User:Visviva/NYT 20070102

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
← Previous (2007-01-01) Words harvested from the New York Times, 2007-01-02
  • List status: open
→ Next (2007-01-03)

This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-01-02 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-01).

[ see all NYT pages ] - [ see all tracking lists ]

74733 tokens ‧ 55815 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 8088 types ‧ 30 (~ 0.371%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-01-02[edit]

  1. anguishing
    • 2007 January 2, Sheryl Gay Stolberg, “Kissinger’s Appearance Revives Memories of Vietnam Era”, New York Times:
      Given Mr. Kissinger’s firsthand experience in the anguishing decisions about withdrawal from Vietnam, the disclosure sparked the inevitable Iraq-Vietnam comparisons that Mr. Bush has assiduously sought to avoid.
      add
  2. antidesertification
  3. battlewagons
  4. bigs
  5. classmen
  6. eroticization
    • 2007 January 2, “Our Girls Are Growing Up Way Too Fast (3 Letters)”, New York Times:
      A round of applause to Lawrence Downes for pointing out that the premature eroticization of young girls could never happen if their parents woke up and thought about the behavior they’re tolerating — and outright encouraging.
      add
  7. generationwide
    • 2007 January 2, Jon Pareles, “Pop Music and the War: The Sound of Resignation”, New York Times:
      Iraq may be turning into a quagmire and civil war like Vietnam, but the current war has not inspired talk of generationwide rebellion (perhaps because there’s no draft to pit young against old) or any colorful, psychedelically defiant counterculture.
      add
  8. gossipmonger
  9. hippiedom
    • 2007 January 2, Michiko Kakutani, “The Haze and the Tumult, Revisited”, New York Times:
      With fiction like “Dog Soldiers” (1974), Robert Stone emerged as one of the few novelists to capture the hallucinatory, apocalyptic madness of the late ’60s, the maelstrom of youthful passion, heedless idealism and dangerous excess that characterized those years and presaged the social tumult to come as Woodstock gave way to Altamont, as happy hippiedom gave way to the Manson murders, as Kool-Aid acid tests gave way to what would become death-by-beverage in Jim Jones’s Guyana a decade later.
      add
  10. medicalization
  11. methazolamide
    • 2007 January 2, Jane E. Brody, “To Protect Against Drug Errors, Ask Questions”, New York Times:
      That is, until she went to the pharmacy to pick up a refill of methazolamide, the pills she took to control her glaucoma, and instead was given methotrexate, a potent chemotherapy drug that suppresses immunity.
      add
  12. meting
    • 2007 January 2, Alessandra Stanley, “Checking Out, in Style or in Turmoil”, New York Times:
      The background noise in a camera-cellphone recording of Saddam Hussein ’s execution — jostling and sectarian insults — belied the Iraqi government’s portrait of the hasty hanging as a cool, considered meting of justice.
      add
  13. miscalibrated
    • 2007 January 2, “Holding the Line”, New York Times:
      But the relaxation of a few miscalibrated, onerous provisions is where this effort should end.
      add
  14. multitile
    • 2007 January 2, Martha Schwendener, “A Road Through History, Paved in Spanish Tile”, New York Times:
      By the 17th and 18th centuries Valencian craftsmen were producing elaborate, multitile scenarios featuring local martyrs, like “Flagellation of St. Vincent Martyr,” or large-scale compositions, like “St. Joachim and the Virgin as a Child,” or “Holy Family” from 1787, surrounded by a twisting vegetal border.
      add
  15. nondesert
  16. nonfertile
  17. overdiagnosis
  18. predisease
    • 2007 January 2, H. Gilbert Welch, Lisa Schwartz And Steven Woloshin, “What’s Making Us Sick Is an Epidemic of Diagnoses”, New York Times:
      And for the many labeled as having predisease or as being “at risk” but destined to remain healthy, treatment can only cause harm.
      add
  19. prewashed
    • 2007 January 2, Denise Grady, “When Bad Things Come From ‘Good’ Food”, New York Times:
      In addition, he said, bagged and prewashed produce didn’t exist 25 years ago, and people today eat more raw vegetables than in the past.
      add
  20. psychedelically
    • 2007 January 2, Jon Pareles, “Pop Music and the War: The Sound of Resignation”, New York Times:
      Iraq may be turning into a quagmire and civil war like Vietnam, but the current war has not inspired talk of generationwide rebellion (perhaps because there’s no draft to pit young against old) or any colorful, psychedelically defiant counterculture.
      add
  21. sleeplike
    • 2007 January 2, C. Claiborne Ray, “Sleeping Vines”, New York Times:
      One well-known and well-studied sleeplike state is called nyctinasty, or night movement.
      add
  22. subbasement
    • 2007 January 2, Dan Hurley, “In Atlanta, Medical Sleuths of Last Resort”, New York Times:
      Now, after years of toiling in the subbasement of a 1950s-era building on the C.D.C.’s campus, Dr. Zaki’s team has moved to a futuristic-looking building nearby where the window shades automatically rise or fall depending on the amount of sunshine, a transmission electron microscope stands ready to magnify bacteria and viruses up to 740,000 times, and images of deadly pathogens pass for décor.
      add
  23. supership
    • 2007 January 2, John Curtis Perry, Scott Borgerson And Rockford Weitz, “The Deep Blue Highway”, New York Times:
      The slump in American shipping is especially surprising when you consider that it was American entrepreneurs who, in the mid-20th century, revolutionized oceanic transport by creating both the standard-size steel shipping container and the supership capable of transporting 50 times as much cargo as a World War II-era merchant ship could.
      add
  24. ultrasounds
  25. unmatchable
  26. vasospasm

Sequestered[edit]

  1. gefilte -> gefilte fish