User:Visviva/NYT 20070120

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-01-20 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-01).

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75246 tokens ‧ 55231 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 7400 types ‧ 27 (~ 0.365%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-01-20[edit]

  1. antisatellite
    • 2007 January 20, Joseph Kahn, “China Shows Assertiveness in Weapons Test”, New York Times:
      The test of an antisatellite weapon last week, which Beijing declined to confirm or deny Friday despite widespread news coverage and diplomatic inquiries, was perceived by East Asia experts as China’s most provocative military action since it testfired missiles off the coast of Taiwan more than a decade ago.
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  2. clopidogrel
    • 2007 January 20, Stephanie Saul, “Patent Trial Near, Bristol-Myers Counts on Resilience”, New York Times:
      Mr. Cornelius said yesterday that the market for blood thinners was still working through the remaining inventory of Apotex’s drug, clopidogrel bisulfate, but that more than half of prescriptions were now being filled with the Bristol-Myers product, and its share was growing steadily.
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  3. converso
    • 2007 January 20, Sam Roberts, “New Favor for a Name That Straddles Cultures”, New York Times:
      Guillermina Jasso, a sociology professor at New York University , said Angel was “evocative of the old converso practice of taking on very Christian surnames as a way of survival in a suspicious environment.
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  4. fanfest
  5. fearsomeness
    • 2007 January 20, Ginia Bellafante, “A Final Adventure for the Consummate Animal Hunter”, New York Times:
      Of all the naturalists to choose to make a victim! Mr. Irwin, of course, had gained celebrity engaging with unwieldy and lethal reptiles as if they were, on a scale of fearsomeness, roughly equivalent to a table of society matrons at tea.
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  6. headwall
  7. horseracing
    • 2007 January 20, Michael Cooper, “Candidates for State Comptroller Line Up”, New York Times:
      But his bid could face difficulty because he is a member of one of the groups bidding for the state’s valuable horseracing franchise.
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  8. nonobviousness
    • 2007 January 20, Stephanie Saul, “Patent Trial Near, Bristol-Myers Counts on Resilience”, New York Times:
      “If KSR raises the bar for nonobviousness, Judge Stein may need to rethink his conclusion that the Plavix patent is not obvious,” said C. Scott Hemphill, an associate professor of law at Columbia University .
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  9. norbolethone
    • 2007 January 20, The Associated Press, “Runner-Up in Tour Faces Drug Inquiry”, New York Times:
      Thomas was barred from cycling for life in August 2002 after testing positive for the performance-enhancing drug norbolethone.
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  10. outraise
  11. prescreened
  12. ruminatively
    • 2007 January 20, Anthony Tommasini, “Muti Takes the Reins, a Classicist at His Core”, New York Times:
      But who could not have been captivated by the passages of ecstatic murmurings; shimmering, unhinged harmonies; ruminatively Wagnerian lyricism?
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  13. schmos
    • 2007 January 20, Conrad De Aenlle, “Figuring Out the P.E. Ratio of Steve Jobs”, New York Times:
      It takes complicated individuals to build simple products, and Apple’s offices and labs are filled with designers and engineers who are anything but average schmos, Mr. Kaiser said.
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  14. testfired
    • 2007 January 20, Joseph Kahn, “China Shows Assertiveness in Weapons Test”, New York Times:
      The test of an antisatellite weapon last week, which Beijing declined to confirm or deny Friday despite widespread news coverage and diplomatic inquiries, was perceived by East Asia experts as China’s most provocative military action since it testfired missiles off the coast of Taiwan more than a decade ago.
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  15. trendsetting
    • 2007 January 20, The Associated Press, “Motorola Plans to Cut 5% of Work Force”, New York Times:
      He dismissed suggestions that the trendsetting Razr phone, which turned around the company’s fortunes two years ago, is running out of momentum.
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  16. trickledown
    • 2007 January 20, Katie Zezima, “Warm Days and Hard Times in Snowmobile Land”, New York Times:
      It has a huge trickledown effect,” said Mr. Cost, who had to lay off four employees because business was slow this year and last.
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  17. unbundling
    • 2007 January 20, Alina Tugend, “You, Too, Can Be an Energy Trader Right in Your Heated Home”, New York Times:
      Now, with what is known as unbundling, or separating the various services, private energy service companies buy the gas from somewhere, Texas or Louisiana, for example, then pipe it interstate to the utilities’ pipeline system.
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  18. wraithlike
    • 2007 January 20, Matt Zoller Seitz, “Easy Does It, the Next Stop Is a Killer. No, It Really Is.”, New York Times:
      In the original, Rutger Hauer ’s lip-smacking baddie was Satan with a driver’s license. Mr. Bean’s version plays like the murderous hero of “Crime and Punishment” reimagined as a wraithlike stalker.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. otherwordly = otherworldly
  2. popomo
    • 2007 January 20, Verlyn Klinkenborg, “‘Post-’”, New York Times:
      We are, of course, no longer postmodern but post-postmodern, if not in fact post-post-postmodern, which would make us not pomo, but popomo.
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  3. scarlot
    • 2007 January 20, Dinitia Smith, “In a Teenager’s Plight, the Forgotten History of the ‘Charity Girls’”, New York Times:
      In Nancy K. Bristow’s book, “Making Men Moral: Social Engineering During the Great War,” she quotes a petition from the Ministerial Association and Christian Endeavor Convention, to Woodrow Wilson: “Keep our boys clean; not only from the ravages of the liquor traffic, but the scarlot (sic) woman as well.”
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