User:Visviva/NYT 20070218

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-02-18 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-01).

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169169 tokens ‧ 125322 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12919 types ‧ 82 (~ 0.635%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-02-18[edit]

  1. aromatherapeutic
    • 2007 February 18, Rob Walker, “Scent of a Woman”, New York Times:
      For instance, while it is hard to imagine Mrs. Thelma A. Meyer buying Aveda candles, her Web site statement promises that the cleaners “work like the dickens on dirt” and are “also aromatherapeutic, which is another fancy word for healthy and good.”
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  2. bioacoustics
    • 2007 February 18, Jeff Hull, “The Noises of Nature”, New York Times:
      Intrigued, Krause went back to school, studying bioacoustics at Union Institute and University in Cincinnati in 1981.
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  3. bohemianism
  4. branzino
    • 2007 February 18, Monica Corcoran, “Strike Up the Turntable”, New York Times:
      At that very moment on this recent Friday night, though, it was a roasted branzino with glassy eyes that was ogling her.
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  5. budgetarily
    • 2007 February 18, Teri Karush Rogers, “The Psychology of Pricing”, New York Times:
      So, for example, if the market value of an apartment is around $610,000, brokers generally advise sellers to round down to $600,000 so that the property lands within a buyer’s budgetarily myopic field of vision.
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  6. comebackers
    • 2007 February 18, Ben Shpigel, “At Mets’ Camp, Pitchers Need Never Be Lonely”, New York Times:
      After warming up, they clickety-clacked through four fielding rotations, practicing pickoff moves, fielding comebackers and covering first base.
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  7. croquetas
    • 2007 February 18, “Hail to the Menus”, New York Times:
      The restaurant’s croquetas, or savory fritters, are served piping hot, with a molten core.
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  8. cubeland
  9. deconstructivism
  10. deskside
    • 2007 February 18, Abby Ellin, “When the Food Critics Are Deskside”, New York Times:
      Ms. Wilesmith welcomes deskside dining because she views it as a sign of dedication to the company.
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  11. downings
    • 2007 February 18, Michael R. Gordon, “Planning Seen in Iraqi Attacks on U.S. Copters”, New York Times:
      In several recent helicopter downings, the attackers used a variety of weapons, including shoulder-fired surface-to-air missiles, heavy machine guns, rocket-propelled grenades and unguided rockets that cannot be diverted by the flares helicopters disperse to fool heat-seeking systems.
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  12. dynastical
  13. egretlike
    • 2007 February 18, Ben Brantley, “When Adaptation Is Bold Innovation”, New York Times:
      Instead the play focuses on Don Juan (the egretlike Rhys Ifans) as an aristocratic anachronism, a vestige of a dead age who has nothing left to do but play games and exercise his droit de seigneur.
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  14. epiphanic
    • 2007 February 18, Dwight Garner, “Inside the List”, New York Times:
      Forty-two years after Dickey’s review, Oliver’s epiphanic nature poems still divide critics.
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  15. expectedly
    • 2007 February 18, Ben Brantley, “When Adaptation Is Bold Innovation”, New York Times:
      More expectedly (and successfully), the Royal Shakespeare Company offers up a “Richard III” that speaks to contemporary fears of the hatreds that breed fascism, with the eponymous crookback played (by the rising young actor Jonathan Slinger) as a festering skinhead who addresses the audience with the complicity of a caveman comic.
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  16. fillups
    • 2007 February 18, Jim Motavalli, “A Self-Serve Station, in Your Garage”, New York Times:
      The disadvantage of slow fillups is somewhat offset by the cost, the equivalent of $1.20 to $1.40 a gallon, Mr. Carr said.
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  17. gastropodous
    • 2007 February 18, “Fiction Chronicle”, New York Times:
      And yet, despite its occasionally gastropodous pacing, “Exile” delivers the sort of torn-from-the-headlines story Patterson’s fans have come to expect.
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  18. halfcourt
  19. hitless
    • 2007 February 18, “Letters to the Editor”, New York Times:
      The assertion that Tiger Woods’s losses overseas should be applicable to his PGA Tour streak is akin to stating that an injured major league baseball player’s hitting streak should end if, on a rehabilitation assignment, he were to go hitless in a minor league game.
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  20. hitmaking
    • 2007 February 18, Jon Pareles, “They Can Play. Can They Play Nice?”, New York Times:
      Although Mr. Copeland founded and named the Police, Sting quickly emerged both as the band’s voice and its hitmaking songwriter.
