User:Visviva/NYT 20070118

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
← Previous (2007-01-17) Words harvested from the New York Times, 2007-01-18
  • List status: open
→ Next (2007-01-19)

This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-01-18 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-01).

[ see all NYT pages ] - [ see all tracking lists ]

104975 tokens ‧ 77494 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 9422 types ‧ 49 (~ 0.52%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-01-18[edit]

  1. balletically
    • 2007 January 18, Roberta Smith, “The Museum as Outdoor Movie Screen”, New York Times:
      In rapidly syncopated, often synchronized sequences, we watch five great-looking characters — varying in age, sex, class and race — moving through a balletically compressed nocturnal workday, dusk to dawn, in about 14 minutes.
      add
  2. birdfeeders
    • 2007 January 18, Patricia Leigh Brown, “In Death as in Life, a Personalized Space”, New York Times:
      Although artist-designed urns and other objects are still a tiny fraction of the $11 billion death-care industry, as it is known, the gallery’s opening — along with novelty items like wind chimes with built-in cavities, pencils made from cremated remains (roughly 250 pencils per person), diamonds made from ash carbon and birdfeeders designed to scatter ashes — reflect the shifting demographics of death and disposition.
      add
  3. cannas
  4. counterjab
    • 2007 January 18, Damien Cave, “Iraqis Answer Global Critics by Tackling Troubling Issues”, New York Times:
      And he made a counterjab at the United States, saying that the failure to fully equip Iraqi troops had damaged efforts to bring peace to the country, and if the United States speeded up the process of giving Iraqi troops equipment and weapons, the need for American troops could be significantly reduced within three to six months.
      add
  5. everbearing
    • 2007 January 18, Anne Raver, “Is It Spring? Winter? What’s a Flower to Think?”, New York Times:
      I’m dreaming of Fresca strawberries, an everbearing variety that will produce fruit all summer, if I start the seeds 16 weeks before my last frost date (kitchengardenseeds.com ; (860) 567-6086).
      add
  6. exonerations
  7. flyaways
    • 2007 January 18, Marcelle S. Fischler, “Taming Frizz and Setting Curls Free”, New York Times:
      Consequently, there is a swell of hair care regimens, including serums, gels, balms, creams and sprays promising moisture-rich curls, without frizz or flyaways.
      add
  8. handgrip
  9. hatbands
    • 2007 January 18, David Colman, “Old Hat? Not on a Young Head”, New York Times:
      Popping in crimson, yellow, blue and white and tricked out with crystals, feathers and hatbands made of crocodile or contrasting ribbon, today’s fedoras would look at home on any villain in a ’70s Pam Grier movie — but executed with more finesse, and with a price tag to match — from $300 to $1,500.
      add
  10. impatiens
    • 2007 January 18, Leslie Land, “Garden Q.&A.”, New York Times:
      Plant reliable low-light performers: tuberous begonias, impatiens and fuchsias.
      add
  11. intraparty
    • 2007 January 18, Jennifer Medina, “Lieberman’s Party, but Someone Else’s Fight”, New York Times:
      On Wednesday, Mr. Korchin received a letter from a lawyer in the secretary of state’s office, stating that the state had “very limited jurisdiction” over intraparty battles, and was not taking a position over just who was in charge.
      add
  12. juried
    • 2007 January 18, Patricia Leigh Brown, “In Death as in Life, a Personalized Space”, New York Times:
      “Art and beauty can assuage anxiety,” said Maureen Lomasney, the 56-year-old artist and gallery owner, who started the concept with a Web site called Funeria, and sponsored a juried exhibition in Philadelphia last fall called “Ashes to Art,” a kind of Venice Biennale for the urn set.
      add
  13. leasable
  14. microfibers
  15. motoric
    • 2007 January 18, Anne Midgette, “The Virtuoso and the Star: A Study in Contrasts”, New York Times:
      Both men at least evince a burning desire for control: Toscanini’s expressed through relentless, even motoric rhythmic drive, Mr. Maazel’s by putting his orchestras through whatever paces his taut baton signals.
      add
  16. nonhospital
    • 2007 January 18, Andrew Ross Sorkin, “G.E. May Buy Abbott’s Diagnostic Unit”, New York Times:
      The Abbott product line would help G.E. add nursing homes and other nonhospital medical settings to its base, analysts said.
      add
  17. operagoers
    • 2007 January 18, Anne Midgette, “The Virtuoso and the Star: A Study in Contrasts”, New York Times:
      Before that came another comparison, although a tacit one: between Renée Fleming , who was scheduled to sing, and René Pape, the German bass who has become something of a darling to New York operagoers, who replaced her at short notice.
      add
  18. patinated
    • 2007 January 18, Patricia Leigh Brown, “In Death as in Life, a Personalized Space”, New York Times:
