User:Visviva/NYT 20070107

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-01-07 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-01).

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195858 tokens ‧ 145098 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13767 types ‧ 98 (~ 0.712%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-01-07[edit]

  1. arriver
  2. bandsaw
  3. bangda
    • 2007 January 7, Paul Gray, “Gangsta Raj”, New York Times:
      Those who plunge into the novel soon find themselves thrashing in a sea of words and sentences (“On Maganchand Road the thela-wallahs already had their fruit piled high, and the fishsellers were laying out bangda and bombil and paaplet on their slabs”) unencumbered by italics or explication.
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  4. barrista
    • 2007 January 7, Margy Rochlin, “Dry as Ever, Shrugging at Hollywood”, New York Times:
      A couple of hours after lunch it was hard to tell exactly what Mr. Arkin was feeling when a tall, skinny Starbucks barrista grew excited as she filled his order of hot chocolate.
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  5. bombil
    • 2007 January 7, Paul Gray, “Gangsta Raj”, New York Times:
      Those who plunge into the novel soon find themselves thrashing in a sea of words and sentences (“On Maganchand Road the thela-wallahs already had their fruit piled high, and the fishsellers were laying out bangda and bombil and paaplet on their slabs”) unencumbered by italics or explication.
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  6. bunkerlike
    • 2007 January 7, Paul Gray, “Gangsta Raj”, New York Times:
      Following up on the tip, Inspector Singh and Ganpatrao Katekar, his longtime friend and constable, arrive at “an impregnable white cube,” a bunkerlike structure outfitted with security cameras.
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  7. buzzless
    • 2007 January 7, Caryn James, “As the Flattery Flies: A Buzzology Primer”, New York Times:
      The December issue of Elle has the currently buzzless Beyoncé Knowles on its long-planned cover, teasing an article about her life and “Oscar-worthy” role in “Dreamgirls.”
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  8. carful
    • 2007 January 7, Margy Rochlin, “Dry as Ever, Shrugging at Hollywood”, New York Times:
      Mr. Arkin’s description of what happened next sounds not unlike one of the more luckless moments in “Little Miss Sunshine”: the carful of Arkins hit town just in time for the acrimonious set decorators’ strike of 1945. “
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  9. casitas
    • 2007 January 7, Elaine Glusac, “Hotel Décor: Where Fires Are Cool”, New York Times:
      And the Boulders Resort (866-397-6520, www.theboulders.com ) in Carefree, Ariz., where a bonfire marks the entrance, will introduce a redesign by late this year, but its casitas will still have their kiva fireplaces, stocked with wood and matches.
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  10. castrators
    • 2007 January 7, Lauren Collins, “Faces of War”, New York Times:
      “I remind myself,” McCleary says, unconvincingly, “that in medieval times, surgeons and dentists were classified under the sign of Mars along with butchers, barbers, tinkers, castrators of animals, murderers and hangmen.”
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  11. cepes
    • 2007 January 7, “On the Mild Side”, New York Times:
      The current menu includes sugar cane and coffee marinated pork chop with cepes and white sweet potato purée; and fingerling-potato-crusted striped bass with broccoli purée and maple red wine sauce.
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  12. counterplay
  13. coupelike
  14. customizer
  15. dominionists
    • 2007 January 7, Rick Perlstein, “Christian Empire”, New York Times:
      But unless I speak too soon, one notable thing about today’s Christian dominionists is how little recent violence they have unleashed.
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  16. dormlike
    • 2007 January 7, Joyce Cohen, “Where the Grass Is Greener”, New York Times:
      From left: a one-bedroom apartment at Windsor Court in Murray Hill had a dormlike feel; a house on East 27th Street had tiny rooms and a very low ceiling in the kitchen; the one-bedroom at Windsor Park has no view, but is just a block from Central Park; Christoffer Eriksson and Muge Tuncel Eriksson with Barkley.
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  17. empathetically
    • 2007 January 7, Elissa Schappell, “Exile on Sesame Street”, New York Times:
      Some readers with children will chuckle empathetically at the couple’s travails.
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  18. epiphanic
    • 2007 January 7, John T. Edge, “Meals Cooked and Eaten”, New York Times:
      And he knows the value of an epiphanic feed.