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  21. hymned
    • 2007 February 18, Ben Brantley, “When Adaptation Is Bold Innovation”, New York Times:
      Directed by Mr. Grandage, this production provides the Don’s valet with a BlackBerry to keep tabs on his conquests (quite a few more than the 1,003 hymned in Mozart’s “Don Giovanni”) and fuels his libidinous forays with mountains of cocaine.
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  22. iconically
    • 2007 February 18, Jon Gertner, “From 0 to 60 to World Domination”, New York Times:
      It was researched, designed, engineered and built in America, Lentz pointed out; and it seemed, from his presentation, to be the toughest, brawniest and most iconically masculine pickup truck anywhere, ever.
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  23. ineludible
    • 2007 February 18, C. J. Chivers, “Killed in Action, but Not by the Enemy”, New York Times:
      Forty years ago in Vietnam, an Army captain prepared a document that provided a glimpse at these grim, ineludible facts.
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  24. interluded
    • 2007 February 18, Tammy La Gorce, “Between Songs, Interludes That Fall Upon Deaf Ears”, New York Times:
      Jimmy Jam, co-producer of Ms. Jackson’s heavily interluded and influential 1989 album, “Rhythm Nation 1814” (and producer of a forthcoming album by Usher with interludes), also defended them.
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  25. ipod
  26. kombu
    • 2007 February 18, Fuchsia Dunlop, “China’s True Dash of Flavor”, New York Times:
      It was discovered in 1908 by a Japanese scientist, Kikunae Ikeda, who was trying to pinpoint the source of the intense deliciousness of broth made from kombu seaweed.
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  27. lycanthropic
    • 2007 February 18, Dave Kehr, “A Creepy Stash of Movie Magic, Lovingly Amassed”, New York Times:
      He had kept the silver wolf’s head cane ornament that Claude Rains used to kill his lycanthropic son, Lon Chaney Jr., in “The Wolf Man” in 1941.
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  28. microgenre
    • 2007 February 18, Ben Ratliff, “Soft Balladry, Raw Angularity and Beats With Heavy Feet”, New York Times:
      The latest project of Justin Broadrick, once the patriarch of the industrial-metal microgenre called grindcore with his mid-’80s band Godflesh, Jesu is about sensuality, not revulsion.
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  29. midocean
    • 2007 February 18, Langdon Hammer, “Gamesmanship”, New York Times:
      The expression “horse latitudes,” the book jacket explains, “refers to those areas 30 degrees north and south of the Equator where sailing ships tend to stand becalmed in midocean, where stasis (if not stagnation) is the order of the day, and where sailors ... would throw their live cargo overboard to lighten the load and conserve food and water.”
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  30. moblogging
  31. modelesque
    • 2007 February 18, Gina Kolata, “Psst! Ask for Donor 1913”, New York Times:
      Donor 1913, the staff notes in his file, is “extremely attractive,” adding in a kind of clinical swoon, “He has a strong modelesque jaw line and sparkling hazel eyes.
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  32. moonshiners
    • 2007 February 18, Viv Bernstein, “No Cutting Corners as Nascar Seeks a Clean Start”, New York Times:
      Stock-car racing, a sport that began with moonshiners, is filled with old-timers who still chuckle over the stories from the days when they would try to pull a fast one on Nascar.
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  33. multiplatinum
    • 2007 February 18, Tammy La Gorce, “Between Songs, Interludes That Fall Upon Deaf Ears”, New York Times:
      The album is a multiplatinum seller and had the most album pre-orders in iTunes history, but “LoveStoned” has been downloaded just 39,000 times versus more than 1.75 million downloads of the hit “SexyBack.”
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  34. nonairline
  35. nonanesthetic
    • 2007 February 18, Lawrence Downes, “Running Into Fences”, New York Times:
      He seeks to widen them somehow, by doing something else, something tactile, nonanesthetic, something to get adrenaline moving in his numbed veins.
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  36. nonbeneficial
    • 2007 February 18, Ezekiel Emanuel, “Unequal treatment”, New York Times:
      In more recent times, she writes, they have been disproportionately enrolled in risky, nonbeneficial research in gynecology, oncology, surgery, pediatrics , infectious disease and genetics .
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  37. nonconsensual
    • 2007 February 18, Ezekiel Emanuel, “Unequal treatment”, New York Times:
      Researchers who exploit African-Americans,” Washington writes, “were the norm for much of our nation’s history, when black patients were commonly regarded as fit subjects for nonconsensual, nontherapeutic research.”