      Lamont Langworthy, a 76-year-old architect in Sebastopol, purchased a patinated copper urn with a “Zen feeling” from Ms. Lomasney, in which he said his own ashes will eventually be housed.
      add
  19. postconcussive
    • 2007 January 18, Alan Schwarz, “Expert Ties Ex-Player’s Suicide to Brain Damage”, New York Times:
      Because he was coincidentally situated in Pittsburgh, he had examined the brains of two former Pittsburgh Steelers players who were discovered to have had postconcussive brain dysfunction: Mike Webster, who became homeless and cognitively impaired before dying of heart failure in 2002; and Terry Long, who committed suicide in 2005.
      add
  20. pouffy
  21. rainfalls
  22. reorg
  23. salves
    • 2007 January 18, Mike Albo, “Grand Old Apothecary, Version 2.0”, New York Times:
      But over all, Kiehl’s satisfies a lot of fantasies you didn’t really know you had about pharmacies — those desires for old-fashioned liniments and salves you harbor from childhood, when you played store in the backyard or watched “Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman.”
      add
  24. salvias
  25. scaffoldings
    • 2007 January 18, Roberta Smith, “The Museum as Outdoor Movie Screen”, New York Times:
      Mondrian’s scaffoldings, Josef Albers’s squares and Ellsworth Kelly ’s looming geometries all come to mind.
      add
  26. shoaling
  27. sideliners
    • 2007 January 18, Abby Ellin, “Hard, Easy or Just Right?”, New York Times:
      It’s a bold statement (not to mention a cliché), but Mr. Cardiello, who created this high-energy workout to bring football to sideliners, isn’t afraid to be bold: he is a private trainer for N.F.L. players and former conditioning coach in the Arena Football League.
      add
  28. sleighful
    • 2007 January 18, Michelle Slatalla, “Rooting Around Grandma’s Basement in Cyberspace”, New York Times:
      By the end of December I was the delighted recipient of a sleighful of iced sugar cookies, bottles of Champagne and tiny Christmas tree ornaments (the one shaped like a bird was a regift, but still adorable).
      add
  29. soilless
    • 2007 January 18, Leslie Land, “Garden Q.&A.”, New York Times:
      After frost danger is past, fill the containers with a soilless planting medium like Pro-mix.
      add
  30. sportily
    • 2007 January 18, Jennifer Dunning, “Balanchine and Stravinsky, Reunited”, New York Times:
      Harshly astringent at times, sportily athletic at others, the tightly knit “Agon” includes one of the most eerily intense and sensuous of pas de deux, danced on Tuesday by Wendy Whelan and Albert Evans.
      add
  31. supersecret
    • 2007 January 18, David M. Halbfinger, “Hollywood Rethinks Its Ratings Process”, New York Times:
      The changes come a year after a Sundance film, “This Film Is Not Yet Rated,” excoriated the rating system as a supersecret star chamber.
      add
  32. topstitching
    • 2007 January 18, Eric Wilson, “Making Money in Multiples”, New York Times:
      Like the Luella Bartley and Behnaz Sarafpour collections that have been sold at Target, the Proenza Schouler line could be described as representing the best of their past hits: a palm print skirt for $24.99, a hooded cotton anorak for $39.99, a silk camisole with trapunto topstitching for $49.99.
      add
  33. trapunto
    • 2007 January 18, Eric Wilson, “Making Money in Multiples”, New York Times:
      Like the Luella Bartley and Behnaz Sarafpour collections that have been sold at Target, the Proenza Schouler line could be described as representing the best of their past hits: a palm print skirt for $24.99, a hooded cotton anorak for $39.99, a silk camisole with trapunto topstitching for $49.99.
      add
  34. unattributed
    • 2007 January 18, Jennifer 8. Lee, “A Mobile Work of Art Is Missing an Ironworker”, New York Times:
      The sculpture is a life-size depiction of the unattributed 1932 photograph, which shows a group of 11 ironworkers above the Rockefeller Center construction site.
      add
  35. uncontacted
  36. wigwamlike

Sequestered[edit]

  1. archivideo
    • 2007 January 18, Roberta Smith, “The Museum as Outdoor Movie Screen”, New York Times:
      Now available for viewing at, or more accurately on, the Museum of Modern Art, it is an outstanding example of what might be called archivideo or videotecture.
      add
  2. pigz: see pig and -z
  3. shodokan
    • 2007 January 18, Abby Ellin, “Street Kata”, New York Times:
      This class blends elements from tae kwon do, shodokan aikido, capoeira and tai chi with serious dance moves.
      add
  4. ultraducky
    • 2007 January 18, Eric Wilson, “Making Money in Multiples”, New York Times:
      “Obviously, it’s cash,” said Jack McCollough, half of the designing duo behind the ultraducky label Proenza Schouler, which Target will begin selling next month.
      add
  5. videotecture
    • 2007 January 18, Roberta Smith, “The Museum as Outdoor Movie Screen”, New York Times:
      Now available for viewing at, or more accurately on, the Museum of Modern Art, it is an outstanding example of what might be called archivideo or videotecture.
      add