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  19. fishsellers
    • 2007 January 7, Paul Gray, “Gangsta Raj”, New York Times:
      Those who plunge into the novel soon find themselves thrashing in a sea of words and sentences (“On Maganchand Road the thela-wallahs already had their fruit piled high, and the fishsellers were laying out bangda and bombil and paaplet on their slabs”) unencumbered by italics or explication.
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  20. formularies
  21. formulary
    • 2007 January 7, Robert Pear, “Democrats’ Drug Plan Has Pitfalls, Critics Say”, New York Times:
      Each plan would establish its own list of covered drugs, known as a formulary, and the secretary could not “establish or require a particular formulary.”
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  22. glump
    • 2007 January 7, “Isaac Bashevis Singer”, New York Times:
      In his review of Florence Noiville’s biography of Isaac Bashevis Singer (Dec. 24), D. T. Max quotes from Saul Bellow ’s English translation of Singer’s “Gimpel the Fool”: “I had seven names in all: imbecile, donkey, flax-head, dope, glump, ninny and fool.”
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  23. hearteningly
    • 2007 January 7, Sarah Saffian, “Seas of Emotion”, New York Times:
      Most hearteningly, Abraham is someone we come to care about: “At least an old man can reward himself with a tepid beer after enduring a long morning alone in his apartment.
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  24. hedgelike
    • 2007 January 7, Daniel Akst, “Outside the Hedge Funds, Looking In”, New York Times:
      In the short term, this may shut out the merely moderately rich, but it’s unlikely to stanch the flow of money into hedge funds or halt the gradual democratization of hedgelike vehicles.
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  25. huevos
  26. iconically
    • 2007 January 7, A. O. Scott, “Surrender and Survival in the Crucible of Battle”, New York Times:
      THE obvious novelty of Clint Eastwood ’s “Letters From Iwo Jima” is that this quintessentially — you might even say iconically — American filmmaker has made a World War II movie from the Japanese perspective.
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  27. industrializers
    • 2007 January 7, Stephen Kotkin, “Japan’s Retooling Is Distinctly Japanese”, New York Times:
      In 19th-century Japan, as well as in Germany, industrializers sought to avert the socialist inclinations of working classes by resorting to extreme repression or paternalism.
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  28. investable
    • 2007 January 7, Daniel Akst, “Outside the Hedge Funds, Looking In”, New York Times:
      (In the foreseeable future these will still be rich ones, assuming that the proposed new S.E.C. rule on investable assets takes effect.)
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  29. keeled
    • 2007 January 7, Deirdre Mcnamer, “They Came From Montana”, New York Times:
      Nefarious powers think his naïveté makes him the perfectly malleable replacement for his predecessor, who keeled over unexpectedly.
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  30. liftgates
    • 2007 January 7, Tim Moran, “Sliced, Diced and Polished to Perfection, Cutaway Displays Reveal All”, New York Times:
      Often, they work on a product for which there are no manuals yet. Mr. Tomlin’s group, for instance, created power sliding doors and liftgates as concept displays for Delphi, the auto parts supplier, years before the features were introduced on minivans and sport utility vehicles.
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  31. mathematicize
    • 2007 January 7, George Johnson, “Dancing With the Stars”, New York Times:
      But that’s Dyson: as resistant to categorization as the universe his colleagues are trying to mathematicize. “
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  32. maxillofacial
    • 2007 January 7, Lauren Collins, “Faces of War”, New York Times:
      Now, with “The Crimson Portrait,” she has traded the gumshoes of turn-of-the-last-century Vienna for the less hospitable milieu of maxillofacial surgeons in World War I Britain.
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  33. megatrends
    • 2007 January 7, Carole Gould, “Three Philosophies, Three Big Gains”, New York Times:
      To pick the fund’s 85 stocks, Mr. Coll aims to identify megatrends in the economy, then looks for industries and companies that might benefit from them.
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  34. merengue
  35. microcar
  36. midengine
    • 2007 January 7, Don Sherman, “When Dream Cars Collide With Real-World Demands”, New York Times:
      That experience prompted a series of nine midengine experimental and concept cars stretching from the CERV I (Chevrolet Engineering Research Vehicle) of 1960 through the CERV III (now Corporate Engineering Research Vehicle) of 1990.
