lat., discindere, to cut or tear apart.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      discission (di-sizh'un) [L. discis'sio; dis- apart + sein'dere to cut). A cutting in twain, or division, as of a soft cataract, d. of cervix uteri, excision of wedge-shaped pieces from each side of the cervix uteri for the relief of stenosis of the cervix. d. of pleura, cruciform sections into the pleura for empyema. posterior d., intision of the capsule of a cataract from behind.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      discission (dis-sish-un) [L. discindere, to split.] Incision or cutting through a part; specifically needling, splitting the capsule and breaking up the substance of the crystalline lens with a knife-needle, in cases of soft cataract, d. of the cer'vix, division of the cervix uteri on either side for the relief of stenosis, d. of the pleu'rt, Ransohoff's operation, poste'rior d., incision of a membranous cataract from behind by a knife passed through the sclera.
  142. discitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      discitis (dis-k^'(ke')tis). Inflammation of any disc, especially of an interarticular cartilage; meniscitis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      discitis (dis-ki'tis). Inflammation of a disk, particularly of an interarticular cartilage.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      discitis (dis-k^'(ke')tis). Inflammation of any disc, especially of an interarticular cartilage; meniscitis.
  143. discoblastic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      discoblastic (dis-ko-blas'-tik) [disc; 0\aar6t, a germ]. Undergoing discoid segmentation of the vitellus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      discoblas'tic. Relating to a discoidal segmentation of the yolk in an impregnated ovum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      discobla'stic (dis-ko-blas'tik) [Gr. Siatm disk + /A<i.;i.<\ germ]. Undergoing a discoid vitelline segmentation.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      discoblas'tic. Relating to a discoidal segmentation of the yolk in an impregnated ovum.
  144. discussive - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      discussive (dis-kus'iv). Same as discutiertt.
  145. discutient - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      discutient (dis-ku'she-ent) [L. discu'lere to dissipate). Scattering; causing a disappearance; also a remedy which so acts.
  146. disdiaclast - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      disdiaclast (dis-di'-ak-las?) [Sit, double; 3i6, through; «Xar, to break]. One of the small, doubly refractive elements in the contractile disca of a muscle-fiber. ^
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      disdiaclast (dis-di'ak-last) [Gr. «s twice + «iaicXa» to break through). Any one of the doubly refracting elements of the contractile substance of muscle.
  147. disodic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      disodic (di-s(/-dik) [di, two; sodium], i. Containing two atoms of sodium in the molecule. 2. (disod'-ik) [6lt, twice; &A4f, a way.] Furnished with or relating to two openings.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      disodic (di-so'dik). Containing two atoms of sodium in the molecule. [Lat., disodieus, from Gr., dis, twice, + Lat., sodium.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      disodic (di-so'dik). Having two atoms of sodium in each molecule.
  148. dispensatory - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dispensatory (dis-pens'-at-or-e). A treatise on mnteria medica and the composition, effects, and preparation of medicines.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      dispensatory (dis-pen'sa-tory). A commentary upon the pharmacopeal and unofficial drugs.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dispensatory (dis-pen'sa-to-re) [L. dispmsato'rinm\. A treatise on the qualities and composition of medicines.
  149. dissepiment - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dissepiment (dis-ep'-e-meni) [dis. apart; sttpire, to hedge in!- A partition, septum, or diaphragm.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dissep'iment [L. dis-, apart, + sepire. to fence.] Partition.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dissepiment (dis-sep'im-ent). Partition; separation.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dissep'iment [L. dis-, apart, + sepire. to fence.] Partition.
  150. distichia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      distichia (dis-tik'-e-ah). See distichiasis.
  151. distobuccal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      distobucc'al. Relating to the distal and buccal surfaces of a tooth, noting the angle formed by their junction.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      distobucc'al. Relating to the distal and buccal surfaces of a tooth, noting the angle formed by their junction.
  152. distolingual - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      distolingual (dis-lo-liit'-guml) [distare, to separate; lingua, tongue]. Relating to the portions of teeth between their distal and lingual walls.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      distolingual (dis-to-ling'gwal). Relating to the distal and lingual surfaces of a tooth, noting the angle formed by their junction.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      distolingual (dis-to-ling/gwal). Distal and lingual; denoting the portion of a tooth between its distal and lingual surfaces.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      distolingual (dis-to-ling'gwal). Relating to the distal and lingual surfaces of a tooth, noting the angle formed by their junction.
