User:Visviva/NYT 20070211

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
← Previous (2007-02-10) Words harvested from the New York Times, 2007-02-11
  • List status: open
→ Next (2007-02-12)

This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-02-11 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-01).

[ see all NYT pages ] - [ see all tracking lists ]

179113 tokens ‧ 132693 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13266 types ‧ 100 (~ 0.754%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-02-11[edit]

  1. anticolonialist
    • 2007 February 11, Dennis Lim, “One Angry African Puts Big Money on Trial”, New York Times:
      His revolutionary views grew more focused when he encountered the writings of Che Guevara, African-American civil rights activists like W. E. B. Dubois, and anticolonialist authors like Frantz Fanon and Aimé Césaire.
      add
  2. antiredundancy
    • 2007 February 11, William Safire, “Culpa for Mayor”, New York Times:
      Just about every old “labor skate” left standing, supported by the legions of the antiredundancy Squad Squad, caught me calling the organization initialized as the I.W.W. the International Workers of the World.” W. It is, of course, the Industrial Workers of the World.
      add
  3. antitax
    • 2007 February 11, Patrick Healy, “Searching for Mr. Right”, New York Times:
      This sort of language also resonates with other conservative wings of the party, like some members of the antitax faction who do not want to get bogged down over whether Mr. Romney is now sufficiently sincere in his opposition to abortion.
      add
  4. backcheck
    • 2007 February 11, Dave Caldwell, “In the N.H.L., Third-Period Leads Usually Hold Up”, New York Times:
      It can blanket attackers in its zone, or backcheck, and focus on sweeping the puck out of its zone, so the opponent has to regroup at neutral ice to start over.
      add
  5. backchecking
  6. banlieue
    • 2007 February 11, Uzodinma Iweala, “Colonial Castoff”, New York Times:
      Though Levy writes specifically about black Jamaican Britons and their struggles to be acknowledged as full members of the larger society, her novel illuminates the general situation facing all children of postcolonial immigrants across the West, from the banlieue of France to the Islamic neighborhoods of New York to the Hispanic ghettos of Los Angeles.
      add
  7. bek
    • 2007 February 11, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      The family of the bek arranged to make it look as if they had all been murdered by this Buljan fellow as a way to rid themselves once and for all of that boy.”
      add
  8. biorefineries
    • 2007 February 11, Timothy Egan, “Life on the Ethanol-Guzzling Prairie”, New York Times:
      That would follow an announcement just last month that a company whose investors include Bill Gates plans to open a corn-based ethanol plant here in Burley — the latest in a boom of biorefineries that are being planted in some of the most depressed areas of the United States.
      add
  9. biorefinery
    • 2007 February 11, Timothy Egan, “Life on the Ethanol-Guzzling Prairie”, New York Times:
      They see a biorefinery every 50 miles or so, turning out American fuel for American drivers from American crops.
      add
  10. blipster
    • 2007 February 11, “Letters”, New York Times:
      As a blipster, I was glad to see the article about black Americans who love rock (“Truly Indie Fans,” by Jessica Pressler, Jan. 28).
      add
  11. bohemianism
    • 2007 February 11, Gregory Beyer, “You’re Cool, but Can You Swing the Rent?”, New York Times:
      Now people in Ms. Jimeno’s position are inundated not with would-be hipsters in person but with e-mail messages desperately proclaiming their authors’ bohemianism. Ms. Jimeno got 60 responses to a Craigslist ad she posted last month to rent the second bedroom in her Roebling Street apartment, near the Williamsburg Bridge.
      add
  12. braidlike
    • 2007 February 11, Tim Murphy, “Amid Shifting Streets, a Wash and a Trim”, New York Times:
      And for a specialty style, like dreadlocks or the popular flat twist, in which the hair is coiled tightly against the scalp in braidlike rows, customers often visit far trendier salons where the simplest look starts at $100.
      add
  13. caricatural
    • 2007 February 11, Roberta Smith, “Michael Hurson, Whimsical Artist, Dies at 65”, New York Times:
      Michael Hurson, a New York-based artist whose drawings and paintings imbued human and inanimate subjects alike with a stylish caricatural energy, died on Jan. 29 in Nyack, N.Y.. He was 65 and lived in Garnerville, N.Y.
      add
  14. carmaking
    • 2007 February 11, Micheline Maynard, “In Chicago, Imports Go Native”, New York Times:
      In the case of General Motors, that description applies to two cars from opposite ends of its carmaking universe.
