User:Visviva/NYT 20070127

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-01-27 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-01).

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82789 tokens ‧ 60868 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 8306 types ‧ 40 (~ 0.482%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-01-27[edit]

  1. breadlike
    • 2007 January 27, Dennis Hevesi, “Carlos Lezama, 83, Dies; Shaped West Indian Parade”, New York Times:
      Along the sidewalks, hundreds of vendors hawked everything from commemorative T-shirts to rum to roti, the breadlike Caribbean pastry stuffed with pungently barbecued goat or chicken.
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  2. buffo
    • 2007 January 27, Vivien Schweitzer, “Young Lovers, a Vespa and a Frolic by Rossini”, New York Times:
      Signor Bruschino was updated from a generic buffo character to an oily, scholarly-looking, suit-clad neurotic, excellently acted and sung by Marco Nistico.
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  3. charismatically
    • 2007 January 27, Ben Ratliff, “A Saxophonist Known for New Ideas Meets an Organist From the Old School”, New York Times:
      She allowed a lot of open space into her playing, and she transferred some of the organ’s inherent drama to the piano: she presented ideas one after the other, sequentially and charismatically, swelling and quieting. Mr. Osby picked around the famous melody subversively, running parallel to Ms. Pitts, taking wide harmonic routes around the horn without going dissonant.
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  4. chipmaking
    • 2007 January 27, John Markoff, “Intel Says Chips Will Run Faster, Using Less Power”, New York Times:
      A front-page article on Saturday about a breakthrough by Intel in chipmaking misidentified the site of a vast automated factory where the development effort took place.
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  5. crudities
    • 2007 January 27, Bernard Holland, “Chinese Pipa Joins Russian Strings”, New York Times:
      Syncopation and bluesy distortions hear America acutely while softening the intentional crudities.
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  6. duckwalking
    • 2007 January 27, Jon Pareles, “A Rocker Who’s Come to Terms With Time”, New York Times:
      Important members of his Silver Bullet Band — Alto Reed on saxophones, Chris Campbell on bass, Craig Frost on keyboards — have been with him for decades. Mr. Seger was never the most athletic performer, but he still pumps his fist to the beat. Mr. Reed takes care of the showboating, trucking and duckwalking with instruments as hefty as a bass saxophone.
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  7. fulltime
    • 2007 January 27, Eric Konigsberg, “On Your Toes, Blokes, 2 Highnesses Coming — Charles and Camilla”, New York Times:
      Rufus Albemarle — the 10th Earl of Albemarle, not to mention a fulltime resident of Chelsea (the one in New York, not London) and an entrepreneur who is soon to launch a new line of men’s dress shirts — also chose to focus on the prince’s agricultural experiment.
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  8. hechsherim
    • 2007 January 27, Jennifer Medina, “Porn Filmmaker Finds Out a ‘K’ Can Be Owned”, New York Times:
      Those who observe Jewish dietary laws consider any food lacking one of a handful of such symbols, known as hechsherim, as treif, or unkosher.
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  9. horseface
    • 2007 January 27, Eric Konigsberg, “On Your Toes, Blokes, 2 Highnesses Coming — Charles and Camilla”, New York Times:
      During that trip, in early November 2005, The New York Post ridiculed Charles for failing to make eye contact with his wife throughout a 9/11 memorial event in Lower Manhattan (“maybe they’ve just grown accustomed to sneaking around”); and in The Washington Post, Tina Brown , ostensibly praising Camilla, wrote: “She’s smaller, prettier, more delicate than all those cruel horseface snaps would have you believe.”
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  10. hyperconsumerism
    • 2007 January 27, Melena Ryzik, “A New Wave Now Knits for the Rebellion of It”, New York Times:
      Jean Railla, the author of “Get Crafty: Hip Home Ec” (Broadway Books, 2004) and founder of GetCrafty.com, agreed: “In a world of thousand-dollar ‘it’ bags, and hyperconsumerism, one of the most political things you can do is to make something yourself.”
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  11. liedlike
    • 2007 January 27, Anne Midgette, “Operetta and Weill in Front; Moving Shadows in Back”, New York Times:
      In the program of “exiled” composers, Elisabeth Flechl and Johannes Föttinger belied the notion that native specialists bring more insight or liedlike subtlety to operetta by simply pumping out one number after another until their voices were spent.
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  12. microexpressions
    • 2007 January 27, Craig S. Smith, “Romania’s King Without a Throne Outlives Foes and Setbacks”, New York Times:
      “It is very, very difficult for your side of the world to understand what happens in this part of the world,” he said with a wry twist of his mouth and an infinitesimal shrug, one of the many almost whimsical microexpressions that play over the old king’s otherwise placid features as he speaks.
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  13. miniboom
    • 2007 January 27, Harry Hurt Iii, “Sgt. Preston, Where Are You? Dog Sledding Isn’t Easy”, New York Times:
      Though hardly as popular as skiing or snowboarding, the sport is currently enjoying a miniboom in northern states like Vermont, Maine, Minnesota, Montana and Idaho, and in Canada, Norway, Mongolia, South Korea and Japan.
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  14. multihued
    • 2007 January 27, Dennis Hevesi, “Carlos Lezama, 83, Dies; Shaped West Indian Parade”, New York Times:
      Enticed by the dueling rhythms of reggae, calypso and steel-drum music, marchers — if you could call them that — pranced in grass skirts, leopard-skin warrior costumes and the multihued wings of butterflies.
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  15. noncash
  16. overbright
    • 2007 January 27, Anne Midgette, “Operetta and Weill in Front; Moving Shadows in Back”, New York Times:
      Operetta is tricky: potentially as sparkling and sophisticated as Champagne, it is often produced today as a kind of Kool-Aid punch, overbright and oversweet and with very little appeal to a discriminating audience.
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  17. overregulation
  18. oversweet
    • 2007 January 27, Anne Midgette, “Operetta and Weill in Front; Moving Shadows in Back”, New York Times:
      Operetta is tricky: potentially as sparkling and sophisticated as Champagne, it is often produced today as a kind of Kool-Aid punch, overbright and oversweet and with very little appeal to a discriminating audience.
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  19. pimlock
  20. ppg
  21. ranibizumab
  22. roti
    • 2007 January 27, Dennis Hevesi, “Carlos Lezama, 83, Dies; Shaped West Indian Parade”, New York Times:
      Along the sidewalks, hundreds of vendors hawked everything from commemorative T-shirts to rum to roti, the breadlike Caribbean pastry stuffed with pungently barbecued goat or chicken.
      add
  23. salchow
    • 2007 January 27, Lynn Zinser, “Sights Set on Title, Meissner Is All Smiles”, New York Times:
      Naomi Nari Nam and Themi Leftheris had a chance to grab a world team spot after Inoue and Baldwin stumbled, but Nam fell to a knee trying to land a throw triple salchow and also fell on the next throw, a triple loop.
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  24. signees
    • 2007 January 27, Thayer Evans, “At Rice, a Scorer’s Patience Is Starting to Pay Off”, New York Times:
      After playing on the Georgia Stars, an A.A.U. team that featured eight N.C.A.A. Division I signees, and also playing with Atlanta Hawks forward Josh Smith at McEachern High School in Powder Springs, Ga., Almond expected to make an immediate impact at Rice.
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  25. sinuousness
    • 2007 January 27, Roslyn Sulcas, “Finding a Famous Pair’s Intensity and Sensitivity”, New York Times:
      Andrew Veyette gave a lovely sinuousness to his “Sarabande” solo, and Ellen Bar was coolly seductive in her “Bransle Gay” solo and the subsequent pas de trois, balancing unworriedly in arabesque as her two partners switched sides.
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  26. skicross
  27. skijorers
  28. smashingly
    • 2007 January 27, Eric Konigsberg, “On Your Toes, Blokes, 2 Highnesses Coming — Charles and Camilla”, New York Times:
      It has been just over a year since their Wellington boots last sloshed about on these shores, and it’s not as though that trip — billed as their first official overseas tour since being married in April 2005 — came off so smashingly that they, or an adoring American public, ought to be crying out for another.
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  29. superexpressive
  30. undercroft
    • 2007 January 27, Tina Kelley, “Episcopal Leader Taking Over Newark’s Flock”, New York Times:
      Newcomers to Episcopal churches are often confused, he said, by crossword puzzle words used on Sundays like chancel, narthex and undercroft; his former congregation provided a glossary for unfamiliar terms or avoided them.
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  31. unfrumpiness
    • 2007 January 27, Martha Schwendener, “Flair and Flash, Not Frumpiness”, New York Times:
      Time then for an exhibition celebrating the unfrumpiness of craft, and, sigh, what better institution than one that recently went through its own makeover, changing its name from the American Craft Museum to the sexier Museum of Arts & Design?
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  32. unkosher
    • 2007 January 27, Jennifer Medina, “Porn Filmmaker Finds Out a ‘K’ Can Be Owned”, New York Times:
      Those who observe Jewish dietary laws consider any food lacking one of a handful of such symbols, known as hechsherim, as treif, or unkosher.
      add
  33. untrendy
  34. unworriedly
    • 2007 January 27, Roslyn Sulcas, “Finding a Famous Pair’s Intensity and Sensitivity”, New York Times:
      Andrew Veyette gave a lovely sinuousness to his “Sarabande” solo, and Ellen Bar was coolly seductive in her “Bransle Gay” solo and the subsequent pas de trois, balancing unworriedly in arabesque as her two partners switched sides.
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. largemouth
  2. pasttime = pastime
    • 2007 January 27, Alan Riding, “Art From Russia With Love (C’est Français, Naturellement)”, New York Times:
      London, then, might offer the most receptive audience for “The Triumph of Eros: Art and Seduction in 18th-Century France,” a show that demonstrates through paintings, engravings and sculptures how the French turned loving into an amusing pasttime.
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