User:Visviva/Medical/By links/R

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  1. rabiate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rabiate (ra'-bf-ul) [rabies, rage] Rabid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rabiate (ra'be-at). Affected with rabies.
  2. rabiator - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rabiator (ra'be-a-tor). A person or animal affected with rabies.
  3. rabic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rabic (ro&'-ifc) [rabies]. Pertaining to rabies, as rabic virus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rab'ic. Rabid.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rabic (ra'bik). Pertaining to rabies.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rab'ic. Rabid.
  4. rabietic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rabietic (ra-be-et'-ik) [rabies, rage). Pertaining to affected with, or of the nature of, rabies.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rabietic (ra-be-et'ik). Pertaining to or affected with rabies.
  5. rachial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rachial (ra'ke-al). Rachidial.
  6. raclage - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      raclage (rak-lahzj') [Fr.]. The destruction of a soft growth by rubbing, as with a brush or harsh sponge; grattage.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      raclage (rS-klazh') [Fr.] Curettage, scraping.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      raclage (rS-klazh') [Fr.] Curettage, scraping.
  7. radal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      radal (ra'-dal). A 20 % solution of protargol; used as a prophylactic in gonorrhea.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      radal (ra'dal). A 30 per cent, solution of protargol: used as a prophylactic for gonorrhea.
  8. radicular - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      radicular (rad-ik'-u-lar). Pertaining to a root or to a radicle; specifically, pertaining to the roots of the spinal nerves, r. arteries, arteries which accompany ne»ve roots into the spinal cord.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      radic'ular. Relating to a radicle.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      radicular (rad-ik'u-lar). Pertaining to a radicle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      radicular (rad-ik'u-lar). Of or pertaining to a radicle or root.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      radic'ular. Relating to a radicle.
  9. radiculitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      radiculitis (rad-ik-u-li'-tis) [radicula; Itu. inflammation). Inflammation of a nerve root.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      radiculitis (ra-dik-u-li'(le')tis) [L. radicula, radicle + G. -itis.] Inflammation of a spinal nerve-root.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      radiculitis (rad-ik-u-li'tis) [L. radic'ula a little root + Gr. -irw inflammation]. Inflammation of the spinal nerve-roots.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      radiculitis (ra-dik-u-li'(le')tis) [L. radicula, radicle + G. -itis.] Inflammation of a spinal nerve-root.
  10. radio-actinium - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      radio-actinium (ra"di:o-ak-tin'e-um). A substance formed by the disintegration of actinium. It gives off alpha and beta rays and disintegrates into actinium x.
  11. radiobe - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      radiobe (ra'-de-6b) [radius, a ray; ptat, life]. A peculiar, microscopic, radium formation, thought to be intermediate between a crystal and a living microorganism.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ra'diobe [L. radius, ray, + G. bios, life.] A peculiar formation, possibly a crystal, formed in gelatin submitted to the action of radium, thought by J. B. Burke to be a transition form between a crystal and a living microbe.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      radiobe (ra'de-Ob) [L. ra'dius ray + Gr. 0los life]. One of the peculiar microscopic condensations of sterilized bouillon produced by radium, discovered by J. B. Burke, which, by their appearance and the way in which they divide, have suggested the similar phenomena of bacteria.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ra'diobe [L. radius, ray, + G. bios, life.] A peculiar formation, possibly a crystal, formed in gelatin submitted to the action of radium, thought by J. B. Burke to be a transition form between a crystal and a living microbe.
  12. radioscope - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      radioscope (ra'de-o-skop) [L. ra'dius ray + Gr. aicoffiv to view]. An instrument for detecting or studying x-rays.
  13. radiotherapeutics - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      radiotherapeutics (ra-de-o-ther-ap-ur-tiks). See radiotherapy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      radiotherapeutics (ra"de-o-ther-ap-u'tiks). Radiotherapy.
  14. ramex - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ramex (ra'-meks) [gen., ramicis: pi., ramices], A hernia, or hemial or scrotal tumor, r. varicosus. variococele.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ra'mex [L.] Hernia, varicocele, or any scrota! tumor.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      ramex (ra'meks). A hernia. [Lat.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ra'mex [L.] Hernia, varicocele, or any scrota! tumor.
  15. ramulus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ramulus (ramf-u-lus) [L.: /-/.. ramuli], A small branch, or ramus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ram'ulus [L. dim. of ramus, a branch.] A small branch or twig; one of the terminal divisions of a ramus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ramulus (ram'u-lus). A small branch or terminal division.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ram'ulus [L. dim. of ramus, a branch.] A small branch or twig; one of the terminal divisions of a ramus.
  16. ranular - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ran'ular. Relating to a ranula.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ranular (ran'u-lar). Pertaining to or of the nature of ranula.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ran'ular. Relating to a ranula.
  17. rasceta - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rasceta (ras-e'-tah) [L.]. The transverse lines or creases on the inner side of the wrist,
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rasce'ta. The transverse wrinkling on the volar surface of the wrist.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rasce'ta. The transverse wrinkling on the volar surface of the wrist.
  18. rasion - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rasion (ra'-zjun) [radere, to scrape]. The scraping of drugs with a file.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rasion (ra'zhun) [L. radere, to scrape.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rasion (ra'zhun) [L. radere, to scrape.]
  19. raspatory - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      raspatory (ras'-pa-to-re) [raspatorium, from radere, to scrape]. A rasp or file for trirfiming the rough surfaces of bones or for removing the periosteum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ras'patory. An instrument used for scraping a bone.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      raspatory (ras'pa-to-re). An instrument for scraping, especially for detaching the periosteum from bone. [Lat., raspatorium.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      raspatory (ras'pat-o-re) [L. raspah/rium]. A file or rasp for surgeon's use; a xyster.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ras'patory. An instrument used for scraping a bone.
  20. reagin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      re'agin. i. WoIff-EUner's term for antibody. 2. Neisser's term for a substance elaborated by the spirochetes of syphilis and yaws, having the property of uniting with lipoids, and of fixing complement.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      re'agin. i. WoIff-EUner's term for antibody. 2. Neisser's term for a substance elaborated by the spirochetes of syphilis and yaws, having the property of uniting with lipoids, and of fixing complement.