      add
  15. carpetbagging
  16. cavelike
  17. chapulines
  18. codrivers
    • 2007 February 11, Don Sherman, “Medical Regimen Keeps Racers Fresh”, New York Times:
      According to Roberto Moreno, one of Mr. Haywood’s codrivers at Daytona and a veteran of 41 Formula One and 122 Indy car races, “No team takes better care of its drivers than Brumos.”
      add
  19. couchbound
    • 2007 February 11, Dennis Lim, “One Couch Potato, Gently Roasted”, New York Times:
      He may be truly agoraphobic — he doesn’t venture outside until the sixth episode — but his couchbound apathy masks a ruthless manipulative streak, as when he cons a Meals on Wheels volunteer into delivering his lunches.
      add
  20. counterattacked
    • 2007 February 11, Richard Brookhiser, “Revolution Part II”, New York Times:
      In a struggle for control of Lake Erie, the American commodore Oliver Perry, sick with dysentery, fought until every gun on his flagship was destroyed, then rowed to a second ship, counterattacked and forced the British to surrender.
      add
  21. creaturedom
    • 2007 February 11, Will Blythe, “Food for the Soul”, New York Times:
      An acceptance of our common creaturedom is essential not just to the health of the planet but to our ordinary happiness.
      add
  22. customizers
    • 2007 February 11, Jerry Garrett, “A Famous Customizer Runs Afoul of California’s Clean-Air Cops”, New York Times:
      In December 2004, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration announced that it had fined customizers involved in three programs, including MTV’s “Pimp My Ride,” for removing federally mandated safety equipment from vehicles they customized, including the replacement of steering wheel air bags with video monitors.
      add
  23. deracination
    • 2007 February 11, Stephen Metcalf, “Informal Menace”, New York Times:
      Gone is the callow fondness for the climate of war, and the automatic urgency it bestows on the young writer; instead, all urgency is in favor of simple belonging rescued from a world of deracination.
      add
  24. diclofenac
  25. discussable
  26. fireless
    • 2007 February 11, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      Over the four nights of the journey into Azerbaijan, as they picked their way down serpentine tracks and through thundering gorges — avoiding the main road, traveling in darkness — the stripling paused his recitations only to eat, to doze in the saddle or wrapped in his bearskin in their fireless camps and to make the two attempts at flight that at last necessitated his being bound and tied to the cantle.
      add
  27. gerbera
    • 2007 February 11, Phyllis Korkki, “For Americans, Giving Roses Is a Foreign Affair”, New York Times:
      If you want to buy American for Valentine’s Day, you may want to break with tradition and consider cut flowers that still have a strong domestic presence: orchids, gerbera daisies, irises, lilies and tulips.
      add
  28. immersionist
    • 2007 February 11, Elizabeth Royte, “Nature Girl”, New York Times:
      An immersionist, she wants to let her blood course into the earth, to lie naked in the sun, to feel the tides flood her body, “inside and out.”
      add
  29. incommunicative
    • 2007 February 11, Daniel Jones, “Dear Editor, the Secret of Love Is ...”, New York Times:
      Among the truckloads of divorce and breakup stories I’ve received, the prevailing sentiment is that the man is either at fault or too incommunicative for fault to be properly established.
      add
  30. layback
    • 2007 February 11, The Associated Press, “Lake Placid Commemorates Its Jump Into the Olympics”, New York Times:
      Now 86, Colledge, the first woman to execute a double jump (a double salchow) and the inventor of the camel and the layback spins and the one-foot axel jump, could hardly wait.
      add
  31. longboarder
  32. loutishness
    • 2007 February 11, Jonathan Miles, “Saints and Sinners Unite”, New York Times:
      True, this is hardly the drink to inspire “Girls Gone Wild” loutishness.
      add
  33. memex
    • 2007 February 11, Matt Weiland, “Web of Spies”, New York Times:
      Surely when Vannevar Bush imagined his hyperlinked memex or Jorge Luis Borges his Library of Babel or Tim Berners-Lee his World Wide Web, what excited them wasn’t the possibility of reading the boldfaced words “nympho starlets” in a printed novel, racing to the nearest computer to type a U.R.L. into a browser and watching a YouTube clip of James Blunt singing “You’re Beautiful” over scenes of Sharon Tate in “The Fearless Vampire Killers.”