  153. distomiasis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      distomiasis (dis-to-mi'-as-is) [distoma]. The presence in the body of distoma.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      distomiasis (dis-to-mi'as-is). The condition produced by the presence of distoma in the body, pulmonary d., infection with the lungfluke, Paragonimus westermanii. distor'tor o'ris. The zygomaticus minor muscle, distraction(dis-trak'shun)[L. dis- apart + Irac'lio a drawing]. Traction so exerted as to separate surfaces normally opposed.
  154. distrix - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      distrix (dis-'triks) [tit, two; »pl(. hair). The splitting of the distal ends of the hair.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dis'trix [G. dis, twice, + thrix, hair.] An affection marked by the splitting of the hairs at their ends.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      distrix (dis'triks) [Gr. Us double + 6pll hair]. The splitting of the hairs at their distal ends.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dis'trix [G. dis, twice, + thrix, hair.] An affection marked by the splitting of the hairs at their ends.
  155. disulphate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      disulphate (di-sul'-fal) [di-; sulphur], A sulphate containing one atom of hydrogen that can be replaced by a base; an acid sulphate.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      disulphate (di-sul'fat). Acid sulphate, a salt of sulphuric acid in which there is an atom of hydrogen replaceable by a base.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      disulphate (di-sul'fat). A sulphate having a replaceable hydrogen atom.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      disulphate (di-sul'fat). Acid sulphate, a salt of sulphuric acid in which there is an atom of hydrogen replaceable by a base.
  156. diuretin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diuretin (di-u-re'-tin). ... C«H«OHCOONa. Theobromin sodiosalicylate. It has been used as a diuretic in pleuritic effusion and cardiac dropsy. Dose 90 gr. (6 Gm.) daily in four doses.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      diuret'in. Theobrominse sodio-salicylas (U.S.).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      diuret'in. Theobrominse sodio-salicylas (U.S.).
  157. diverticular - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      diverticular >,li .cr-tik'-u-lar) [diverliculum]. Relating to or arising from a diverticulum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      divertic'ular. Relating to a diverticulum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      divertic'ular. Relating to a diverticulum.
  158. divi-divi - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      divi-divi (div-e-dnf-e) [S. A.). The seed-pods of Casalpinia coriaria, a tree of South America.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      divi-divi (div-e-div'e). The pods of Casalpinia, plants of South America. They contain tannin and arc used as astringents.
  159. divulse - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      divulse' [L. diwlsus; diveUrrt, to pull apart.] To tear away or apart.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      divulse (di-vuls'). To pull apart forcibly.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      divulse' [L. diwlsus; diveUrrt, to pull apart.] To tear away or apart.
  160. docimasia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      docimasia (dos-im-o'-se-ah) [3oK(^i&r«tr, to examine). Examination; testing or assaying.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      docimasia (dos-im-a'ze-ah) [Or. SoKift&ftiv to examine). An assay or examination; an official test. pulmonary d., determination as to whether air has entered the lungs of a dead infant, as an indication whether it was born dead or alive.
  161. dolichocephalous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dolichocephalous (dol-I-ko-sef'al-us) Dolichocephalic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dolichocephalous (dol-I-ko-sef'al-us) Dolichocephalic.
  162. domatophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      domatophobia (do-mat-o-fo1-be-ah) |5wfia, house; -,-•-;>•;. fear]. Insane dread of being m a house; a variety of claustrophobia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      domatophobia (do-ma-to-fo'bl-ah) [G. ddma, house, + phobos, fear.] A morbid fear of being in a house; a form of claustrophobia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      domatophobia (do"mat-o-fo'be-ah) [Gr. . Sana. house 4- fear]. Insane dread of being in a house.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      domatophobia (do-ma-to-fo'bl-ah) [G. ddma, house, + phobos, fear.] A morbid fear of being in a house; a form of claustrophobia.
