User:Visviva/NYT 20070114

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-01-14 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-01).

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175667 tokens ‧ 130298 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13206 types ‧ 123 (~ 0.931%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-01-14[edit]

  1. afterschool
    • 2007 January 14, Ben Schwartz, “See You in the (Restored, Reprinted) Funny Papers”, New York Times:
      None of which I’ll ever get back.” Mr. Matt, the graphic novelist best known for his absurdly self-centered autobiographical comic “Peepshow,” is sitting in a prefab booth at Daily Donut in Los Feliz, a neighborhood spot favored by quiet elderly customers and infrequent rushes of teenagers seeking afterschool snacks.
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  2. altissimo
    • 2007 January 14, Ben Ratliff, “Michael Brecker Dies at 57; Prolific Jazz Saxophonist”, New York Times:
      He could fold the full pitch range of the horn into a short solo, from altissimo to the lowest notes, and connect rarefied ideas to the rich, soulful phrasing of saxophonists like Junior Walker.
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  3. blockfront
    • 2007 January 14, Tracie Rozhon, “Designing a Starter Town House With a Twist”, New York Times:
      He had discovered that the house on Pulaski Street was one of perhaps a dozen “twin” buildings, built with the identical brick diamond-shaped ornament and twinned double windows on the second floor, stretching across the whole Nostrand Avenue blockfront and reaching down Pulaski.
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  4. bottomedness
    • 2007 January 14, Caroline Elkins, “A Life Exposed”, New York Times:
      She goes on to observe that “the obsession with Saartjie’s posterior, posterity and broad bottomedness, and the endless punning on rear ends, rumps, fundaments and fat arses became explicitly tied to the most pressing and topical political issues concerning the decline of King George, the rise of the Regency and which rumps would take over government.”
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  5. bowings
  6. calypsonians
    • 2007 January 14, Ben Ratliff, “If You’re Going to London, Nashville or San Francisco”, New York Times:
      The fourth and newest volume (subtitled “African Dreams and the Piccadilly High Life”) is scattered with calypsonians like Lord Kitchener, Young Growler and Young Tiger, and high-life bands like the African Messengers.
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  7. campuswide
    • 2007 January 14, Ralph Blumenthal, “A Discordant Chorus Questions Visions for a Bush Library at Southern Methodist”, New York Times:
      “According to George Bush’s closest associates, the half-billion-dollar endowment will be used by the institute to hire conservative scholars to agree to ‘write papers and books favorable to the president’s policies,’ ” said the letter calling for a campuswide dialogue on the affiliation.
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  8. cels
    • 2007 January 14, Elsa Brenner, “Art House to Get a Campus”, New York Times:
      The new modernistic-style building will have five classrooms, including a 55-seat master classroom for film and video projection; an animation room, where small sets can be built and cartoon cels created; three editing suites and a large open editing station; a recording studio with an isolation booth; a 1,000-square-foot soundstage; and workshop space for set designing.
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  9. chimings
  10. circumcisers
    • 2007 January 14, Tina Rosenberg, “A Real-World AIDS Vaccine?”, New York Times:
      Circumcision is a surgical procedure, however, and in the hands of traditional ritual circumcisers, it has a high rate of infection and mishap.
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  11. comped
    • 2007 January 14, Sara Dickerman, “Are You Being Served?”, New York Times:
      Nevertheless, he too knows the value of comped food, using kitchen freebies, heartfelt apologies and often a follow-up note, to turn inevitable restaurant snafus like soggy onion rings or an overly long wait into customer loyalty.
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  12. conquistadora
    • 2007 January 14, Maggie Galehouse, “Conquer and Convert”, New York Times:
      A work of historical fiction couldn’t ask for better bones than the adventures of a real-life conquistadora.
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  13. crepey
    • 2007 January 14, Henry Alford, “Books on Broadway”, New York Times:
      My fat cells went condo and my skin is all crepey.
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  14. demicelebrities
  15. didactism
    • 2007 January 14, Daniel Handler, “Children’s Books”, New York Times:
      Classics of children’s etiquette use didactism as a jumping-off point to deadpan absurdity — as in Sesyle Joslin and Maurice Sendak’s “What Do You Say, Dear?,” in which “No, thank you” is the proper answer to “Would you like me to shoot a hole in your head?”
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  16. divalike
    • 2007 January 14, Lola Ogunnaike, “TV Dramas Rip the Cover Off Magazines”, New York Times:
      No one even remembers the names of most of the me-too chick-lit novels starring divalike magazine editors.