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  37. midphrase
  38. minicamps
    • 2007 January 7, The Associated Press, “Bears Seeking Better Run in Playoffs”, New York Times:
      We had it going into minicamps, training camp, and I think the guys do think about that.”
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  39. multilevered
    • 2007 January 7, Tom Roston, “Natalie's Triumph”, New York Times:
      Natalie is game, and she takes the ball and puts it down the right hole of a multilevered contraption.
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  40. multipronged
    • 2007 January 7, Dave Itzkoff, “Genetic Park”, New York Times:
      The characters in this multipronged narrative who espouse the author’s beliefs are given ample opportunity to explain their viewpoints in calm, rational tones, while those who would dare to contradict him are depicted as sophists, plagiarists and charlatans or, worse still, trust-fund liberals who live in Northern California lofts and read Mother Jones magazine.
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  41. multiskilled
    • 2007 January 7, Anthony Tommasini, “A Prince on Flute and a Count on Guitar”, New York Times:
      As in his shattering staging of Mr. Sondheim and Hugh Wheeler’s “Sweeney Todd,” which had an acclaimed run on Broadway, Mr. Doyle has recruited a multiskilled cast of singers and actors who also play a variety of instruments.
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  42. neopopulist
    • 2007 January 7, Deirdre Mcnamer, “They Came From Montana”, New York Times:
      But only if one forgets that Mr. Tester is 50 years old, he’s seasoned in state politics, he ran a canny, gloves-off campaign, and he’s the kind of charismatic, hard-to-peg, Western neopopulist (like his friend, Gov. Brian Schweitzer of Montana) who might be, even now, redefining in certain far-reaching ways what it means to be a Democrat.
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  43. nonaversive
    • 2007 January 7, Maia Szalavitz, “Shocks From the System”, New York Times:
      According to the New York Department of Education, the state will be able to educate troubled children by 2009 with nonaversive measures.
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  44. nonboard
    • 2007 January 7, Jay Romano, “Barring Owners From Meetings”, New York Times:
      Mr. Jacobs contends that there may be sound reasons for barring nonboard members from meetings.
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  45. nondisabled
    • 2007 January 7, Lisa Chamberlain, “Design for Everyone, Disabled or Not”, New York Times:
      Mr. Baron hired Andrew Trivers, founding architect of Trivers Associates, to create a mixed-use environment for nondisabled people as well as people with a wide range of disabilities.
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  46. nondiscussion
    • 2007 January 7, Shalom Auslander, “Love Child”, New York Times:
      Farther up his rear end, the nondiscussion turned to environmentalism: Save the Earth!
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  47. nongame
    • 2007 January 7, “Letters to the Editor”, New York Times:
      The Monday night team in particular is so annoying with all the nongame chatter, you would think it was a talk show rather than a football game.
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  48. nonimperialistic
    • 2007 January 7, Shalom Auslander, “Love Child”, New York Times:
      Having passed Green Subaru, I floored it, but since I was already 20 minutes late anyway, I decided to stop a mile farther up the road at the local roadside organic pesticide-free grass-fed nonimperialistic fruit market to grab a quick cup of coffee.
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  49. nonnatives
    • 2007 January 7, Lanie Shapiro, “A Bagel-Shaped Hole on an Unexpected Strip”, New York Times:
      Now that the city is full of nonnatives, both behind the counter and waiting in line, Mr. Schwartz says, bagels “are made for Americans, not New Yorkers.”
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  50. nonwavering
    • 2007 January 7, Shalom Auslander, “Love Child”, New York Times:
      In matters of transportation, however, I am a lifelong, nonwavering, dyed-in-the-wool Move-Your-Butt-ocrat.
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  51. outperformance
    • 2007 January 7, Conrad De Aenlle, “Setting the Bar on Earnings”, New York Times:
      Smaller companies’ run of outperformance is looking long in the tooth after seven years, he said, and indications of softening economic conditions could steer investors toward the comparative safety that blue chips are thought to offer.
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  52. overreport
    • 2007 January 7, Daniel Gross, “A Phantom Rebound in the Housing Market”, New York Times:
      Just as the rising tide of cancellations leads the Census Bureau to overreport sales in the short term, it leads the government to underreport inventories.