      add
  34. mishegoss
    • 2007 February 11, William Safire, “Culpa for Mayor”, New York Times:
      On the contrary, the Michigander’s mishegoss is driven by my choice of the on-guard anticipate when he thinks I should have used the more general, all-purpose verb expect.
      add
  35. misshelved
    • 2007 February 11, Elizabeth Schmidt, “Erasing Slavery”, New York Times:
      She scoured the library for misshelved volumes, reread five surrounding volumes, reviewed her early notes but never found that paragraph imprinted in her memory, “the words filling less than half a page, the address on Clark Street, the remarks about her appearance, all of which where typed up by a machine in need of new ribbon.”
      add
  36. multipolar
    • 2007 February 11, Thom Shanker, “Putin Says U.S. Is Undermining Global Stability”, New York Times:
      Senator John McCain , the Arizona Republican widely expected to make a bid for the White House, made a rebuttal that began, “In today’s multipolar world, there is no place for needless confrontation.”
      add
  37. nonadmirer
    • 2007 February 11, William Safire, “Culpa for Mayor”, New York Times:
      In comes a snail-mail missive from a nonadmirer in Detroit enclosing that column, underlining the word anticipate and scrawling across the ripped-out page “we can expect .”
      add
  38. noncall
  39. noncanine
    • 2007 February 11, William Safire, “Culpa for Mayor”, New York Times:
      I predicted that “we can anticipate such a description of noncanine involvement.”
      add
  40. nondraft
  41. nonhierarchical
    • 2007 February 11, Claire Wilson, “Home Sweet Office for Ikea’s Workers”, New York Times:
      It was a democratic and nonhierarchical management structure that helped determine the office configuration in the headquarters building, which has 75,000 square feet of space.
      add
  42. nonhipsters
  43. nonsoundtrack
    • 2007 February 11, Geoffrey Himes, “John Waters’s Love Songs, Suitably Bizarre”, New York Times:
      “A Date With John Waters” (New Line Records), his second nonsoundtrack album, is a collection of his favorite twisted love songs.
      add
  44. nonthrowing
  45. oddsmakers
    • 2007 February 11, Nathaniel Vinton, “Some More Wacky Weather Claims Men’s Downhill Race”, New York Times:
      Racers, oddsmakers and the sport’s pundits almost universally agree that Bode Miller and Anja Paerson of Sweden are the gold-medal favorites in their respective downhill races.
      add
  46. onlies
    • 2007 February 11, Liesl Schillinger, “And Baby Makes Three”, New York Times:
      Some of the onlies loathed their solitary state — like the short story writer Sarah Towers, who felt so lonely as a child that she tried to persuade her father to adopt a chimp.
      add
  47. overseasoning
    • 2007 February 11, Geoff Nicholson, “What Not to Wear”, New York Times:
      Some might think this was overseasoning the bloody mary, but Hill is untroubled by the possibility that more might be less.
      add
  48. paradigmatically
  49. picholine
    • 2007 February 11, Howard G. Goldberg, “Two Dry Treats From Spain”, New York Times:
      Sip them with tapas, anchovies, Serrano ham, Manchego cheese, picholine olives and artichoke hearts.
      add
  50. pocketable
    • 2007 February 11, David Colman, “Leather, Yes. Kinky, Not So Much.”, New York Times:
      While it implies that sex is as pocketable a part of life as money and keys, the little leather good also lends a certain dignity and polish to the often lamented (or worse, often ignored) realities of sex.
      add
  51. postmarketing
    • 2007 February 11, “Put to the Test”, New York Times:
      It’s not just postmarketing surveillance.
      add
  52. predraft
    • 2007 February 11, Vincent M. Mallozzi, “Rodman, Despite Antics, Is Hoping for the Hall”, New York Times:
      Rodman, a little-known player out of Southeastern Oklahoma State , began appearing on N.B.A. radar screens after strong predraft workouts in 1986, the year the Pistons selected him in the second round of the draft, 27th over all.
      add
  53. preemptively
    • 2007 February 11, Patrick Healy, “In New Hampshire, Clinton Owns Up to Her Vote on Iraq War”, New York Times:
      At a forum with 2,000 people in the state capital here, she first blamed President Bush for misusing her vote to go to war preemptively, and then obliquely questioned the Iraq positions of her two leading rivals for the Democratic nomination , Senator Barack Obama of Illinois and John Edwards , former senator of North Carolina.
      add
  54. prewedding
    • 2007 February 11, Mireya Navarro, “How Green Was My Wedding”, New York Times:
      Gather more than 150 friends and relatives at an organic farm for a prewedding day of hikes and environmental tours.