  163. dorsiflexion - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dorsiflexion (dor-se-flek'-shun) \dorsi-; flectere, to bend). A flexion, as of toes, toward the back.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dorsiflexion (dor-si-flek'shun). Bending toward the back; noting flexion of the foot, the dorsum approaching the leg, which, by analogy with the hand, would be called extension.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dorsiflexion (dor-si-flek'shun). Bending toward the back; noting flexion of the foot, the dorsum approaching the leg, which, by analogy with the hand, would be called extension.
  164. dourine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dourine (doo'-ren). A contagious venereal disease of horses, the prominent signs and symptoms consisting in inflammation of the genital organs and lymph glands, and paralysis of the hind legs. The exciting cause Is believed to be the Trypanosoma equiperdum. Syn.: Malde co'il.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dourine (doo'ren) [Fr.] Mai de coit; a trypanosomiasis of horses, conveyed by the sexual act; it is caused by Trypanosoma equiperdum, and is characterized by inflammation of the genitals, glandular swelling, and paralysis of the hind quarters.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dourine (doo-rfn'). A contagious disease of horses, characterized by swelling of lymph-glands, genital inflammation, and paralysis of hind limbs. It is caused by Trypanosffma eyuiper'dum. It is spread by sexual contact and is called also mal dt coil.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dourine (doo'ren) [Fr.] Mai de coit; a trypanosomiasis of horses, conveyed by the sexual act; it is caused by Trypanosoma equiperdum, and is characterized by inflammation of the genitals, glandular swelling, and paralysis of the hind quarters.
  165. dracontiasis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dracontiasis (dra-kon-ti'-as-is) [dracunculus]. The skin disease caused by dracunculus medinensis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dracontiasis (dra-kon-ti'a-sis). Infestation with the guinea-worm.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dracontiasis (drak-on-ti'as-is) [Gr. opaubvruiv (little dragon) tapeworm]. The diseased state produced by the presence of Fila'ria (Dracuriculus) mtdinen'sis.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dracontiasis (dra-kon-ti'a-sis). Infestation with the guinea-worm.
  166. dracontium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dracontium (dra-kon*-she-urn) (tpaxw, a dragon]. Skunk-cabbage.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dracontium (dra-kon'-shyum) [G. drakdn, dragon.] Skunk-cabbage, stinking hellebore, collard; the rhizome and roots of Spathyema ftztida (Symplocarpus fcetidus, Dracontium fatidum), a common plant in the swamps of North America; said to be a sialogogue, antispasmodic, and narcotic, in doses of gr. 10-20 (0.6-1.3).
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dracontium (dra-kon'-shyum) [G. drakdn, dragon.] Skunk-cabbage, stinking hellebore, collard; the rhizome and roots of Spathyema ftztida (Symplocarpus fcetidus, Dracontium fatidum), a common plant in the swamps of North America; said to be a sialogogue, antispasmodic, and narcotic, in doses of gr. 10-20 (0.6-1.3).
  167. dragee - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dragee (drah-zhd') [Fr.]. A sugar-coated pill, bolus, or comfit; a sugared confection.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dragee (dra-zha') [Fr.] A sugar-coated pill or capsule.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      dragee (drah'ja). A small pill, usually sugar-coated. [Fr.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dragee (dra'zhaK A sugar-coated pill or medicated confection.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dragee (dra-zha') [Fr.] A sugar-coated pill or capsule.
  168. dramatism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dramatism (dram'-at-izm) [drama]. Insanely stilted and lofty speech or behavior.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dramatism (dram'at-izm). Pompous and dramatic speech and behavior in insanity.
  169. dromograph - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dromograph (drom'-o-graf) [Spopai, A course; •*.!•«•!to write]. An instrument for registering the velocity of the blood-current.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dro'mograph [G. dromos, a running, + graphs, I record.] An instrument for recording the rapidity of the blood circulation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dromograph (drom'o-graf) [Gr. <p6juos running + -j pdv'tu' to record]. A recording hemodromometer.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dro'mograph [G. dromos, a running, + graphs, I record.] An instrument for recording the rapidity of the blood circulation.