  21. recessus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      reces'sus (re-ses'sut) [L.] A recess or small hollow. r. nnte'rior [BNA], a circumscribed deepening oi the interpeduncular fossa in the direction of the corpora mamillaria. r. cochlea'ris [BXA'n cochlear recess, a depression on the inner wall of the vestibule of the labyrinth, between the two limbs into which the crista vestibnli divides posteriorly; it is perforated by foramina giving passage to nerves supplying the posterior portion of the ductus cochlearis. r. duod'enojejuna'lis [BNA]. a pocket between the duodenojejunal and the duodenomesocolk folds to the left of the spinal column, r. ellip'ticus [BNA], elliptical recess, fovea hemielliptica. an oval depression in the roof and inner wall of the vestibule of the labyrinth, lodging the utriculus. r. epitympan'icus [BNA], epitympanic recess, tympanic attic; the upper portion of the tympanic cavity above the membrana tympani; it contains the head of the malleus and the body of the incus, r. ethmolacrima lis, a canty between the anterior portion of the ethmoid bone and the orbit, r. ileocaca'lis infe'rior [BNA]> a deep fossa sometimes found between the ileocecal fold, the appendical mesenterioluro. and the cecum. r. ileocieca'lis supe'rior (BNA), a shallow pouch occasionally existing between theileum. the cecum. and the ileocolic artery when the latter is present, r. infe'rior omenta'lis [BNA]. a process of the omental bursa extending into the great omentum in the embryo, t. infundib u!i [BNA]. recess of the infundibulum. a funnelshaped diverticulum leading down from the anterior portion of the third ventricle of the brain through the tuber cinereum into theinfondibulum of the hypophysis (pituitary body), r. infundibulifor'mis, r. pharynegus [BNA]. r. intersigmoid'eus [BNA], a shallow funnelshaped pocket extending downward and to the left at the root of the sigmoid mesocolon. r. membra'nte tym'pani nnte'rior [BNA]. a slitlike space on the tympanic wall between the anterior malleolar fold and the drum membrane. r. membra'nae tym'pani poste'rior [BNA]. a narrow pocket in the wall of the tympanum between the posterior malleolar fold and the drum membrane. r. membra'nje tym'pui supe'rior [BNA]. a space in the mucous membrane on the inner surface of the drum membrane between the membrana flaccida and the neck of the malleus, r. op'tic us [BNA]. optic recess, a pit or diverticulum extending forward from the anterior part of the third ventricle of the brain above the optic chiasm. r. paracol icus [BNA], one of several pockets occasionally present at the left margin of the descending mesocolon. r. parotide'us, a deep hollow on the side of the head below and in front of the mastoid; it lodges the parotid gland, r. pharynge'us [BNA). r. infundibuliformis. Rosenmuller's recess or fossa, a slitlike depression in the pharynpeal wall behind the opening of the Eustachian tube. r. pineal:' [BNA], pineal recess, a diverticulum from the posterior part of the third ventricle of the brain passing back above the posterior commissure
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      recessus (re-ses'us). See recess. r. cochlearls. A slight depression between the two diverging ridges into which the crista vestibuli divides, r. eonuril. A small cavity at the base of the pineal gland, included between the lamina conarii and lamina pedunculorum. r. hcmIclllptlcns. An oval depression in the roof of the wall of the vestibule behind the crista vestibuli. r. hcmisphcrlcus. A small roundish depression in the inner wall of the vestibule of the ear, in front of the crista vestibuli, perforated for the transmission of branches of the auditory nerve, r. Infundibuli. The depression in the floor of the third ventricle which forms the cavity of the infundibulum. r. intercruralls. The interpeduncular space, r. labyrinthl. A fetal structure corresponding to the aqueduct of the vestibule of the car. See fossula sulciformis. r. nasopalatlnus. The nasal opening of the nasopalatine canal. r. m-clpltulis. The posterior horn of the lateral ventricle, r. perltonet. The pouchlike processes formed by the peritoneum. r. pharyngcus. A blind pouchlike process of the mucous membrane of the pharynx below the opening of the eustachian tul>e.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      recessus (re-ses'us). Latin for cavity or recta. r. ante'rior [B N A], a passage from the fenestra rotunda leading to the scala tympani. r. cot ug ni, r. cotun'nii, a sac of the dura into which the ductus endolymphaticus leads, r. epitympan icus [B N A], the epitympanic recess, r, fastigii, a recess in the roof of the fourth ventricle, r. parieta'lis, a cavity of the coelom which develops into pleural and part of the peritoneal cavities, r. pharyn'geus [B N A], a fossa in the nasopharynx on each side of the eustachian tubes; Rosenmuller's fossa, r. poste'rior, a deep portion of the interpeduncular fossa toward the pons. r. preop ticus, a recess in front of the optic chiasm. r. supe'rior sac'ci omen ti. a fetal diverticulum between the vena cava and the intestinal canaL r. vestib'uli, a fold in the wall of the auditory vesicle which develops into the vestibule of the ear.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      reces'sus (re-ses'sut) [L.] A recess or small hollow. r. nnte'rior [BNA], a circumscribed deepening oi the interpeduncular fossa in the direction of the corpora mamillaria. r. cochlea'ris [BXA'n cochlear recess, a depression on the inner wall of the vestibule of the labyrinth, between the two limbs into which the crista vestibnli divides posteriorly; it is perforated by foramina giving passage to nerves supplying the posterior portion of the ductus cochlearis. r. duod'enojejuna'lis [BNA]. a pocket between the duodenojejunal and the duodenomesocolk folds to the left of the spinal column, r. ellip'ticus [BNA], elliptical recess, fovea hemielliptica. an oval depression in the roof and inner wall of the vestibule of the labyrinth, lodging the utriculus. r. epitympan'icus [BNA], epitympanic recess, tympanic attic; the upper portion of the tympanic cavity above the membrana tympani; it contains the head of the malleus and the body of the incus, r. ethmolacrima lis, a canty between the anterior portion of the ethmoid bone and the orbit, r. ileocaca'lis infe'rior [BNA]> a deep fossa sometimes found between the ileocecal fold, the appendical mesenterioluro. and the cecum. r. ileocieca'lis supe'rior (BNA), a shallow pouch occasionally existing between theileum. the cecum. and the ileocolic artery when the latter is present, r. infe'rior omenta'lis [BNA]. a process of the omental bursa extending into the great omentum in the embryo, t. infundib u!i [BNA]. recess of the infundibulum. a funnelshaped diverticulum leading down from the anterior portion of the third ventricle of the brain through the tuber cinereum into theinfondibulum of the hypophysis (pituitary body), r. infundibulifor'mis, r. pharynegus [BNA]. r. intersigmoid'eus [BNA], a shallow funnelshaped pocket extending downward and to the left at the root of the sigmoid mesocolon. r. membra'nte tym'pani nnte'rior [BNA]. a slitlike space on the tympanic wall between the anterior malleolar fold and the drum membrane. r. membra'nae tym'pani poste'rior [BNA]. a narrow pocket in the wall of the tympanum between the posterior malleolar fold and the drum membrane. r. membra'nje tym'pui supe'rior [BNA]. a space in the mucous membrane on the inner surface of the drum membrane between the membrana flaccida and the neck of the malleus, r. op'tic us [BNA]. optic recess, a pit or diverticulum extending forward from the anterior part of the third ventricle of the brain above the optic chiasm. r. paracol icus [BNA], one of several pockets occasionally present at the left margin of the descending mesocolon. r. parotide'us, a deep hollow on the side of the head below and in front of the mastoid; it lodges the parotid gland, r. pharynge'us [BNA). r. infundibuliformis. Rosenmuller's recess or fossa, a slitlike depression in the pharynpeal wall behind the opening of the Eustachian tube. r. pineal:' [BNA], pineal recess, a diverticulum from the posterior part of the third ventricle of the brain passing back above the posterior commissure
  22. recidivation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      recidivation (re-sid-i-va'shun) [L. recidivart; r*-, back, + coders, to fall.] Relapse of a disease or a symptom.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      recidivation (re-sid-i-va'shun) [L. recidivart; r*-, back, + coders, to fall.] Relapse of a disease or a symptom.