      add
  55. punctuations
    • 2007 February 11, Mark Olsen, “Back to Memphis, This Time Making the City Moan”, New York Times:
      In keeping with the film’s story Mr. Bomar’s score was recorded by a small combo, rather than by a larger orchestra with the swelling strings and obvious emotional punctuations of so much current film music.
      add
  56. pushbutton
    • 2007 February 11, Micheline Maynard, “In Chicago, Imports Go Native”, New York Times:
      In addition to a pushbutton ignition switch, the Highlander has second-row captain’s chairs that can be converted into a bench seat by inserting a center seat.
      add
  57. repointing
    • 2007 February 11, Jay Romano, “Triggering a Rent Increase”, New York Times:
      But if it is done in conjunction with repointing of the building, the work would probably qualify as a major capital improvement.
      add
  58. repressiveness
    • 2007 February 11, Dan Bilefsky, “Spain Says Adiós Siesta and Hola Viagra”, New York Times:
      Sociologists say that an increased willingness to address sexual problems reflects Spain’s sexual liberation after the repressiveness of the Franco years.
      add
  59. ribollita
  60. salchow
    • 2007 February 11, The Associated Press, “Lake Placid Commemorates Its Jump Into the Olympics”, New York Times:
      Now 86, Colledge, the first woman to execute a double jump (a double salchow) and the inventor of the camel and the layback spins and the one-foot axel jump, could hardly wait.
      add
  61. semiattached
    • 2007 February 11, Joyce Cohen, “A Firehouse Reinvented by Art”, New York Times:
      They passed a for-rent sign on a three-bedroom semiattached house, which they rented for $1,400 a month.
      add
  62. siblingless
    • 2007 February 11, Liesl Schillinger, “And Baby Makes Three”, New York Times:
      For Betty Rollin, a memoirist who grew up in Yonkers, being siblingless meant that she was pampered, adored and showered with gifts.
      add
  63. silkscreened
    • 2007 February 11, Joyce Cohen, “A Firehouse Reinvented by Art”, New York Times:
      Ms. Elia, who does painting and photography, had just begun a clothing line, CandyRot, which features silkscreened and appliquéd T-shirts.
      add
  64. snickety
    • 2007 February 11, “Hample vs. Snicket”, New York Times:
      The sketch on this page indicates that Mr. Handler is not only Lemony, but excessively snickety.
      add
  65. songful
    • 2007 February 11, Steve Smith, “A High-Octane Chamber Group’s Continuing Insurrection”, New York Times:
      Mr. Dufallo’s songful “Lighthouse” has the breezy sway of bossa nova, and Ms. Lawson’s “Chai” is filled with gritty, grainy blues sounds. Mr. Farris is represented by “Pelimanni’s Revenge,” an arrangement of a rustic folk dance originally performed by JPP, a Finnish group.
      add
  66. songlines
    • 2007 February 11, Elizabeth Royte, “Nature Girl”, New York Times:
      On global warming : “Ice melts, language melts, a culture melts, a climate melts, and all the music, the songlines of ice-alive melt to the engineered unmusic, the silence of a melting world.”
      add
  67. speedskater
    • 2007 February 11, The Associated Press, “Lake Placid Commemorates Its Jump Into the Olympics”, New York Times:
      At 91, he was America’s oldest living Winter Olympics gold medalist and had also been a key player in securing the 1980 Games for Lake Placid, made most memorable by the exploits of speedskater Eric Heiden, who captured five gold medals, and the United States Olympic hockey team’s Miracle on Ice.
      add
  68. spouseless
    • 2007 February 11, Byron Calame, “Can a 15-Year-Old Be a ‘Woman Without a Spouse’?”, New York Times:
      But the new majority materialized only because The Times chose to use survey data that counted, as spouseless women, teenagers 15 through 17 — almost 90 percent of whom were living with their parents.
      add
  69. stagings
    • 2007 February 11, Jennifer Bleyer, “A Finale, Frozen in Time”, New York Times:
      In the sleeping alcove are two carved wooden chairs that Booth used in stagings of “Hamlet.”
      add
  70. storybooklike
  71. subletters
    • 2007 February 11, Dennis Lim, “One Couch Potato, Gently Roasted”, New York Times:
      After accidentally killing a homeless man with a bag of cat food — long story — Nathan winds up in jail, paving the way for a revolving door of eccentric subletters (a cat-hating Wiccan, a pair of possibly gay neo-Nazis).