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  38. noncontrolling
    • 2007 February 18, Jim Motavalli, “A Self-Serve Station, in Your Garage”, New York Times:
      Honda, which has been selling 1,000 natural gas Civics a year — about 60 percent at retail and the rest to corporate or government fleets — owns a noncontrolling stake in FuelMaker.
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  39. nontherapeutic
    • 2007 February 18, Ezekiel Emanuel, “Unequal treatment”, New York Times:
      In the so-called Jewish Chronic Disease Hospital case of 1963, for instance, prominent researchers injected live cancer cells into nursing home residents, some of whom were Holocaust survivors, to determine whether the immune systems of sick individuals could identify and eliminate foreign cancer tissue as those of healthy people do — a classic case of “nonconsensual, nontherapeutic experimentation.”
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  40. outtrade
  41. overdriven
    • 2007 February 18, Ben Ratliff, “Soft Balladry, Raw Angularity and Beats With Heavy Feet”, New York Times:
      Intertwining, staccato rhythmic patterns by overdriven guitars and basses — the kind of thing that makes rock critics say “angular” in their sleep — used to be merely a sign of semi-competence; now it’s a trademark post-punk device with 30 years of formidable history.
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  42. phrasedicks
    • 2007 February 18, William Safire, “Third Rail”, New York Times:
      To approach the answer — of great import to phrasedicks and other etymologists — we must deal with the reluctance of sources to reveal their identities as well as the controversial fidelity of journalists to maintain promised confidentiality.
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  43. pickoff
    • 2007 February 18, Ben Shpigel, “At Mets’ Camp, Pitchers Need Never Be Lonely”, New York Times:
      After warming up, they clickety-clacked through four fielding rotations, practicing pickoff moves, fielding comebackers and covering first base.
      add
  44. polyphonous
    • 2007 February 18, Jeff Hull, “The Noises of Nature”, New York Times:
      Krause’s “niche hypothesis” may seem more plausible after you’ve listened to his recordings of dense tropical jungles, polyphonous soundscapes packed with whistles and whinnies, whoops, hoots and howls, deep bass throbbings and shrieking buzzes.
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  45. porkfest
    • 2007 February 18, Anatol Lieven, “A State of Terror”, New York Times:
      Domestic security has proved a magnificent porkfest for a great range of beneficiaries, some of them even more unlikely than Weeki Wachee Springs.
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  46. preteenage
  47. pricer
    • 2007 February 18, Teri Karush Rogers, “The Psychology of Pricing”, New York Times:
      “I always joke with people that I’m a department store pricer, because I think that psychologically the first number has an impact,” said Frederick W. Peters, the president of Warburg Realty.
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  48. prowlike
    • 2007 February 18, Alex Mindlin, “Things That Go Bump in the Street”, New York Times:
      Its cement surface is deeply scarred with parallel gouges, and the prowlike end that faces the drive is bitten and chipped away.
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  49. remilitarization
    • 2007 February 18, Dagmar Herzog, “Handouts From Hitler”, New York Times:
      In more sophisticated versions, the German people are understood to have been taken in by Hitler’s charisma not least because the remilitarization he initiated — not to mention the Wehrmacht’s early battlefield successes — was a balm to wounded national pride.
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  50. rudderlessly
  51. semiprivacy
  52. semireligious
    • 2007 February 18, Margalit Fox, “Ian Stevenson Dies at 88; Studied Claims of Past Lives”, New York Times:
      His mother had a keen interest in theosophy, the system of semireligious mystical beliefs popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Dr. Stevenson would credit her vast library of books on the subject with creating his interest in spiritual phenomena.
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  53. septics
    • 2007 February 18, Jerry Cheslow, “Homes: 1,681; Horses: More Than 500”, New York Times:
      Older homes can have failing septics, and brokers emphasize the need for thorough inspections before any purchase of an older home.
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  54. spaetzle
    • 2007 February 18, “Hail to the Menus”, New York Times:
      The menu, which changes frequently, currently includes Hudson Valley venison with Jerusalem artichoke purée, foraged mushrooms and Stone Barns mâche, and Berkshire pork with fromage blanc, spaetzle and Stone Barns arugula.
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  55. squeegeeing
    • 2007 February 18, Daniel J. Wakin, “The Face-the-Music Academy”, New York Times:
      On this day in mid-November inside a theater lobby, the ordeal was hardly made easier by the window washer squeegeeing the glass door or by Beethoven’s “Eroica” playing from a video screen outside.