  23. recipiomotor - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      recipiomotor (re-sip-e-o-mo'-tor) [recipere, to receive; motor]. Receiving motor impulses.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      recipiomotor (re-sip"I-o-mo'tor). Relating to the reception of motor stimuli.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      recipiomotor (re-sip"e-o-mo'tor) [L. rctip'ere to receive -f- mo'tor mover]. Pertaining to the reception of motor impressions.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      recipiomotor (re-sip"I-o-mo'tor). Relating to the reception of motor stimuli.
  24. reclination - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      reclination (rek-lin-a'-shun) [reclinare, to recline], i. An old operation for cataract, called also "couching," in which the lens was pushed back into the vitreous chamber. 2. The act of lying down.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      reclination (re-kli-na'shun) [L. reclinare, to bend back.] Turning the cataractous lens over into the vitreous to remove it from the line of vision; distinguished from couching, in which the lens is simply depressed into the vitreous.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      reclination (rek-lin-a'shun) [L. redina'tio]. One of the operations for cataract: a turning of the lens over on its back.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      reclination (re-kli-na'shun) [L. reclinare, to bend back.] Turning the cataractous lens over into the vitreous to remove it from the line of vision; distinguished from couching, in which the lens is simply depressed into the vitreous.
  25. recrementitious - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      recrementitious (rek-re-mert-tish'-us) [recrement], Pertaining to or of the nature of a recrement.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      recrementitious (rek"re-men-tish'ua). Of the nature of a recrement.
  26. rectophobia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rectophobia. (rek-to-fo'-be-ak) \reclum: fear], i. A presentiment or sense of impending ill experienced by patients having rectal disease. 2. A morbid dread of rectal disease.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rectopho'bia. Proctophobia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rectophobia (rek-to-fo'be-ah) [rectum i Gr. if>6ftot fear]. A morbid foreboding peculiar to patients with rectal disease.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rectopho'bia. Proctophobia.
  27. rectoscopy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rectos'copy. Proctoscopy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rectoscopy (rek-tos ko-pe). Same as proctoscopy.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rectos'copy. Proctoscopy.
  28. recurvation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      recurvation (re-kur-m'-shun) [recunatus, curved back]. The act or process of recurbing or of bending backward.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      recurva'tion. A backward bending or flexure.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      recurvation (re-kur-va'shun) [L. recuno'tio\. A backward bending or curvature.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      recurva'tion. A backward bending or flexure.
  29. redressment - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      redress'ment. i. Correction of a deformity, put ting a part straight. 2. A renewed dressing of a wound.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      redressment (re-dres'ment) [Fr. redressement]. i. A second or repeated dressing. 2. Replacement of a part or correction of a deformity, r. force, forcible correction of a deformity; especially a procedure for the immediate correction of knock-knee.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      redress'ment. i. Correction of a deformity, put ting a part straight. 2. A renewed dressing of a wound.
  30. refractivity - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      refractivity (rc-frak-tiv'-it-e) [refract}. Power of refraction; ability to refract.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      refractivity (re-frak-tiv'it-e). The quality of being refractive; the power or ability to refract.
  31. refracture - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      refrac'ture. The breaking again of a bone which has united, after a previous. fracture, in a bad position.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      refracture (re-frak'chur). The operation of breaking over again a bone which has been fractured and has united with a deformity.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      refrac'ture. The breaking again of a bone which has united, after a previous. fracture, in a bad position.
  32. refrangibility - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      refrangibility (re-fran-jib-il'-it-e) [see refract]. Capability of undergoing refraction.
  33. refrangible - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      refrangible (re-fran'jl-bl) [L. nfrangm, to break back, + habilis, apt.] Capable of being refracted.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      refrangible (re-fran'jib-1). Susceptible of being refracted.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      refrangible (re-fran'jl-bl) [L. nfrangm, to break back, + habilis, apt.] Capable of being refracted.
  34. refringent - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      refringent (re-frin'-jent) [refringere, to break], See refractive.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      refrin'gent. Refractive.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      refringent (re-frin'jent) [L. refrin'gens]. Same as refractive.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      refrin'gent. Refractive.
  35. refusion - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      refusion (re-fu'-zjun) (refusio. an overflowing]. The act of withdrawing blood from the vessels, exposing it to the oxygen of the air, and passing it back again.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      refusion (re-fu'shun) [L. refu'sia]. The temporary removal and subsequent return of blood to the circulation.
  36. regurgitant - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      regurgitant (re-Kitr'-jit-ant). Flowing backward.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      regur'gitant. Regurgitating, flowing backward.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      regurgitant (re-gur'jit-ant) [L. re- back 4- gtirgita're to flood]. Flowing back or against the normal direction.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      regur'gitant. Regurgitating, flowing backward.
  37. reinoculation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      reinoculation (re-tn-ok-u-la'-skun) (re, again; inocular e, to inoculate]. Inoculation a second time with the same kind of virus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      re'inocula'tion. A reinfection by means of inoculation.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      re'inocula'tion. A reinfection by means of inoculation.
  38. reinversion - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      reinversion (re-in-ver'-shvn) [re, again -.invert]. The act of reducing an inverted uterus by the application of pressure to the fundus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      re'inver'sion. The correction, spontaneous or operative, of an inversion, as of the uterus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      reinversion (re-in-ver'shun). Restoration to its normal place of an inverted organ, especially restoration of an inverted uterus.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      re'inver'sion. The correction, spontaneous or operative, of an inversion, as of the uterus.
  39. rejuvenescence - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rejuvenescence (re-joo-ven-es'-ens) [re, again; juvenesceret to grow young]. A renewal of youth; a renewal of strength and vigor.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rejuvenescence (re-ju-ven-es'ens) [L. re-, again, + juvenescere, to grow young.] i. A renewal of youth; the return of a cell or tissue to a state in which it was in an earlier stage of existence. 2. In botany, the escape of the protoplasm of a cell and its conversion into a cell of a different character, as occurs in certain algae.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      rejuvenescence (re-ju-ven-es'ens). i. The renewal of youth; the property possessed by a protoplasmic cell of undergoing a rearrangement of its parts and taking on renewed activity. 2. Of Strasburger ('875), the complete development of cells. 3. The exhibition by cells of renewed activity in binary division, instead of their breaking up into spores after conjugation. [Lat., rejuvenescentia.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rejuvenescence (re"ju-ven-es'ens) [L. re- again + jumtcs'cere to become young). A renewal of youth or of strength.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rejuvenescence (re-ju-ven-es'ens) [L. re-, again, + juvenescere, to grow young.] i. A renewal of youth; the return of a cell or tissue to a state in which it was in an earlier stage of existence. 2. In botany, the escape of the protoplasm of a cell and its conversion into a cell of a different character, as occurs in certain algae.
