User:Visviva/NYT 20070206

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-02-06 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-01).

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98024 tokens ‧ 72650 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 8891 types ‧ 45 (~ 0.506%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-02-06[edit]

  1. anticapitalist
    • 2007 February 6, Jesse Mckinley, “Jail Record Near for Videographer Who Resisted Grand Jury”, New York Times:
      Mr. Wolf, 24, has been in prison since August, with a brief break in September related to his appeal, after refusing to cooperate with a grand jury investigation of an anticapitalist protest in 2005 in which a police officer here was injured and a squad car was slightly damaged by a small explosive device.
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  2. anticompetitive
    • 2007 February 6, The Associated Press, “F.T.C. Reaffirms Rambus Antitrust Ruling”, New York Times:
      The order said Rambus violated federal antitrust laws “by deliberately engaging in a pattern of anticompetitive acts to deceive an industrywide standard-setting organization.”
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  3. antimarket
  4. antisatellite
    • 2007 February 6, William J. Broad, “Orbiting Junk, Once a Nuisance, Is Now a Threat”, New York Times:
      Now, experts say, China’s test on Jan. 11 of an antisatellite rocket that shattered an old satellite into hundreds of large fragments means the chain reaction will most likely start sooner.
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  5. arepas
    • 2007 February 6, Nina Bernstein, “Immigrant Entrepreneurs Shape a New Economy”, New York Times:
      Today Mr. Miranda, 32, runs a family business with 16 employees, producing 10 million arepas a year in the Maspeth section of Queens.
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  6. avoidant
    • 2007 February 6, Benedict Carey, “In Rigorous Test, Talk Therapy Works for Panic Disorder”, New York Times:
      In an analysis of individual patient’s responses, the researchers found that those who also had a personality disorder, like avoidant personality, showed significantly greater improvement than those whose symptoms were related solely to anxiety.
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  7. countywide
  8. crewmember
    • 2007 February 6, Joe Sharkey, “Virtual Hostages on a Plane”, New York Times:
      It was a holiday period, and most domestic airlines had every available crewmember and plane in operation.
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  9. deindustrializing
  10. falda
    • 2007 February 6, Ben Ratliff, “Embodying the Past and Future of an Old Form”, New York Times:
      Saturday’s show had no intermission, but fell into two obvious parts. Ms. Morente charged onstage in a black suit with a jacket and a traditional black falda skirt; imperiously, she ratcheted herself into a chair.
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  11. foreseeability
  12. handclapping
    • 2007 February 6, Ben Ratliff, “Embodying the Past and Future of an Old Form”, New York Times:
      The daughter of the remarkable cantaor Enrique Morente — himself an innovator, when he wants to be — she has grown up inside its tradition; at Town Hall on Saturday night, she performed in an ensemble that included one uncle (José Carbonell) on guitar, and another (Antonio Carbonell) accompanying her with palmas, or handclapping.
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  13. handclaps
    • 2007 February 6, Ben Ratliff, “Embodying the Past and Future of an Old Form”, New York Times:
      Fitted with a strong three-beat rhythm, guitar and handclaps, it was a great piece of cultural transformation, and she worked stealthily, placing her lines inside the tensions of Mr. Carbonell’s guitar rhythm.
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  14. hoistway
    • 2007 February 6, Thomas J. Lueck, “3 Deaths May Put Focus on Elevators’ Hardware”, New York Times:
      In the intervening hours, the building’s three elevators continued to function normally, even though building engineers were called to the 11th floor on Sunday morning after residents discovered that one hoistway door had been pushed off its tracks.
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  15. insulas
  16. judgeships
  17. karkaba
    • 2007 February 6, Steve Smith, “From Single Notes, a Spectrum of Sound”, New York Times:
      Three percussionists provided driving rhythms on hand drums, shakers and clacking karkaba, over which Haale’s warm, supple voice unfurled like a curlicue of smoke.
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  18. lightwaves
    • 2007 February 6, Natalie Angier, “How Do We See Red? Count the Ways”, New York Times:
      Cones manage their magic in computational teams of three types, each tuned to a slightly different slice of the electromagnetic spectrum, the sweeping sum of lightwaves that streams from the sun.
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  19. lipsticked
    • 2007 February 6, Natalie Angier, “How Do We See Red? Count the Ways”, New York Times:
      Red is bright and bold and has a big lipsticked mouth, through which it happily speaks out of all sides at once.
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  20. meringuelike
    • 2007 February 6, Cathy Horyn, “Young Spirits, One of Them an Old Master”, New York Times:
      A contributing factor to this slightly regressive femininity may have been the sugary fabrics (silver lamé, tulle over sequins) and the meringuelike puffs and baby Googums bows at the neck.