  170. duboisine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      duboisine (du-bois'-ln), CnHnNOj. An alkaloid from Duboi^ia myoporoidcs. a tall shrub of Australia identical with hyoscyamine. It is used as a mydriatic; also as a hypnotic and sedative in epilepsy. Dose A-A &• (0.0008-0.002 Gm.). Antidotes: emetics, pilocarpine, muscarine. d. hydrobromide, dose and uses the same as duboisine. d. hydrochloride, usage and dose as duboisine. d. salicylate, used as a inviIii.uic in 0.2 to 0.8 % solution, d. sulphate, used as a mydriatic in aqueous solution—rV St. to I oz. of water (0.005 Gm. to 30 Cc.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      duboisine (du-boy'sen). An alkaloid obtained from duboisea. The sulphate is the salt usually employed as a hypnotic and in the treatment of paralysis agitans in doses of gr. u*u~iff (0.00080.0015); it is also used as a mydriatic.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      duboisine (du-boy'sen). An alkaloid obtained from duboisea. The sulphate is the salt usually employed as a hypnotic and in the treatment of paralysis agitans in doses of gr. u*u~iff (0.00080.0015); it is also used as a mydriatic.
  171. ductule - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ductule (duk'-tul) [duilulus. a small duct]. A small duct.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ductule (dukt'ul). Any minute duct; also that part or branch of a duct which is nearest the alveolus of a gland.
  172. dulcamara - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dulcamara (ditl-kam-a'-ra) [dulcis, sweet; amarus, bitter]. Bittersweet. The young branches of Solanum dulcamara, containing an alkaloid, solanine. In overdoses it causes nausea, emesis, and convulsive muscular movements, and in toxic doses it is a narcotic poison. It is employed in psoriasis and similar skin diseases. Dose of the fiuidextract 30 min.-i dr. (2-4 Cc.).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dulcamara (dul"kah-mah'rah) [L. dulcis, sweet, + amarus, bitter. ] (N.F.) Bittersweet, poisonberry, wolf-grape; the dried young branches of Solanum dulcamara, a climbing plant of the north temperate zone; diuretic, diaphoretic, sedative, and narcotic in doses of 3}~i (2.0-4.0) or 31 (4.0) of the fluidextract.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      dulcamara (dul-kam'ar-ah). Bittersweet (Solanum d.)', its young branches were formerly used medicinally. List of poisons and their antidotes, see in appendix, page 938. [Lat., dulcis, sweet, -famarus, bitter.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dulcamara (dul"kah-mah'rah) [L. dulcis, sweet, + amarus, bitter. ] (N.F.) Bittersweet, poisonberry, wolf-grape; the dried young branches of Solanum dulcamara, a climbing plant of the north temperate zone; diuretic, diaphoretic, sedative, and narcotic in doses of 3}~i (2.0-4.0) or 31 (4.0) of the fluidextract.
  173. dulcin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dul'cin. i. Dulcite. 2. Sucrol.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      dul'cin. See dulcite.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dulcin (dul'sin) [L. dut'cis sweet]. Same as sucrol.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dul'cin. i. Dulcite. 2. Sucrol.
  174. dumminess - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dumminess (dum'I-nes). Mental dulness and apathy occurring as a sequel of acute encephalitis in the horse.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dumminess (dum'e-nes). A dull, apathetic condition seen in horses after acute inflammation of the brain.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dumminess (dum'I-nes). Mental dulness and apathy occurring as a sequel of acute encephalitis in the horse.
  175. duodenostomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      duodenostomy (du-od-en-os'-to-me) [duodeno-; ffr6ua. a mouth]. The operation of forming an openir" into the duodenum through the abdominal walls.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      duodenos'tomy [L. duodenum + G. stoma, mouth.] The operative establishment of a fistula into the duodenum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      duodenos'tomy [L. duodenum + G. stoma, mouth.] The operative establishment of a fistula into the duodenum.
  176. duplicitas - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      duplicitas (du-plisl-tas) [L.] Duplicity, d. ante'rior, a monstrosity with duplication of the head and upper part of the body. d. poste'rior, a monstrosity with duplication of the pelvic extremity.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      duplicitas (du-plis'it-as) [L.]. A doubling; a monstrosity in which either the cephalic or pelvic end is doubled, d. ante'rior, the doubling of the cephalic portion of a monster-fetus, d. poste'rior, the doubling of a monster-fetus in the pelvic region.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      duplicitas (du-plisl-tas) [L.] Duplicity, d. ante'rior, a monstrosity with duplication of the head and upper part of the body. d. poste'rior, a monstrosity with duplication of the pelvic extremity.