  40. religiosus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      religiosus (re-lij-e-o'-sus) [L. "religious"]. A name given to the superior rectus muscle of the eye.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      religiosus (re-lij*I-o'sus) [L. religious.] The superior rectus muscle of the eye which rolls the eyeball upward, as in the act of prayer.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      religiosus (re-lij*I-o'sus) [L. religious.] The superior rectus muscle of the eye which rolls the eyeball upward, as in the act of prayer.
  41. remittence - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      remitt'ence. A temporary amelioration, without •actual cessation, of symptoms.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      remittence (re-mit'ens). Temporary abatement, without actual cessation, of symptoms.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      remitt'ence. A temporary amelioration, without •actual cessation, of symptoms.
  42. remittent - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      remittent (re-mit'-eni) [remission]. Characterized by remissions, r. fever, a malarial fever characterized by periods of remission without complete apyrexia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      remitt'ent. Characterized by temporary remissions or periods of abatement of the symptoms, r. fever, a severe form of malarial fever in which the temperature falls periodically, nearly but not quite to the normal, the new paroxysm occurring before the symptoms of the former have entirely disappeared.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      remittent (re-mit'tent). Disappearing in part, but recurring periodically. [Lat., remitlens.)
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      remittent (re-mit'ent) [L. remiftere to send back], i. Having periods of abatement and of exacerbation. 2. A fever characterized by remissions. See/etw.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      remitt'ent. Characterized by temporary remissions or periods of abatement of the symptoms, r. fever, a severe form of malarial fever in which the temperature falls periodically, nearly but not quite to the normal, the new paroxysm occurring before the symptoms of the former have entirely disappeared.
  43. reniculus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      reniculus (ren-ik'-u-lus) [L., dim. of rtn, kidney}. Alobule of the kidney :renculus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      reniculus (ren-ik'u-lus), pi. rcnic'uli. One of the lobules composing the kidney, and consisting of a pyramid and its inclosing cortical substance.
  44. renninogen - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rennin'ogen. Prorennin, prochymostn, pexinogen, the zymogen of rennin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      renninogen (ren-in'o-jen). The proenzyme existing in the gastric glands, which, after secretion, is converted into rennin. Called also prorennin, prochymosin, chymosinogen, and pexinogen.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rennin'ogen. Prorennin, prochymostn, pexinogen, the zymogen of rennin.
  45. repand - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      repand (re-pond') [re. back; pandus, bent, crooked]. In biology, applied to a leaf-margin which :e toothed like the margin of an umbrella. A bacterial culture with a wrinkled or wavy edge.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      repand' [L. repandus, bent or turned back.] Noting a leaf or a bacterial colony with edge marked by a series of slightly concave segments with angular projections at their points of union; see cut under colony, 3, c.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      repand (re-pandO [L. re back + pan'dus bent]. Wrinkled or wavy: said of bacterial cultures.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      repand' [L. repandus, bent or turned back.] Noting a leaf or a bacterial colony with edge marked by a series of slightly concave segments with angular projections at their points of union; see cut under colony, 3, c.
  46. repercussive - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      repercussive (re-ptr-kus'-n) [see repercussion]. I. Repellent, 2. A repellent drug.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      repercuss'ive. Driving in or away, repellent.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      repercussive (re-per-kus'iv). An agent causing repercussion; a repellent.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      repercuss'ive. Driving in or away, repellent.
  47. replantation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      replantation (re-plan-la'-shun) [replantare, to plant again). The act of planting again, r. of the teeth, the replacement of teeth which have been extracted or otherwise removed from their cavities; when
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      replanta'tion [G. re-, again, + plantare, to plant.] Noting the experiment of removing an organ or other part of the body, replacing it, and reestablishing its circulation by vascular anastomosis; reimplantation. a. In dentistry, specifically, the replacing of a tooth into the socket from which it has been extracted.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      replantation (re-plan-ta'shun). Same as rtimplantation.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      replanta'tion [G. re-, again, + plantare, to plant.] Noting the experiment of removing an organ or other part of the body, replacing it, and reestablishing its circulation by vascular anastomosis; reimplantation. a. In dentistry, specifically, the replacing of a tooth into the socket from which it has been extracted.
  48. repositor - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      repositor (re-pot' -it-or) [see reposition}. An instrument for replacing parts that have become displaced, especially for replacing a prolapsed umbilical cord; an instrument used in the replacement of a displaced uterus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      repos'itor. An instrument used to replace a dislocated part, especially a prolapsed uterus.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      repositor (re-pos'it-or). An instrument used for replacement or readjustment of a part. [Lat., repositorium.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      repositor (re-poz'it-or). An instrument used in returning displaced organs to the normal position.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      repos'itor. An instrument used to replace a dislocated part, especially a prolapsed uterus.
  49. repullulation - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      repullulation (re-pul-u-la'-shun) [re, again; pullulare, to sprout]. The return of a morbid growth.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      repullulation (re-pul-u-la'shun) [L. re-, again, + puUulare, to sprout.] Renewed germination; the return of a morbid process or growth.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      repullulation (re-pul-u-la'shun). Renewed
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      repullulation (re-pul-u-la'shun) [L. re-, again, + puUulare, to sprout.] Renewed germination; the return of a morbid process or growth.
  50. resinoid - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      resinoid (ret'-in-oid) [resina, a resin; *l8at, like]. i. Resembling a resin. 2. A substance which has some of the properties of a resin. Most of the socalled resinoids are of indefinite chemical composition; others are impure resins.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      res'inoid [L. resina, rosin, + G. eidos, resemblance.] i. Resembling rosin, a. An extract obtained by evaporating a tincture. 3. A substance containing a resin or resembling one.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      resinoid (rez'in-oid). i. Resembling a resin, i. A substance resembling a resin. 3. A dry therapeutic precipitate prepared from a vegetable tincture.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      res'inoid [L. resina, rosin, + G. eidos, resemblance.] i. Resembling rosin, a. An extract obtained by evaporating a tincture. 3. A substance containing a resin or resembling one.
  51. resol - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      resol (ra'-ol). A disinfectant mixture of saponified wood-tar and methyl-alcohol.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      resol (re'sol). A proprietary wood-tar and potashsoap preparation: disinfectant.
  52. resorcin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      resorcin (re-zor'-sin). See resorcinol.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      resorcin (re-zor'sin). Resorcinol.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      resorcin (re-zor'sin). A whitish, crystalline diatomic phenol, C,H((OH)2: isomeric with hydroquinon and pyrocatechin, and produced by fusing sodium benzene disulphonate with sodium hydroxid. It is soluble in water, ether, alcohol, chloroform, etc., and is used as an antiseptic and antipyretic, in a 2 per cent, solution for spraying the throat in whooping-cough and hay-fever, and in ointments for skin diseases. Dose, a-io gr. (0.133-0.666 gm.). r. monoacelate, euresol.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      resorcin (re-zor'sin). Resorcinol.
  53. restiform - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      restiform (res'tif^rm) [L. res'tis rope + for'mt form]. Shaped like a rope. See under body.