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  56. steelmaking
    • 2007 February 18, J. Alex Tarquinio, “Amid a Merger Guessing Game, Steel Stocks Thrive”, New York Times:
      Michael F. Gambardella, the JPMorgan analyst who wrote the report, said that he still expected more mergers in the steel industry this year and that “U.S. steelmaking assets are attractive to foreign buyers because it’s probably the single best market for them to be in.”
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  57. supersensitive
    • 2007 February 18, Jeff Hull, “The Noises of Nature”, New York Times:
      Krause employs supersensitive recording equipment and computer programs to create spectrograms of these group vocalizations, visual printouts indicating the stratified sounds according to time and frequency — not unlike a symphonic score.
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  58. theatermakers
    • 2007 February 18, Ben Brantley, “When Adaptation Is Bold Innovation”, New York Times:
      The confidence of this new generation of theatermakers, many of whom are in their 30s and 40s, is evident in its willingness to embrace and transform elements associated with other, often competitive art forms.
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  59. throbbings
    • 2007 February 18, Jeff Hull, “The Noises of Nature”, New York Times:
      Krause’s “niche hypothesis” may seem more plausible after you’ve listened to his recordings of dense tropical jungles, polyphonous soundscapes packed with whistles and whinnies, whoops, hoots and howls, deep bass throbbings and shrieking buzzes.
      add
  60. twitchily
    • 2007 February 18, Alex Mindlin, “Things That Go Bump in the Street”, New York Times:
      And many of these people have trouble keeping up with the twitchily fast pace of the stoplights along Grand Street, especially at the artery’s eastern end.
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  61. underinflated
    • 2007 February 18, “Letters”, New York Times:
      Maybe the tire could emit the scent whenever it is underinflated — after all, a car with properly inflated tires gets the best gasoline mileage.
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  62. undermaintained
    • 2007 February 18, Jake Mooney, “A Case of the Shivers”, New York Times:
      The cracking sound, he explained, as far as I, a non-plumber, could understand, was the sound of the overworked, undermaintained and weirdly installed heating unit’s core rupturing and spilling water into the basement.
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  63. undoglike
    • 2007 February 18, “Letters”, New York Times:
      This overemphasis on the looks of a dog — whether it's up to the breed standard, whether it's adorable or whether it's "in" — is so undoglike.
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  64. unsalvageable
    • 2007 February 18, Michael Pollak, “A Canine’s Right to Ride”, New York Times:
      But experts whom Ms. Lootens consulted said the original marble artwork was unsalvageable because of damage from car exhaust.
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  65. unstrange
    • 2007 February 18, Kathryn Harrison, “Lives in the Arts”, New York Times:
      What’s more, “it did so in a notably unstrange manner.”
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  66. untedious
    • 2007 February 18, Jim Holt, “Self Centered”, New York Times:
      Even his dreams, of which he recounts a good half dozen (one involving Alan Bennett, another involving Roger Moore), are surprisingly untedious.
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  67. untelevised
    • 2007 February 18, Monica Corcoran, “Strike Up the Turntable”, New York Times:
      “My job is to keep the mood upbeat and to keep everyone from wandering off to the bar during commercials,” said Ms. Richardson, 42, who will be playing three-minute sets from a suspended booth during untelevised breaks.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. danzon: missing an accent, not generally borrowed into English
    • 2007 February 18, Jim Lewis, “Havana Nights”, New York Times:
      The danzon for which the book is named appears and then vanishes again, as do several black-and-white movies, the injections of gold that Roderico takes to cure his disease and (the name itself is like an incantation) Idlewild airport.
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  2. microamaranth
    • 2007 February 18, Matt Lee And Ted Lee, “Fruit (and Vegetable) Smoothie”, New York Times:
      Marble-size creamer potatoes (for Gray Kunz), microamaranth (for Iacopo Falai) and rainbow baby cauliflower (for Masaharu Morimoto) are just some of the 600 different fruits and vegetables in Riviera’s warehouse at any given time.
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  3. newsmagese
    • 2007 February 18, William Safire, “Third Rail”, New York Times:
      (I think that is newsmagese for “pull quote,” a sentence or two of large type that typographically enlivens a page or Web-site screen.)
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  4. nontheatergoers
    • 2007 February 18, Ben Brantley, “When Adaptation Is Bold Innovation”, New York Times:
      I’m not talking about star appeal, and particularly not that aspect of theater most relied upon to attract inveterate nontheatergoers: the chance to see a real-live celebrity in three dimensions instead of two.
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  5. skreeek
    • 2007 February 18, Lawrence Downes, “Running Into Fences”, New York Times:
      He may hear the satisfying skreeek of posts and slats giving way, then feel the ecstasy of free fall and a ratifying eruption of giggles.
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