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  17. dramaturg
  18. easternize
    • 2007 January 14, Liesl Schillinger, “Siberian Fields”, New York Times:
      It would suit me very well,” he tells her, “if, at this point, I could easternize your Western eyes, your Western heart.” n.
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  19. gobernadora
    • 2007 January 14, Maggie Galehouse, “Conquer and Convert”, New York Times:
      Not terribly conflicted by the part she must play, she seems beyond reproach, as effective and inscrutable in battle as she is as a gobernadora.
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  20. goji
    • 2007 January 14, Dan Levin, “Organic David, Organic Goliath”, New York Times:
      At the back of the Fourth Street Food Co-op, past the rotting floorboards, cardboard boxes of gold blush apples, and bins of green mung beans and dried mangoes, Dion Workman, a composer from Williamsburg, was pouring bags of goji berries into a new glass display jar.
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  21. gossamerlike
    • 2007 January 14, Jennifer Steinhauer, “L.A.’s Top Banana . . .”, New York Times:
      The popular Jin Patisserie in Venice serves a rarefied twist on the banana-cream pie, with caramel bananas and mascarpone cream set into a gossamerlike sponge cake topped with tiny dots of dark chocolate.
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  22. halfcourt
    • 2007 January 14, Pat Borzi, “Defense Falters and Nets Fade in Fourth Quarter”, New York Times:
      Garnett scored 6 of the points — a jumper that hit the rim, bounced high and through; a fast-break dunk after a Carter throwback pass to no one; and another dunk out of a halfcourt set.
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  23. hos
    • 2007 January 14, Henry Alford, “Books on Broadway”, New York Times:
      talkin’, talkin’ ’bout emperor’s children: ivy league pimps and hos.
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  24. hurrahed
    • 2007 January 14, Winnie Hu, “Equal Cheers for Boys and Girls Draw Some Boos”, New York Times:
      Boys’ basketball boosters say something is missing in the stands at away games, cheerleaders resent not being able to meet their rivals on the road, and even female basketball players being hurrahed are unhappy.
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  25. hyperaggressive
    • 2007 January 14, Norman J. Ornstein, “The House That Jack Built”, New York Times:
      Playing off his conservative, activist politics, his religious beliefs as an Orthodox Jew, his hyperaggressive approach to getting clients and his close relationships with Norquist, Reed and DeLay, Abramoff promised clients a direct link to the most powerful leaders in Congress and, subsequently, in the Bush White House.
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  26. landmarked
  27. lunchpail
    • 2007 January 14, Lynn Zinser, “Victory for Ortmeyer and the Rangers”, New York Times:
      Ortmeyer, a lunchpail forward who usually counts success in hits and blocked shots, was heading into his third season with the Rangers and was floored by the news.
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  28. magazineland
  29. melodramatizing
  30. melomakarona
  31. merlots
    • 2007 January 14, Brendan I. Koerner, “Thinking Outside the Cardboard”, New York Times:
      And American consumers seem to agree, judging by their growing thirst for merlots and chardonnays encased in cardboard.
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  32. midpriced
    • 2007 January 14, Shivani Vora, “Money Doesn’t Talk”, New York Times:
      But an informal survey of managers and salesclerks at 15 midpriced stores like Banana Republic and Ann Taylor indicates that customers of these stores like cash, too — sometimes for items less than a $100.
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  33. minicamp
    • 2007 January 14, The New York Times, “Mets Set to Add Sosa to Their Pitching Mix”, New York Times:
      General Manager Omar Minaya and Manager Willie Randolph made it clear this week at the Mets’ minicamp in Port St. Lucie, Fla., that the only two guaranteed spots in the Mets’ rotation belonged to Tom Glavine and Orlando Hernández .
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  34. misadvised
  35. mitzvahs
    • 2007 January 14, Daniel Handler, “Children’s Books”, New York Times:
      Then there are the books we all remember being given for our bar mitzvahs — or maybe that’s just me — that are little more than dashed-off lists of rules that in their utter disregard for the reader seem more of an example of rudeness than a step toward its extinction.
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  36. mohawks
  37. multitrack
    • 2007 January 14, Ben Ratliff, “Michael Brecker Dies at 57; Prolific Jazz Saxophonist”, New York Times:
      In the 1980s and 1990s he experimented with the electronic wind instrument called the EWI, which allowed him to blow through an electronic hornlike device, play a range of sampled sounds, and multitrack them in real time.