      add
  72. superblocks
    • 2007 February 11, Phillip Lopate, “A Town Revived, a Villain Redeemed”, New York Times:
      This imperious master builder has seemed to many the embodiment of all of modernism’s mistakes, gutting cherished working-class neighborhoods with highways, and more interested in big projects and superblocks than in preserving the past with fine-grained restorations.
      add
  73. supersimple
  74. thes
    • 2007 February 11, Jennifer Bleyer, “A Finale, Frozen in Time”, New York Times:
      High on the wall is a framed rubbing of the epitaph on Shakespeare’s tomb: “Blese be he that spares thes stones, and curst be he that moves my bones.”
      add
  75. tonelessness
    • 2007 February 11, Stephen Metcalf, “Informal Menace”, New York Times:
      So much menace, so much studied tonelessness and unmusicality — and on the part of so young a virtuoso — is disturbing, to say the least, and it comes a relief when he lays it aside.
      add
  76. uncostumed
  77. underfinancing
    • 2007 February 11, Ronald Smothers, “Seeing Mixed Signals From Corzine on Taxes”, New York Times:
      Ms. Katz and others say the state is now making up for years of underfinancing the pension fund, which will eat into any savings needed to help rein in property taxes.
      add
  78. ungated
    • 2007 February 11, Marcelle S. Fischler, “Move in and You’ve Joined a Club”, New York Times:
      Likening the village “to an adult camp,” he added, “it’s similar to an ungated gated community.”
      add
  79. unmusic
    • 2007 February 11, Elizabeth Royte, “Nature Girl”, New York Times:
      On global warming : “Ice melts, language melts, a culture melts, a climate melts, and all the music, the songlines of ice-alive melt to the engineered unmusic, the silence of a melting world.”
      add
  80. unmusicality
    • 2007 February 11, Stephen Metcalf, “Informal Menace”, New York Times:
      So much menace, so much studied tonelessness and unmusicality — and on the part of so young a virtuoso — is disturbing, to say the least, and it comes a relief when he lays it aside.
      add
  81. unprolific
    • 2007 February 11, Stephen Metcalf, “Informal Menace”, New York Times:
      With the possible exception of cliquishness, in each of these regards Fenton is more like Larkin: plain-spoken, unprolific and firmly in possession of a deflated sense of poetic vocation.
      add
  82. unrecommended
    • 2007 February 11, Allison Glock, “The Man Show”, New York Times:
      He is strongest describing place — an old motor lodge rests in “a highly unrecommended corner of Tulsa,” a Detroit house is “the sort of box that if you tripped coming in the front door, you found yourself falling out the back.”
      add
  83. vortexlike
    • 2007 February 11, Dennis Lim, “One Couch Potato, Gently Roasted”, New York Times:
      To watch “Twitch City,” in other words, is often to watch someone watch TV. The screen serves as a de facto mirror — a nifty trick for a show about the vortexlike pull and mind-altering possibilities of television.
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. heartmaking
    • 2007 February 11, Matt Weiland, “Web of Spies”, New York Times:
      Everything was worthless yet beyond value; seeing it was heartbreaking and heartmaking all at once, like seeing the endless rows of graves at Arlington.
      add
  2. overintellectuals
    • 2007 February 11, Allison Glock, “The Man Show”, New York Times:
      Men crave dignity and fulfillment, and when they cannot attain those, they become unhappy, quarrelsome, small-minded, blowhards, overintellectuals, chauvinists, cowards, dopers, abstainers, aesthetes, racists, talk show know-it-alls and critics,” he writes with authority, conviction.
      add
  3. parentmobile
    • 2007 February 11, Micheline Maynard, “In Chicago, Imports Go Native”, New York Times:
      While the Highlander seems like the quintessential parentmobile, two new Scions continue Toyota’s four-year effort to appeal to young hipsters.
      add
  4. tripfest
    • 2007 February 11, Allison Glock, “The Man Show”, New York Times:
      In another chapter, at the conclusion of an otherwise deliciously squalid account of the self-righteous hippie tripfest known as Burning Man, LeDuff actually assumes the role of God, a choice both perplexing and redundant.
      add
  5. versers
    • 2007 February 11, J. Patrick Lewis, “Children’s Books”, New York Times:
      Since there is a suspicion of poets who write strictly in rhyme, as opposed to Poets-with-a-Capital-P free versers, the bar is set high for Prelutsky.
      add