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  21. midconcert
  22. mischiefmaking
  23. mudless
  24. multichromatic
    • 2007 February 6, Natalie Angier, “How Do We See Red? Count the Ways”, New York Times:
      Whatever the primary spur to the evolution of our rose-colored retinas, we, like most other animals with multichromatic vision, have learned to treat red with respect.
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  25. multigame
  26. nondetrimental
  27. nonsplattering
    • 2007 February 6, Felicia R. Lee, “Reclaiming a Black Research Scientist’s Forgotten Legacy”, New York Times:
      After almost two decades at the Glidden company, where his research made possible a fire-retardant foam widely used in World War II and the mass production of synthetic progesterone, the company told him to concentrate on things like nonsplattering shortening.
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  28. nonsuspense
    • 2007 February 6, Dave Kehr, “New DVDs: Cinema Classics”, New York Times:
      But the real Hitchcock fan will also be intrigued by the atypical, nonsuspense films that Hitchcock directed before his brand name had completely come together.
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  29. osetra
    • 2007 February 6, Felicity Barringer, “U.N. Lifts Ban on Beluga Caviar, Overruling Environmentalists”, New York Times:
      The agency’s decision does not change the situation in the United States, which banned the import or interstate transport of both beluga caviar and its slightly less lofty cousins, sevruga and osetra, in the fall of 2005.
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  30. overfinanced
    • 2007 February 6, Steven Rattner, “Fudging the Budget”, New York Times:
      Just two weeks ago, the consulting firm Towers Perrin reported that at the end of 2006, the pension funds of the Fortune 100 companies were actually overfinanced.
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  31. palmas
    • 2007 February 6, Ben Ratliff, “Embodying the Past and Future of an Old Form”, New York Times:
      The daughter of the remarkable cantaor Enrique Morente — himself an innovator, when he wants to be — she has grown up inside its tradition; at Town Hall on Saturday night, she performed in an ensemble that included one uncle (José Carbonell) on guitar, and another (Antonio Carbonell) accompanying her with palmas, or handclapping.
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  32. posto
  33. postos
    • 2007 February 6, Larry Rohter, “Drawing Lines Across the Sand, Between Classes”, New York Times:
      Even the city’s most elite beaches, Ipanema and Copacabana, and their lesser-known extensions, Leblon and Leme, are informally subdivided into sectors, demarcated by a dozen lifeguard stations called postos, each about a half-mile from the next.
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  34. saltarello
    • 2007 February 6, Steve Smith, “From Single Notes, a Spectrum of Sound”, New York Times:
      While playing an anonymous Renaissance saltarello arranged by the percussionist Payton MacDonald, the musicians marched and danced evocatively.
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  35. sashed
  36. sevruga
    • 2007 February 6, Felicity Barringer, “U.N. Lifts Ban on Beluga Caviar, Overruling Environmentalists”, New York Times:
      The agency’s decision does not change the situation in the United States, which banned the import or interstate transport of both beluga caviar and its slightly less lofty cousins, sevruga and osetra, in the fall of 2005.
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  37. silkscreened
    • 2007 February 6, Martha Schwendener, “Believers and Doubters, Inspired by the Word”, New York Times:
      The wall text accompanying Warhol’s small canvas with 12 electric-blue crucifixes silkscreened on a black background suggests that the repetition of crosses mirrors his Campbell’s soup cans, with the religious icon serving as “a commodity to be bought and sold.”
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  38. stewpot
    • 2007 February 6, Michiko Kakutani, “Dispatch From Gomorrah, Savaging the Cultural Left”, New York Times:
      It’s a nasty stewpot of intellectually untenable premises and irresponsible speculation that frequently reads like a “Saturday Night Live” parody of the crackpot right.
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  39. teakwood
    • 2007 February 6, Martha Schwendener, “Believers and Doubters, Inspired by the Word”, New York Times:
      Like Chagall, who grew up in a Hasidic household in Vitebsk, Belarus, the painter Ben-Zion and Chaim Gross, represented here by a beautiful teakwood sculpture of Judith, also came from religious families.
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  40. trecento
    • 2007 February 6, Martha Schwendener, “Believers and Doubters, Inspired by the Word”, New York Times:
      This seems simplistic, as Warhol attended Mass several times a week, and his oeuvre is as obsessed with death as a museum full of trecento paintings.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. earylish = earlyish
    • 2007 February 6, Natalie Angier, “How Do We See Red? Count the Ways”, New York Times:
      It is up to our cone cells to capture color, and they don’t kick in until the dawn’s earylish light or its Edisonian equivalent, which is why we have almost no color vision at night.
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