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  38. multitracked
  39. myelodysplastic
    • 2007 January 14, Ben Ratliff, “Michael Brecker Dies at 57; Prolific Jazz Saxophonist”, New York Times:
      His highest achievements were his own albums, both under his own name (starting in 1986) and with the Brecker Brothers band, as well as his early 80s work with the group Steps Ahead. Mr. Brecker was scheduled to tour with a reunited version of Steps Ahead in the summer of 2005 when his condition was publicly announced — initially as myelodysplastic syndrome, a bone-marrow disorder, which finally progressed to leukemia — and much of his work had to stop.
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  40. nonbaseball
  41. nonbusiness
    • 2007 January 14, Patrick Mcgeehan, “For Many, King’s Birthday Is Just Another Workday”, New York Times:
      But more than a third of those employers were nonbusiness entities, such as government agencies and nonprofits, the majority of which said they would observe the holiday.
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  42. noninfected
    • 2007 January 14, Lewis Beale, “A Variation on Vampire Lore That Won’t Die”, New York Times:
      As played by Will Smith , he is also one of the few noninfected characters in “I Am Legend,” a Warner Brothers production that has been shooting in New York for release in December.
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  43. nonkosher
    • 2007 January 14, Howard G. Goldberg, “A Tour of Israel, Bottle by Bottle”, New York Times:
      Admirers of Israel’s kosher and nonkosher wines need the 2007 edition of “Rogov’s Guide to Israeli Wines” (Toby Press, $19.95).
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  44. nonunionized
    • 2007 January 14, Rob Walker, “Biker Chic”, New York Times:
      It’s a nonunionized blue-collar job,” and many couriers are working-class dads with few other options, says Peter Sutherland, the director and photographer. “e.
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  45. onna
    • 2007 January 14, Richard Lourie, “Il Duce’s Architect”, New York Times:
      Besotted with the architect’s beautiful young daughter, he exclaims: “I’mma taste already, like roast pigeon, that neck onna my tongue.”
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  46. oppositional
    • 2007 January 14, Liesl Schillinger, “Siberian Fields”, New York Times:
      Writers seeking to capture the nature of Russia in one take have often favored grand oppositional schemes: “Crime and Punishment”; “War and Peace”; or, in the case of Woody Allen , “Love and Death.”
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  47. outhustled
  48. outperformance
    • 2007 January 14, Paul J. Lim, “When Those Blue Chips Aren’t Made in the U.S.A.”, New York Times:
      Arguably, much of the investor interest in foreign blue chips can be attributed to their outperformance, not to their similarities to their domestic counterparts.
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  49. overmedicating
    • 2007 January 14, Neil Genzlinger, “House of the Setting Sun”, New York Times:
      The uprising is moderately enjoyable as the inmates seize the asylum and deliver payback to the evil Alexandra and the doctor who has been overmedicating them all into complacency.
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  50. photobiography
    • 2007 January 14, Stephanie Deutsch, “Children’s Books”, New York Times:
      When Russell Freedman won the Newbery Medal for his photobiography of Abraham Lincoln in 1988, he rewarded himself with a trip to China.
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  51. piemakers
    • 2007 January 14, Jennifer Steinhauer, “L.A.’s Top Banana . . .”, New York Times:
      There are piemakers who embrace the standard whipped-cream topping, and others who meddle with meringue.
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  52. precapitalist
    • 2007 January 14, Robert Pinsky, “All Together Now”, New York Times:
      She aligns it with the old precolonial, precapitalist, pre-Christian religions, and with Carnival.
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  53. predeparture
    • 2007 January 14, Hilary Howard, “Comings and Goings”, New York Times:
      Scheduled so that participants will be able to visit Yosemite National Park during a full moon, the seven-day tour includes round-trip tickets aboard a vintage streamliner train (all meals and beverages included), a one-night predeparture stay in Oakland, two nights at the Ahwanhee or Yosemite Lodge and three nights of lodging, as well as dinner and a show, in San Francisco .
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  54. pushrod
    • 2007 January 14, Don Sherman, “Making Modern Horsepower the Old-Fashioned Way”, New York Times:
      The cam-within-a-cam concept has existed for decades, but perfecting it for production might just add another decade to the life of the pushrod engine.
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  55. pushrods
    • 2007 January 14, Don Sherman, “Making Modern Horsepower the Old-Fashioned Way”, New York Times:
      To fill the cylinders with the air and fuel needed to sustain high-speed operation, Detroit engine designers have packed larger intake ports into the space available between the pushrods.