  54. restis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      restis (res'-tis) [L., "a rope"]. The restiform body.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      res'tis [L. rope.] Corpus restiforme.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      restis (res'tis), pi. res'tes [L. " rope "]. Same u restibrachium.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      res'tis [L. rope.] Corpus restiforme.
  55. resupinate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      resupinate (re-su'-pin-&t) [re, again; supinare, to bend backward]. Turned in a direction opposite to normal; as an ovary with its apex downward.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      resu'pinate. i. To supinate, to turn on the back. 2. Supinated; lying on the back, supine.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      resu'pinate. i. To supinate, to turn on the back. 2. Supinated; lying on the back, supine.
  56. resupination - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      resupina'tion. Supination; lying, or turning over, on the back.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      resupination (re"su-pin-a'shun) [L. resv fins'n to turn on the back], i. The act of turning upon the back or dorsum. 2. The position of one lying upon the back.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      resupina'tion. Supination; lying, or turning over, on the back.
  57. reticula - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      reticula (ret-ik'-u-lah) [pi. of reticulum, a network]. The preferred name for formatio reticularis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      retic'ula. j. Plural of L. reticulum. 3. Formatio reticularis (a).
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      reticula (re-tik'u-lah) [L. " a little net"]. A fibrous network connected with the lateral edge of the posterior gray horn of the cord.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      retic'ula. j. Plural of L. reticulum. 3. Formatio reticularis (a).
  58. reticulitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      reticulitis (re-tik-u-li'tis). Inflammation of the reticulum of a ruminant animal.
  59. retiform - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ret'iform [L. rete, network, + forma, form.] Resembling a net or network.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      retiform (ret'if-orm) [L. relifor'mis; refte net + Jor'ma form). Resembling a network.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ret'iform [L. rete, network, + forma, form.] Resembling a net or network.
  60. retinaculum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      retinaculum (ret-in-ak'-u-lum) [L., "a band"]. A band or membrane holding back an organ or part. r. costas ultimatae. Same as lumbo-costal ligament, fj. 9. retinacula cutis, fibrous bands connecting the corium with the underlying fascia, r. ligament! arcuati, the short external lateral ligament of the knee-joint, r. Morgagni, r. of the ileocecal valve, the ridge formed by the coming together of the valvesegments at each end of the opening between the cecum and the ileum. r. musculare tendinis subscapularis majoris, a name for the inconstant brachiocapsularis muscle originating in the shaft of the humerus and inserted into the capsular ligament of the shoulder joint, retinacula ossis brachii, fibrous bands inserted into the neck of the humerus and
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      retinaculum (ret-in-ak'u-lum), pi. retinac'ula [L. " baiter]. i. A structure which retains an organ or tissue in its place. 3. A tenaculum for operations on hernia. Barry's r., any one of a set of filaments within the graafian follicles, r. cap sulee articula'ris cox'a, one of the longitudinal folds of the cervical portion of the capsular ligament of the hip. r. cu'tis. i. One of the bands of connective tissue attaching the corium to the subcutaneous tissue. 2. One of the folds of skin around a joint. r. of the ileocecal valve, a ridge on the internal surface of the cecum at either end of the opening of the ileocecal valve. r. ligamen'tl arena ti, a short external lateral ligament of the knee-joint, r. morgaR'ni. a ridge formed by the coming together of segments of the ilcocccal valve. Called also r. of ileocecal valve. T. peroneo'rum infe'rius, a band across the peroneal tendons on the outside of the calcaneum. r. peroneo'rum supe'rius, the external annular ligament of the ankle, r. ten'dinum, an annular ligament of the ankle or wrist. Weitbrecht's r., any one of a set of ligaments attached to the great trochanter.
  61. retractor - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      retractor (re-trak'-lor) [retract]. An instrument for drawing back the lips of a wound so as to give a better view of the deeper parts.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      retrac'tor. An instrument for drawing aside the lips of a wound.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      retractor (re-trak'tor). The instrument for drawing back the edges of a wound. [Fr., rctractcur.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      retractor (re-trak'tor) [L.]. i. An instrument for drawing back the edges of a wound. 2. Any retractile muscle. See muscles, table of. Emmet's r., a self-retaining vaginal speculum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      retrac'tor. An instrument for drawing aside the lips of a wound.
  62. retrobulbar - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      retrobulbar (re-tro-bul'-bar) [retro-; bulbar]. i. Situated or occurring behind the eyeball. 2. Behind the medulla oblongata. r. neuritis, inflammation in the orbital part of the optic nerve, r. perineuritis, inflammation of the sheath of the orbital part of the optic nerve.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      retrobul'bar [L. retro, behind, + bulbus, bulb.] i. Behind the eyeball. 2. Posterior to the medulla oblongata.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      retrobulbar (re-tro-bul'bar) [L. re'tro back + bul'bus bulb). Situated or occurring behind the pons or behind the eyeball.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      retrobul'bar [L. retro, behind, + bulbus, bulb.] i. Behind the eyeball. 2. Posterior to the medulla oblongata.
  63. retrocecal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      retrocecal (rt-trosc'-kal). Pertaining to the back of the cecum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      retrocecal (re-tro-se'kal). Behind the cecum.
  64. retrocedent - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      retrocedent (re-tro-se'-dent) [retro-; cedere, to go]. Going back; disappearing from the surface, r. gout, a form of gout in which the joint-in flam ma tion suddenly disappears and is replaced by affections of the internal organs.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      retroce'dent [L. retro, backward, + cedere, to go.] Going back. r. gout, an attack of gout in which the articular symptoms subside with involvement of some internal organ, such as the stomach.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      retrocedent (re-tro-se'dent) [L. retroce'drns going back], i. Going back, or returning. 5. Disappearing from the surface and affecting some interior organ.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      retroce'dent [L. retro, backward, + cedere, to go.] Going back. r. gout, an attack of gout in which the articular symptoms subside with involvement of some internal organ, such as the stomach.
  65. retrodisplacement - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      retrodisplace'ment. Any backward displacement, such as retroversion or retroflexion of the uterus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      retrodisplacement (re"tro-dis-plas'ment). A backward displacement.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      retrodisplace'ment. Any backward displacement, such as retroversion or retroflexion of the uterus.
  66. retroflected - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      retroflected (re-tro-jlek'-ted). Same as retroflexed.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      retroflec'ted [L. retro, backward, + fiectere, to bend.] Retroflexed.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      retroflec'ted [L. retro, backward, + fiectere, to bend.] Retroflexed.
  67. retroflexion - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      retroflexion (re-tro-flek'-shun) [retro-; flexion], The state of being bent backward, r. of the uterus. a condition in which the uterus is bent backward upon itself, producing a sharp angle in its axis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      retroflex'ion. Retroflection, backward bending, as of the uterus when the body is bent back, forming an angle with the cervix.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      retroflexion (re-tro-flek'shun) [L. retroflafie]. The bending of an organ so that its top is thrust back.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      retroflex'ion. Retroflection, backward bending, as of the uterus when the body is bent back, forming an angle with the cervix.