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  53. parkside
    • 2007 January 7, Suzanne Slesin, “Park Vistas, With Produce”, New York Times:
      I learn I would be able to “shop along with the best chefs, indulge my inner gourmet, and enjoy the exhilaration and true spirit of parkside living, along with uptown elegance with a downtown edge.”
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  54. postproduction
    • 2007 January 7, Sharon Waxman, “She’s Producing as Fast as She Can”, New York Times:
      One suite is labeled “Academy Awards production office,” while postproduction on “Spider-Man 3” takes place elsewhere.
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  55. postscreening
    • 2007 January 7, Margy Rochlin, “Dry as Ever, Shrugging at Hollywood”, New York Times:
      The film also prompted an unusual response during the postscreening question-and-answer session.
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  56. prerevolutionary
    • 2007 January 7, Terrence Rafferty, “Living With Fidel”, New York Times:
      The book frames Carlos’s life, from his prerevolutionary bourgeois childhood through the first dozen years of the Castro era, as an exercise in “self-criticism” — the socialist equivalent of what Roman Catholics call “examination of conscience.”
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  57. prescore
    • 2007 January 7, Jon Burlingame, “Thinking in Colors and Textures, Then Writing in Music”, New York Times:
      That’s less the fault of composers than of directors, who commonly prescore their films with temporary music during editing, then frequently expect the final score to emulate that “temp track.”
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  58. preteenagers
    • 2007 January 7, Kelefa Sanneh, “Years in Review, and New-Year Surprises”, New York Times:
      In the first season of the British reality TV show “Rock Star” (which was broadcast in America on VH1), Gene Simmons of Kiss tried to turn a bunch of boarding-school preteenagers into a rock band.
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  59. privatizers
    • 2007 January 7, “A Chance to Save Social Security (3 Letters)”, New York Times:
      ” (editorial, Dec. 31): You are right in asserting that the failure of Chile’s privatized old-age security program should be a cautionary lesson for President Bush and other would-be privatizers of our Social Security system.
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  60. recrowned
  61. ristorantes
    • 2007 January 7, Julia Chaplin, “Breakfast Is Late, So Business Is Good”, New York Times:
      The scene at the European-style bistros and ristorantes is all about business and social networking, just as much as it is at lunch at a restaurant like Michael’s (popular with the publishing crowd), or at dinner at Phillipe (hip-hop moguls, fashion designers).
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  62. safarigoers
    • 2007 January 7, Elaine Glusac, “Hotel Décor: Where Fires Are Cool”, New York Times:
      Owners of the Keyah Grande Lodge (970-731-1160; www.keyahgrande.com ) in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado, say they were inspired by African fire rings around which safarigoers swap stories at the end of the day.
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  63. schmeared
    • 2007 January 7, Lanie Shapiro, “A Bagel-Shaped Hole on an Unexpected Strip”, New York Times:
      For the past five years, she and the man who is now her fiancé have walked the nearly four-mile round trip to Absolute Bagels on 107th Street and Broadway, in Morningside Heights, where since 1990 the bagels have been rolled, baked and schmeared by hand.
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  64. schoolers
    • 2007 January 7, Kate Zernike, “The Preteen: Betwixt and Bedeviled”, New York Times:
      To hear some parents tell it, one day their babies are innocent elementary schoolers in overalls, the next they’re dressing like Paris Hilton and simulating sex on the middle-school dance floor.
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  65. semifictional
    • 2007 January 7, Dan Shaw, “A House Museum That’s Part Serious and Part Sendup”, New York Times:
      HoMu existed on the Internet as a semifictional entity in the beginning,” said Mr. Noterdaeme, who was born in Brussels and who teaches courses like “From Van Eyck to Vermeer : Masterpieces of Netherlandish Art” at New York University .
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  66. showgoers
  67. signmaker
  68. softcover
    • 2007 January 7, William Safire, “Retronym”, New York Times:
      He was especially intrigued by the usage hardcover book, which was originally a plain book until softcover books came along, which were originally called paperback and now have spawned a version the size of a hardcover but with a soft cover trade-named with the retronym trade paperback.