  177. dynamization - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dynamization (di-nam-iz-a'-shun) [ouvamt, power]. The so-called potcnlizing of medicines by comminution and agitation.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dynamization (di-nam-i-za'shun). In homeopathy, the increase of potency of a medicine by trituration or by dilution in water with succussion; see potency (3).
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      dynamization (di-nam-i-za'shun). The process of endowing with force; of the homeopathists, the increase of medicinal power with which, as they profess, a substance may be endowed by comminution, agitation, etc.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dynamization (cli"nam-iz-a'shun). The hypothetic increase of medicinal effectiveness by dilution and trituration.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dynamization (di-nam-i-za'shun). In homeopathy, the increase of potency of a medicine by trituration or by dilution in water with succussion; see potency (3).
  178. dynamogen - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dynamogen (di-nam'o-jen). A proprietary substance resembling hematogen: used in anemia and chlorosis.
  179. dynamograph - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dynamograph (di-nam'-o-graf) [dynamo; -fp&fciv. to write]. An instrument designed to measure and record graphically muscular strength.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dynam'ograph [G. dynamis, force, + grapho, I write.] An instrument for recording the degree of muscular power.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      dynamograph (di-nam'o-graf). An instrument for recording muscular contractions. [Gr., dynamis, power, + graphein, to write.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dynamograph (di-nam'o-graf) [Gr. .Vra/m power -f- •Ypa.iptu' to write). A self-registering dynamometer.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dynam'ograph [G. dynamis, force, + grapho, I write.] An instrument for recording the degree of muscular power.
  180. dynamoscope - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dynamoscope (di-nam'-o-skop} [dynamo; <r«oxi, form; &&ot, fear]. Morbid dread of deformity; it is a rudimentary form of paranoia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dysmorphophobia (dis-mor-fo-fo'bl-ah) [G dys-, bad, + morphl, form, -I- fhobos, fear.] An insane fear or dread of deformity.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dysmorphophobia (dis-mor-fo-fo'bl-ah) [G dys-, bad, + morphl, form, -I- fhobos, fear.] An insane fear or dread of deformity.
  181. dysodontiasis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dysodontiasis (dis-o-don-ti'-as-is} [dys-; Mocrfaim, dentition]. Difficult dentition.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dysodontiasis (dis-o-don-ti'a-sis) [G. dys-, difficult, bad, + odous(odont-), tooth.] Difficulty or irregularity in the eruption of the teeth.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dysodontiasis (dis-o-don-ti'a-sis) [G. dys-, difficult, bad, + odous(odont-), tooth.] Difficulty or irregularity in the eruption of the teeth.
  182. dysorexia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dysorexia (dis-or-eks1-t-ah) [dys-; &pe£u, appetite]. A depraved or unnatural appetite.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dysorexia (dis-o-rek'sl-ah) [G. dys-. bad, + orexis, appetite.] Diminished or perverted appetite.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dysorexia (dis-o-rek'se-ah) [Gr. Svt- bad opf£is appetite). Impaired or deranged appetite.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dysorexia (dis-o-rek'sl-ah) [G. dys-. bad, + orexis, appetite.] Diminished or perverted appetite.
  183. dyssynergia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      dyssynergia (dis-sin-ur'jl-ah) [G. dys-, difficult, + syn, with, + ergon, work.] A failure to work in unison or harmony, ataxia. d. cerebelltrls progressi'va, Hunt's syndrome (i).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      dyssynergia (dis-sin-er'je-ah) [Gr. Sin- ill + aw together + tpyov work]. Disturbance of muscular coordination, d. cerebella'ris progres'siva, a condition marked by generalized tremors associated with disturbance of muscle-tone and of muscular coordination; due to disorder of cerebellar function.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      dyssynergia (dis-sin-ur'jl-ah) [G. dys-, difficult, + syn, with, + ergon, work.] A failure to work in unison or harmony, ataxia. d. cerebelltrls progressi'va, Hunt's syndrome (i).
  184. dysuric - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      dysuric (dis-H'-rik) [dysuria]. Affected with or relating to dysuria.