  68. retrojection - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      retrojec'tion [L. retro, backward, + jacere, to throw.] The washing out of a cavity by the backward flow of an injected fluid.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      retrojection (re-tro-jek'shun). Irrigacer of a canal from within outward b? stream carried by a tube to the deep par; of the canal. [Lat., retro, backward, jacere, to throw.]
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      retrojec'tion [L. retro, backward, + jacere, to throw.] The washing out of a cavity by the backward flow of an injected fluid.
  69. retropharynx - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      retropharynx (re-tro-far'-inks). ~ The posterior portion of the pharynx.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      retrophar'ynx. The posterior part of the pharynx.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      retrophar'ynx. The posterior part of the pharynx.
  70. retrosternal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      retroster'nal. Behind the sternum.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      retroster'nal. Behind the sternum.
  71. retroverted - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      retrovert'ed. Turned or inclined backward, without being bent.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      retrovert'ed. Turned or inclined backward, without being bent.
  72. revaccination - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      revaccination (re-vak-sin-a'-shun) [revaccinatio]. Renewed or repeated vaccination.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      revaccina'tion. Vaccination of a person previously successfully vaccinated.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      revaccina'tion. Vaccination of a person previously successfully vaccinated.
  73. revellent - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      revellent (re-vet'-enf). See revulsive.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      revell'ent [L. re-, back, + vellere, to draw.] Revulsive.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      revell'ent [L. re-, back, + vellere, to draw.] Revulsive.
  74. rhatany - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rhatany (rat'-an-e). See krameria.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rhat'any. Ratany, krameria (N.F.). Brazilian r., the dried root of Krameria argentea. Para' r., Brazilian r. Peru'vian r., the dried root of Krameria triandra. Savanill'a r., the dried root of Krameria ixina.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rhat'any. Ratany, krameria (N.F.). Brazilian r., the dried root of Krameria argentea. Para' r., Brazilian r. Peru'vian r., the dried root of Krameria triandra. Savanill'a r., the dried root of Krameria ixina.
  75. rhein - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rhe'in. A crystalline substance of little or no activity, obtained from rhubarb.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rhe'in. A crystalline substance of little or no activity, obtained from rhubarb.
  76. rheoscope - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rheoscope (re'-o-sksp) [rheo-; to see]. An instrument for demonstrating the existence of an electric current; a galvanoscope.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rhe'oscope [G. rheos, stream, + skoped, I view.] Electroscope, galvanoscope.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rhe'oscope [G. rheos, stream, + skoped, I view.] Electroscope, galvanoscope.
  77. rheotaxis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rheotax'is [G. rhco, I flow, + taxis, orderly arrangement.] A form of positive barotaxis, in which a body is impelled to move contrary to the direction of the current in a fluid in which it is.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rheotaxis (re-o-tak'sis) [Gr. ,», current + r&Ctt arrangement]. The phenomenon of a body moving in a direction contrary to the current of the fluid in which it lies.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rheotax'is [G. rhco, I flow, + taxis, orderly arrangement.] A form of positive barotaxis, in which a body is impelled to move contrary to the direction of the current in a fluid in which it is.
  78. rheotropism - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rheotropism. Rheotaxis.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      rheotropism (re-ot'ro-pizm). A tendency to movement in a mass of protoplasm, induced by the action of a current of water. R. is positive when the animal tends to move toward the source of the current,
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rheotropism (re-ot'ro-pizm) [see rhtotrope]. Rheotaxis.
  79. rheumic - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rheumic (roo'-mik) [rheum]. Pertaining to rheum. r. diathesis, one that gives rise to cutaneous eruptions.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rheumic (roo'mik). i. Catarrhal, eczematous. a Relating to rhubarb, r. acid, an acid, Cj0H,2O^ derived from rheotannic acid, rhex'is [G. rhexis, rupture.] Bursting or rupture of
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rheumic (roo'mik). i. Catarrhal, eczematous. a Relating to rhubarb, r. acid, an acid, Cj0H,2O^ derived from rheotannic acid, rhex'is [G. rhexis, rupture.] Bursting or rupture of
  80. rhexis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rhexis (rek'sis) [L.; Gr. MM- Tne rupture of an organ or a vessel.
  81. rhigolene - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rhigolene (rig'-o-len) [plyot, cold]. A very volatile liquid obtained from petroleum by distillation, and used as a local anesthetic. Its rapid evaporation freezes and benumbs the part upon which it is sprayed.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rhigolene (rig'o-lSn) [G. rhigos, cold, 4- elaion, oil.] A very volatile liquid obtained in the distillation of petroleum; employed as a local anesthetic, its rapid evaporation, when sprayed on the skin, causing a freezing of the tissues, rhi'nal [G. rhis(rhin-~), nose.] Relating to the nose,
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rhigolene (rig'o-len) [Gr. /.i'-,% cold]. A light, inflammable petroleum distillate composed of butane and certain hydrocarbons. It evaporates rapidly, producing a lowering of the temperature of the surface from which it evaporates. It is used as a local freezing anesthetic for minor surgical operations.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rhigolene (rig'o-lSn) [G. rhigos, cold, 4- elaion, oil.] A very volatile liquid obtained in the distillation of petroleum; employed as a local anesthetic, its rapid evaporation, when sprayed on the skin, causing a freezing of the tissues, rhi'nal [G. rhis(rhin-~), nose.] Relating to the nose,
  82. rhinalgia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rhinalgia (ri-nal'-je-ah) [rhin-; AX-yat, pain]. Pain in the nose.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rhinalgia (ri-nal'je-ah) [Gr. fa nose + 4X-y<w pain]. Pain in the nose.
  83. rhinencephalon - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rhinenceph'alon [G. rhis(rhin-), nose, +
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rhinencephalon (ri-nen-sef'al-on) [Gr. fa nose + lyn(ipa\os brain]. The olfactory portion of the brain.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rhinenceph'alon [G. rhis(rhin-), nose, +
  84. rhineurynter - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rhineurynter (ri-nu-rin'-ter) [rhin-; cBpfocv. to dilate], A distensible bag or sac which is inflated after insertion into the nostril.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rhineurynter (ri-nu-riu'ter) [G. rhis(rhin-), nose, -f euryno, I dilate.] A dilatable bag used to mats pressure within the nostril to arrest a profuse epistaxis.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rhineurynter (rin-u-rin'ter) [Gr. fa nose + ri>p6vtui to widen]. A dilatable rubber bag for distending a nostril.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rhineurynter (ri-nu-riu'ter) [G. rhis(rhin-), nose, -f euryno, I dilate.] A dilatable bag used to mats pressure within the nostril to arrest a profuse epistaxis.