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  56. reinterview
    • 2007 January 14, Duff Wilson, “Attorney General Agrees to Take Duke Case”, New York Times:
      Mr. Cooper said his office would obtain the case files next week and then meet with defense lawyers and reinterview witnesses, including the accuser.
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  57. sabras
    • 2007 January 14, Mary Pleshette Willis, “Mr. Fixit, Look What I Did”, New York Times:
      Then I learned in the army that I could beat all those sabras and Sephardic Jews twice my size by getting the top scores in electronics.”
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  58. salesroom
    • 2007 January 14, Christopher Gray, “A Centenarian With Starkly Youthful Looks”, New York Times:
      A 1910 Peerless brochure indicated that 250 employees worked there, and a cross section showed a double-height marble-paneled salesroom on the ground floor, with floors above for new cars, used cars, inspection, upholstery, repair, painting and, at the top, blacksmithing.
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  59. scaldings
  60. semiluxury
    • 2007 January 14, Shivani Vora, “Money Doesn’t Talk”, New York Times:
      Howard Davidowitz, who has studied consumer habits firsthand for decades, said that in the last three years he has seen more cash purchases at luxury boutiques like Louis Vuitton and semiluxury chains like Coach. Mr. Davidowitz, chairman of Davidowitz & Associates, a retail consulting firm, suspects now that $2,000 handbags and $700 shoes are commonplace, more women pay in fresh bills from the A.T.M. to cover their tracks.
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  61. seminaked
    • 2007 January 14, Caroline Elkins, “A Life Exposed”, New York Times:
      Baartman’s seminaked display left little to the imagination and reinforced England’s obsession with bottoms, both literally and figuratively.
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  62. semipros
  63. shawled
    • 2007 January 14, Caroline Elkins, “A Life Exposed”, New York Times:
      Properly top-hatted and shawled, men and women of Britain’s upper crust gawked at, prodded and squeezed these so-called human freaks, amusing themselves with the deformities that were paraded before them.
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  64. snowmaking
    • 2007 January 14, The Associated Press, “Sports Briefing”, New York Times:
      FREESTYLE EVENTS CANCELED Freestyle World Cup events scheduled for Jan. 19-20 in Lake Placid, N.Y., have been canceled because warm weather hindered snowmaking, the United States Ski and Snowboard Association and the International Ski Federation said.
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  65. soundstages
    • 2007 January 14, Dorothy Spears, “The Reel and the Real”, New York Times:
      Here’s the rub: The museum provided a fictionalized setting for the movie, but apart from an exterior shot of the museum’s facade and entrance, and an image of the sun rising over Central Park shot through an unspecified museum window, the movie was filmed on soundstages in and around Vancouver.
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  66. spaetzle
    • 2007 January 14, “The Latest New Wave”, New York Times:
      Current entrees include a grilled center-cut pork chop with fresh bacon, spaetzle and braised red cabbage.
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  67. streamliner
    • 2007 January 14, Hilary Howard, “Comings and Goings”, New York Times:
      Scheduled so that participants will be able to visit Yosemite National Park during a full moon, the seven-day tour includes round-trip tickets aboard a vintage streamliner train (all meals and beverages included), a one-night predeparture stay in Oakland, two nights at the Ahwanhee or Yosemite Lodge and three nights of lodging, as well as dinner and a show, in San Francisco .
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  68. streety
    • 2007 January 14, Rob Walker, “Biker Chic”, New York Times:
      The makers of a new DVD called “Mash SF” — full of streety stunts (and painful-looking crashes) in the manner of a skate video but with bikes — were recently recruited to contribute to the influential Japanese style Web site Honeyee.com .
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  69. stubbled
    • 2007 January 14, Jeff Vandam, “Lights, Camera, Honey Cookies: A Soap Opera, Greek Style”, New York Times:
      The crew assistants ferried coffee to higher-ups, and a stubbled young actor in a brown velvet blazer paced about, wearing an iPod. He had the magazine-ready looks of a soap opera actor, and that is what he was — the co-star of a Greek soap opera that chose this Greek-heavy neighborhood as its actual and on-screen location.
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  70. synthetics
    • 2007 January 14, Elsa Brenner, “Art House to Get a Campus”, New York Times:
      Only plastics and synthetics that cannot be recycled will end up in landfills, he said.