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  69. soymilk
    • 2007 January 7, Elissa Schappell, “Exile on Sesame Street”, New York Times:
      Childless readers who fear the un-cooling effects of parenthood will be relieved to learn kids, born slam dancers, really dig the Ramones, and will be heartened to see that Pollack, despite drinking chai with soymilk and listening to NPR, hasn’t become Mr. Rogers in a Black Sabbath T-shirt.
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  70. stocklike
  71. stylization
  72. thumbholes
    • 2007 January 7, David Colman, “It’s Like Nothing, Really”, New York Times:
      The paint set is the top-of-the-line model, the Extra-Fine Oil Artist’s Box with a 39-tube spectrum of colors, 6 different painting mediums, 10 brushes (5 sable and 5 hog bristle), palette knives and a palette (with old-fashioned thumbholes), all in a portable walnut box.
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  73. ticketholders
    • 2007 January 7, Margy Rochlin, “Dry as Ever, Shrugging at Hollywood”, New York Times:
      For $50 ticketholders were invited to see “Little Miss Sunshine” and clips from past Arkin films, and to attend a question-and-answer session.
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  74. tripleheader
  75. underperformance
    • 2007 January 7, David Carr, “Eastwood Confounds Expectations, and Schedules”, New York Times:
      The original plan — rendered moot by the underperformance of “Flags of Our Fathers” — had been to release “Letters From Iwo Jima” on Feb. 9, 2007, into what was hoped would be another round of post-Oscar nomination buzz.
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  76. underrecognized
    • 2007 January 7, Carole Gould, “Three Philosophies, Three Big Gains”, New York Times:
      Because of these difficulties, he added, “its outstanding gold reserves were being underrecognized by the market.”
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  77. unorchestrated
    • 2007 January 7, Ron Stodghill, “The Doctor Is In”, New York Times:
      Although he has trotted out this particular DVD on countless occasions for hospital employees, visitors, reporters and others whom he is intent on winning over, Dr. Pardes says his emotions are real, his response unorchestrated.
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  78. untinged
    • 2007 January 7, Mary Jo Murphy, “A Slim Guidebook for Executing a Deposed Ruler”, New York Times:
      Mr. Abbott would not say which of the 70 ways might have suited Mr. Hussein, but if the idea is to “pay the penalty untinged by revenge,” then “I would say firing squad,” he said. “
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  79. unwasted

Sequestered[edit]

  1. dolling -> dolling up
    • 2007 January 7, Sylviane Gold, “Kate Winslet Vanishes Into Her Roles”, New York Times:
      She has mastered the role of glamorous yet gracious luminary, dolling up for the red carpet and dishing on the talk shows with what appears to be genuine relish.
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  2. gueuloir: not adopted into English; only used regarding Flaubert
    • 2007 January 7, Richard Powers, “How to Speak a Book”, New York Times:
      That’s why so many writers — like Flaubert, shouting his sentences in his gueuloir — test the rightness of their words out loud.
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  3. halfsies = go halfsies
  4. lexies = lexicographers
    • 2007 January 7, William Safire, “Retronym”, New York Times:
      The Merriam lexies, always strong on etymology, cite the earliest usage they can find of retronym in this column in 1980, which credited Frank Mankiewicz, then president of National Public Radio , as the coiner.
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  5. lollalollaloola
    • 2007 January 7, Tom Roston, “Natalie's Triumph”, New York Times:
      In the hallway I let Natalie climb out of the stroller, and despite my deft motions to keep her from seeing the lollalollaloola, she immediately burrows toward it.
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  6. paaplet: not adopted into English
    • 2007 January 7, Paul Gray, “Gangsta Raj”, New York Times:
      Those who plunge into the novel soon find themselves thrashing in a sea of words and sentences (“On Maganchand Road the thela-wallahs already had their fruit piled high, and the fishsellers were laying out bangda and bombil and paaplet on their slabs”) unencumbered by italics or explication.
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  7. unconsume: exists, but very rare (and inflections are misleading)
    • 2007 January 7, Rob Walker, “Unconsumption”, New York Times:
      As Freecycle has become a bigger and bigger de facto brand — Beal prefers “movement” — its sheer scale no doubt attracts people who aren’t tree-huggers or “simple living” fanatics but just have some item they’d like to unconsume and in the process see what all the fuss is about.
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