  85. rhinion - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rhinion (rin'-e-on) [j>b, nose]. The lower point of the suture between the nasal bones. See under craniometric point.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rhinion (rinl-on) [G. rhinion, nostril.] A craniometric point, the lower end of the suture between the nasal bones, punctum nasale inferius,
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      rhinion (rin'e-on). The lower point of the suture between the nasal bones. [Gr-, rinion, dim. of ris, the nose.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rhinion (rin'e-on) [Gr. friviov nostril]. The lower end of the suture between the nasal bones.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rhinion (rinl-on) [G. rhinion, nostril.] A craniometric point, the lower end of the suture between the nasal bones, punctum nasale inferius,
  86. rhinolalia - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rhinolalia (ri-no-la'-le-ah) [rhino-; XoXtA, speech]. A nasal tone in the voice due to nasal defect. The imperfect articulation may be due to undue closure (rhinolalia clausa) or to undue patulousness (rhinolalia aperta) of the posterior nares.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rhinola'lia [G. rhis(rhin-), nose, + lalia, talking.] Nasal speech, rhinophonia, rhinism; it may be caused by abnormal size of the posterior nasal apertures, r. aper'ta, or by partial or complete closure of the same, r. clau'sa.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rhinolalia (ri-no-la'le-ah) [Gr. fa nose + XoXtA speech]. A nasal quality of voice due to some disease or defect of the nasal passages, r. aper'ta, that which is caused by undue patency of the posterior nares. r. clau'sa, that which is due to undue closure of the nasal passages.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rhinola'lia [G. rhis(rhin-), nose, + lalia, talking.] Nasal speech, rhinophonia, rhinism; it may be caused by abnormal size of the posterior nasal apertures, r. aper'ta, or by partial or complete closure of the same, r. clau'sa.
  87. rhinolaryngitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rhinolaryngitis (ri-no-lar-in-ji'(je')tis) [G. rhis (rhin-), nose, + larynx(Iaryng-) + -itis.] Inflammation of the nasal and laryngeal mucous membranes.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rhinolaryngitis (ri"no-lar-in-ji'tis). Inflammation of the mucous membrane of the nose and larynx.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rhinolaryngitis (ri-no-lar-in-ji'(je')tis) [G. rhis (rhin-), nose, + larynx(Iaryng-) + -itis.] Inflammation of the nasal and laryngeal mucous membranes.
  88. rhinologist - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rhinologist (ri-nol'-o-jisl) [rhinology], A specialist in the treatment of diseases of the nose.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rhinol'ogist. One versed in rhinology, a specialist in diseases of the nose.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rhinologist (ri-nol'o-jist). An expert in the knowledge and treatment of diseases of the nose.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rhinol'ogist. One versed in rhinology, a specialist in diseases of the nose.
  89. rhinopharyngitis - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rhinopharyngitis (ri-no-far-in-jif-tis) [rhino-; pharyngitis], Inflammation of the nose and pharynx, or of the nasopharynx.
  90. rhinophyma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rhinophyma (ri-no-fi'-mah) [rhino-; ^C^ia, tumor]. A form of acne rosacca of the nose characterized by a marked hypertrophy of the blood-vessels and the connective tissue, producing a lobulated appearance of the nose.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rhinophyma (ri-no-fi'mah) [Gr. frit nose + growth). A nodular swelling and congestion of the nose.
  91. rhinoscleroma - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rhinoscleroma (ri'no-skle-ro'mah) [G. rhis(rhin-), nose, + skleros, hard, -I- -oma.] A hard, nodular, reddish, glossy growth, tender on pressure, but not spontaneously painful, occurring chiefly at the anterior nares, but occasionally in the external auditory meatus. It is believed to be due to the presence of a specific bacillus.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      rhinoscleroma (ri-no-skle-ro'mah). A specific local disease, characterized by the development of densely hard, painless, slowly increasing nodules or plaques about the anterior nares and adjacent parts. [Gr., ris, the nose, + skleroma, an induration.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rhinoscleroma (ri"no-skle-ro'mah) [Gr. frit nose + (TKX^pcd/ja a hard swelling]. A form of indurated growth of the skin and mucous membrane of the nose. The growth is of the nature of granulation tissue, and forms hard patches or nodules, which tend to increase in size and are painful on pressure. The disease is ascribed to the presence of the Bacil'lui rhinosdero'tnotii.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rhinoscleroma (ri'no-skle-ro'mah) [G. rhis(rhin-), nose, + skleros, hard, -I- -oma.] A hard, nodular, reddish, glossy growth, tender on pressure, but not spontaneously painful, occurring chiefly at the anterior nares, but occasionally in the external auditory meatus. It is believed to be due to the presence of a specific bacillus.
  92. rhomboideus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rhomboideus (rom-boid'-e-us). See under muscle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rhomboideus (rom-bo-id'e-us). See under miunbs.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rhomboideus (rom-bo-id'e-us). See under miunbs.
  93. ridgel - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ridgel (<;;'v,M [origin uncertain]. A male Animal having one testicle removed or wanting.
  94. ring-bone - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ring-bone. A bony deposit on the pastern of a horse, forming a more or less complete ring around the bone; occurring just above the coronet, it is called low ring-bone, in the middle of the pastern. high ring-bone, false r.-b., an exostosis on the middle or upper part of the long pastern bone in the horse.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ring-bone (ring'bSn). A bone-like callus on the pastern bone of a horse, resulting from inflammation. Frequently it extends into the interphalangeal joints, causing lameness. When the joint is not involved, the condition is sometimes called false ring-bone, low r-b. See buttress foot, under foot.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ring-bone. A bony deposit on the pastern of a horse, forming a more or less complete ring around the bone; occurring just above the coronet, it is called low ring-bone, in the middle of the pastern. high ring-bone, false r.-b., an exostosis on the middle or upper part of the long pastern bone in the horse.
  95. risorius - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      risorius (ri-so'-re-us) [ridere, to laugh]. Laughing. r. muscle. See under muscle.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      risorius (ri-saw'rl-us) [L. risor, a laugher.] See under musculus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      risorius (ri-so're-us) [L.]. See muscles, table of.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      risorius (ri-saw'rl-us) [L. risor, a laugher.] See under musculus.
  96. ristin - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      ristin. The monobenzoic acid ester of ethylene glycoll; it has been recommended in scabies.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      ristin (ris'tin). Ethyleneglycol monobenzoate: used in scabies.
  97. rivulose - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rivulose (riv'u-l6s) [L. rivus, a brook.] Marked by irregular wavy lines, like the rivers on a map; noting the appearance of a bacterial colony.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rivulose (riv'u-Ios) [L. ri'vns brook]. Marked by wavy lines: said of bacterial colonies.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rivulose (riv'u-l6s) [L. rivus, a brook.] Marked by irregular wavy lines, like the rivers on a map; noting the appearance of a bacterial colony.
  98. roentgenize - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      roentgenize (rent'gen-iz). To apply the Roentgen rays in diagnosis or treatment.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      roentgenize (rent'gen-iz). To apply the Roentgen rays in diagnosis or treatment.
  99. roentgenograph - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      roentgenograph (rent-gen1-o-graf). To make a roentgenogram.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      roentgenograph (rent'gen-o-graf). To make a roentgenogram.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      roentgenograph (rent'gen-o-graf). i. A Roentgen-ray photograph, a. To make a Roentgen-ray photograph.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      roentgenograph (rent'gen-o-graf). To make a roentgenogram.