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  71. thrillerdom
    • 2007 January 14, William T. Vollmann, “Military Brats in Love”, New York Times:
      Exit A,” already crippled by this temporary union between dislikable Virginia and uninteresting Severin, now commits hari-kari by foisting on us a mind-bogglingly implausible stretch of thrillerdom: Virginia becomes part of a North Korean kidnapping ring! ݩ
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  72. timbering
    • 2007 January 14, Larry Rohter, “Brazil Gambles on Monitoring of Amazon Loggers”, New York Times:
      The architects of the plan say it will also help reduce tensions over land ownership in the Amazon, the world’s largest tropical forest, which loses an area the size of New Jersey every year to clear-cutting and timbering.
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  73. tintable
    • 2007 January 14, Jay Romano, “Shades and Windows Think for Themselves”, New York Times:
      John Van Dine, the chief executive of Sage Electrochromics in Faribault, Minn., a manufacturer of electronically tintable glass, said that with dynamic glazing, the heat of the sun never gets into the house in the first place.
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  74. tristesse
    • 2007 January 14, Liesl Schillinger, “Siberian Fields”, New York Times:
      The peculiar resonance of his postcoital tristesse, for example.” s.
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  75. ultraexpensive
    • 2007 January 14, Jennifer Conlin, “The Super Bowl Means Super-Size Hotel Rates”, New York Times:
      Even the ultraexpensive Setai is requiring guests to stay a minimum of seven nights during Super Bowl week, at $950 a night for a double room.
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  76. underexamined
    • 2007 January 14, Sara Dickerman, “Are You Being Served?”, New York Times:
      Wechsberg’s profile is a relative rarity: compared with the chef, who has inspired piles of confessionals and biographies, the great restaurant host is an underexamined creature.
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  77. unimpeachably
    • 2007 January 14, Ben Ratliff, “If You’re Going to London, Nashville or San Francisco”, New York Times:
      But these records (put out by the British label Honest Jon’s) are fascinating for their magically agreeable mixture of cultures in exile, and possibly because such unimpeachably beautiful “world music” comes with lyrics in the queen’s English.
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  78. unruined
    • 2007 January 14, Melena Ryzik, “Enough About You”, New York Times:
      The hosts, Susanne Bartsch, who wore a gold minidress, and Kenny Kenny, in a one-legged black body stocking, danced. Mr. Musto, unruined, watched from a couch.
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  79. unsliced
    • 2007 January 14, Jennifer Steinhauer, “L.A.’s Top Banana . . .”, New York Times:
      Some cannot stop themselves from embellishments — pecans, chocolate shavings, drizzles of caramel — and others feel compelled to place large chunks of unsliced bananas in their pies, forcing the involvement of a butter knife.
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  80. untowardly
    • 2007 January 14, Sara Dickerman, “Are You Being Served?”, New York Times:
      Perhaps that’s because discretion is a restaurateur’s asset — to dish untowardly would be bad for business.
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  81. uptowners
  82. valvetrain
    • 2007 January 14, Don Sherman, “Making Modern Horsepower the Old-Fashioned Way”, New York Times:
      Moving all the mechanical parts that open and close the valves to the top of the engine — thus eliminating the pushrods — yields a stiffer valvetrain that in turn makes it possible to spin the engine faster, a key to maximum power.
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  83. valvetrains
    • 2007 January 14, Don Sherman, “Making Modern Horsepower the Old-Fashioned Way”, New York Times:
      To coax their pushrod designs to rev higher without running out of breath, engineers have designed lighter, stiffer, lower-friction valvetrains.
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  84. veld
    • 2007 January 14, Caroline Elkins, “A Life Exposed”, New York Times:
      For Holmes, Baartman’s journey as an object of European curiosity and African exploitation began on the veld of South Africa’s Eastern Cape.
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  85. zippo
    • 2007 January 14, G. Pascal Zachary, “Out of Africa: Cotton and Cash”, New York Times:
      “The whole situation is magnificent news, especially when the problem has been zippo investment by large corporations in Africa,” says Robert H. Bates, an economist at Harvard and a specialist in African agriculture.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. cavapoo: too rare
    • 2007 January 14, Celia Barbour, “And Diggity Makes Three”, New York Times:
      The roommates even have a dog named Diggity — Diggy for short — a sociable cavapoo, which is a cross between a Cavalier King Charles spaniel and a poodle.
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  2. lima
    • 2007 January 14, Michael Kimmelman, “Giants of the Heartland”, New York Times:
      Or they’re abstract, in hollow shapes like lozenges or lima beans or dumplings — he calls them “Dangos,” which is Japanese for dumplings.