  100. roentgenography - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      roentgenography (rent-gen-og'-ra-fe). Same as skiagraphy, q. v.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      roentgenog'raphy [Roentgen (rays) + G. grapho, I write.] Examination of any part of the body for diagnostic purposes by means of the Roentgen rays, the record of the findings being impressed upon a photographic plate; skiagraphy.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      roentgenography (rent-gen-og/raf-«). Photography by the Roentgen rays.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      roentgenog'raphy [Roentgen (rays) + G. grapho, I write.] Examination of any part of the body for diagnostic purposes by means of the Roentgen rays, the record of the findings being impressed upon a photographic plate; skiagraphy.
  101. roentgenology - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      roentgenology (rcnt-gen-ol'-o-je) [Roentgen rays; X6-y<*, treatise]7 The study of the roentgen rays.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      roentgenol'ogy [Roentgen (rays) + G. -logia.] The study of the Roentgen rays* in all their applications.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      roentgenology (rent-gen-ol'o-je) [Raentfen rtyi + (•r. A6-yos treatise]. The study of the Roentgen rays.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      roentgenol'ogy [Roentgen (rays) + G. -logia.] The study of the Roentgen rays* in all their applications.
  102. rosein - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rosein (ro'ze-in). Fuchsin.
  103. roseolous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      roseolous (ro-ze1-o-lus) [roseus, rosy]. Having the character of roseola.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      roseolous (ro-ze'o-lus). Relating to or resembling roseola.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      roseolous (ro-ze'o-lus). Relating to or resembling roseola.
  104. rostellum - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rostellum (ros-tel'-um) [dim. of rostrum]. A little beak, especially the hook-bearing portion of the head of certain worms.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rostell'um [L. dim. of rostrum, a beak.] The anterior portion of the head of a tapeworm, provided with a row of hooks.
    • Appleton's Medical Dictionary (1915)
      rostellum (ros-tel'lum). A small beak at a process resembling a small hook, especially that portion of the head of an eno> Farasitic worm which bears the book Lat., rostetlum. a little beak.]
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rostellum (ros-tel'um), pi. rostefla [L. " little beak"]. A small beak or hook-like process; especially the hook-bearing part of the head of an endoparasitic worm.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rostell'um [L. dim. of rostrum, a beak.] The anterior portion of the head of a tapeworm, provided with a row of hooks.
  105. rostrate - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rostrate (ros'-trat) [rostrum]. Furnished with a beak or beak-like process.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ros'trate [L. rostratus.] Having a beak or hook.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rostrate (ros'trat) [L. rostra'tus beaked]. Having a beak-like process.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ros'trate [L. rostratus.] Having a beak or hook.
  106. rostriform - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rostriform (ros -trif-orm) [rostrum, beak-; forma, form]. Shaped like a rostrum.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ros'triform [L. rostrum, beak, + forma, form.] Beak-shaped.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rostriform (ros'trif-orm) [L. ros'trum beak t for'ma form]. Shaped like a beak.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ros'triform [L. rostrum, beak, + forma, form.] Beak-shaped.
  107. rubedo - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rubedo (roo^be'-do) [ruber, red]. Any diffused redness of the skin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rube'do [L. redness.] A temporary redness or flushing of the skin, blushing.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rubedo (ru-be'do) [1, ]. Blushing or other redness of the skin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rube'do [L. redness.] A temporary redness or flushing of the skin, blushing.
  108. rubefacient - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rubefacient (roo-be-fa'-she-ent) [ruber; facere, to make], z. Causing redness of the skin. 2. An agent that causes redness of the skin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rubefacient (ru-be-fa'shent) [L. ruber, red, + facere, to make.] I. Causing a reddening of the skin. 2. A mild counterirritant which reddens the skin.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rubefacient (ru-be-fa'shent) [L. ru'ber red +J'at'cere to make], i. Reddening the skin. _•. An agent that reddens the skin.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rubefacient (ru-be-fa'shent) [L. ruber, red, + facere, to make.] I. Causing a reddening of the skin. 2. A mild counterirritant which reddens the skin.
  109. rubiginous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rubiginous (r^>-i>ij'-in-us) [rubiginosus, rusty]. Rust-colored.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rubiginous (ru-bij'in-us) [L. rubigo, rust.] Rusty, of the color of iron rust.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rubiginous (ru-bij'in-us) [L. rubigo, rust.] Rusty, of the color of iron rust.
  110. rubigo - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rubigo (roo-W'-fo) [L.l. Rust.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rubi'go [L.] Rxist, mildew.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rubigo (ru-bi'go). Latin for rust. rubin (ru'bin). Same as fuchsin. Bubinat water (ru'bin-at). See under water. Buhner's test (roob'nerz) [Max. Rubner, physiologist in Berlin, born 1854]. See under tests. rubor (ru'bor) [L. " redness"]. Redness due to
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rubi'go [L.] Rxist, mildew.
  111. rubrospinal - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rubrospi'nal. Relating to the red nucleus and the spinal cord. r. system, the linking of the reel nucleus with the opposite side of the spinal cord by means of the r. tract, or Monakoff's bundle. r. tract, see under tract.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rubrospi'nal. Relating to the red nucleus and the spinal cord. r. system, the linking of the reel nucleus with the opposite side of the spinal cord by means of the r. tract, or Monakoff's bundle. r. tract, see under tract.
  112. rugine - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rugine (ru-zhen') [I'r.] Periosteum elevator, raspatory.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rugine (roo-zhJn'). A raspatory.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rugine (ru-zhen') [I'r.] Periosteum elevator, raspatory.
  113. rugitus - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rugitus (roo-gi'-lus). See bombus.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ru'gitus [L. roaring.] Borborygmus, intestinal rumbling.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rugitus (ru'jit-us) [L. "roaring"]. Rumbling in the intestines.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ru'gitus [L. roaring.] Borborygmus, intestinal rumbling.
  114. rugous - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rugous (roo'-gus). Sec rugose.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ru'gous. Rugose.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ru'gous. Rugose.
  115. rumenotomy - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rumenotomy (roo-men-ot'-o-mc) [rumen, the gullet; .-.>.<(!, to cut]. Incision of the rumen or paunch of an animal.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      rumenot'omy [L. rumen + G. tome, incision.) Incision into the first stomach of a ruminant.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rumenotomy (ru-men-ot'o-me) [rumen -f Gr.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      rumenot'omy [L. rumen + G. tome, incision.) Incision into the first stomach of a ruminant.
  116. rupial - load - verify - check links - defined elsewhere
    • The Practitioner's Medical Dictionary (Gould, 1919)
      rupial (roo'-pe-al) [rupia]. Resembling or characterized by rupia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1919)
      ru'pial. Relating to rupia.
    • American Illustrated Medical Dictionary (1922)
      rupial (ru'pe-al). Pertaining to, resembling, or due to, rupia.
    • A Practical Medical Dictionary (Stedman, 1922)
      ru'pial. Relating to rupia.