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  3. svelled
    • 2007 January 14, Henry Alford, “Books on Broadway”, New York Times:
      I once was svelte but now I have svelled.
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  4. walcum
    • 2007 January 14, Henry Alford, “Books on Broadway”, New York Times:
      Bonjour, mes amis; hello and walcum Newborns, zey love a leetle talcum.
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  5. wising
    • 2007 January 14, Marilyn Stasio, “Rookie Blues”, New York Times:
      I’m thinking of lone avengers like Michael Connelly’s aging homicide detective, Harry Bosch, bringing belated justice to a cold case he might have botched in “Echo Park,” as well as precinct-house saints like the Oracle, wising up the rookie cops in Joseph Wambaugh’s “Hollywood Station.”
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  6. woom
    • 2007 January 14, Henry Alford, “Books on Broadway”, New York Times:
      If you have woom in your womb Say hello to the bébé boom.
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  7. ze
    • 2007 January 14, Henry Alford, “Books on Broadway”, New York Times:
      But zere is no finer sweet, no finer muffin Than ze bun Maman makes in her own oven.
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  8. zere
    • 2007 January 14, Henry Alford, “Books on Broadway”, New York Times:
      But zere is no finer sweet, no finer muffin Than ze bun Maman makes in her own oven.
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  9. zey
    • 2007 January 14, Henry Alford, “Books on Broadway”, New York Times:
      Bonjour, mes amis; hello and walcum Newborns, zey love a leetle talcum.
      add
  10. gud
    • 2007 January 14, Henry Alford, “Books on Broadway”, New York Times:
      it’s rilly, rilly, rilly gud.
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  11. docosahexaenoic -> docosahexaenoic acid
  12. hyperkikes
    • 2007 January 14, Richard Lourie, “Il Duce’s Architect”, New York Times:
      By the kikes and the hyperkikes against the Not-sees.
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  13. magazinecentric
    • 2007 January 14, Lola Ogunnaike, “TV Dramas Rip the Cover Off Magazines”, New York Times:
      Much of the magazinecentric entertainment has been created by current and former magazine employees, who are following that old adage “write what you know.”
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  14. manypretty = many pretty
    • 2007 January 14, Chandra Prasad, “Passage From India”, New York Times:
      Even among my manypretty female cousins in India, bright and lovely Neet stood out.
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  15. eicosapentaenoic = eicosapentaenoic acid
    • 2007 January 14, Gary Rivlin, “Magical or Overrated? A Food Additive in a Swirl”, New York Times:
      They promote their products as cheaper, more magical elixirs that are superior to DHA because they also have a second important omega-3 called eicosapentaenoic acid, or EPA.
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  16. gevaltize: protologism
    • 2007 January 14, James Traub, “Does Abe Foxman Have an Anti-Anti-Semite Problem?”, New York Times:
      In certain precincts of the Jewish community, a person who insists that the sky is falling, despite ample evidence to the contrary, is said to gevaltize — a neologism derived from the famous Yiddish cry of shock or alarm.
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  17. gevalt: Yiddish word, doesn't appear to be English
  18. gevalthood: protologism
    • 2007 January 14, James Traub, “Does Abe Foxman Have an Anti-Anti-Semite Problem?”, New York Times:
      But in the world of Jewish leaders, one man stands alone in the annals of gevalthood — Abraham Foxman , director of the Anti-Defamation League and scourge of anti-Semites of high estate and low, in Hollywood and Tehran, on campus and in the tabloids.
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  19. lexies = lexicographers
    • 2007 January 14, William Safire, “Pushback”, New York Times:
      (To other lexies: quick, the door is closing!)
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  20. onlys = if onlys
    • 2007 January 14, David Colman, “Notes for a Soul Mate”, New York Times:
      AH, the sweet sound of personal regrets, of squandered talents, of if onlys, of what might have beens.
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  21. rilly = really
    • 2007 January 14, Henry Alford, “Books on Broadway”, New York Times:
      it’s rilly, rilly, rilly gud.
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  22. tombasil: really Tombasil, brand name for tombac/silicon alloy
    • 2007 January 14, Claire Wilson, “Celebrating a Chinese Heritage, With Nods to New York”, New York Times:
      An ebonized wooden double door, ornamented with a traditional Chinese moon motif in tombasil (white bronze), opens onto the main showroom, where Mr. Baird let the New York references speak for themselves.
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